Leighton Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Leighton Family Coat of Arms

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Leighton Coat of Arms Meaning

Leighton Name Origin & History

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Leighton Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Leighton blazon are the escallop and bend. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Leighton Name

Leighton Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Leighton:

The surname of Leighton is said to be a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Leighton, the places from which the name derived were found throughout the country of England. The word itself derives from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “leac” which can be translated to mean “a leek” and was used to describe a leek farm. The surname of Leighton is also considered to be a topographical surname. A topographical surname is used to describe someone who lived on or near a residential landmark. This landmark could be either man made or natural, and would have been easily identifiable in the area from which it hailed, thus making the people who lived near it easily distinguished. Those who were given the surname of Leighton were said to live on or near a leek farm, or someone who worked on or near a leek farm.

Variations:

More common variations are: Lleighton, Leightonn, Leightton, Lighton, Leighten, Laighton, Leightin, Lioghton, Leiton, Leightan, Leiton

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Leighton can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Richard de Lecton was mentioned in the document known as the Pipe Rolls of the county of Staffordshire in the year of 1201. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King John of England, who was known throughout the ages and commonly referred to as one “John the Lackland.” King John I of England ruled from the year of 1199 to the year of 1216. Other mentions of the surname of Leighton within the country of England include one Roger de Layton who was mentioned in the document known as the Hundred Rolls of Huntingdon in the year of 1276, and one William de Leton who was recorded within the document known as the Cheshire Rolls in the year of 1287. Those who bear the surname of Leighton within the country of England can be found in the areas of Shropshire, Cheshire, Huntingdon, and Bedfordshire.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Leighton within the country of Scotland can be found in a high concentration within the area of Lanarkshire.

United States of America:

Within the United States of America, many European citizens began to migrate during the European Migration, which was a movement of people who were dissatisfied with their government and were in search of a better life. Among those who migrated to the United States of America, which was at that time known as the New World or the Colonies, was one Robert Leighton who arrived in the state of Virginia in the year of 1664, and who was the first recorded Leighton in America.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Leighton: United States 10,828; England 5,991; Chile 2,194; Australia 1,948; Canada 1,705; South Africa 1,479; Wales 677; Scotland 578; New Zealand 506; Jamaica 393

Notable People:

Lillianne Brown “Lillian” Leighton (1874-1956) who was a silent film actress who stared in over 200 films before she retired in the year of 1940, and who was from America.

John Atkinson Leighton (1861-1956) who was a Major League Baseball (MLB) outfielder for the Syracuse Stars in the year of 1890, and who was from America.

Ronald Bruce Leighton (born in 1951) who serves as a federal judge in the United States.

George N. Leighton (born in 1912) who was a film and television editor who was nominated for an Academy Award, who is most notably recognized for his work on Now You See Me (2013), The Princess Bride (1987), A Few Good Men (1992), and Stand By Me (1986), and who was from America.

Laura Leighton (born in 1968) who was an actress from America.

Francis Knyvett Leighton (1806-1881) wo was a priest, academic, a Warden of All Souls College, which is located in Oxford from the year of 1858 to the year of 1881, and who served as the Vice-Chancellor of Oxford University from the year of 1866 to the year of 1870, and who was from the country of England.

Leighton Family Gift Ideas

Browse Leighton family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Randolph de Leighton, 20 Edward I., 1330). Ar. three eagles' heads erased sa.
2) (Watlesborough, co. Salop, bart.). Motto—Dread shame. (Bausley, or Ballesley, co. Montgomery, and of Shrewsbury; Rev. Francis Knyvett Leighton, descended from Daniel Leighton, Lieut,-CoI. in Gen. Evans’ horse, younger son of Sir Edward Leighton, first bart.). Quarterly, per fesse indented or and gu. Crest—A wyvern, wings expanded sa.
3) Quarterly, indented or and gu. in the 2nd and 3rd quarters six (another, three) boars’ heads of the first, three and three.
4) (Sir Bryan Leyghton, temp. Henry VIII.). Sa. on a bend ar. three escallops gu.
5) Ar. a buglehorn betw. three crescents sa.
6) Sa. two bars or, on a bend ar. three escallops gu.
7) (Ulishaven, co. Forfar). Motto—Per adversa virtus. Ar. a lion ramp. gu. Crest—A palm tree vert.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49