Lent Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lent Family Coat of Arms

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Lent Coat of Arms Meaning

Lent Name Origin & History

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Lent Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Lent blazon are the leaf, cross engrailed and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, gules and or .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. Sometimes the species or the part of tree was chosen as an allusion to the name of the bearer, as in Argent three tree stumps (also known as stocks) sable” for Blackstock 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309 Trees of course had long been venerated and its use in a coat of arms may have represented some association with the god Thor 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67. The pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 15A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.16The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lent Name

Lent Origin:

England, Ireland, Germany

Origins of Lent:

This unique and interesting surname listed as Lent, Lente, Lentt, Lanet and Lante, is considered to be English. It is thought to be an early ancient Christian nickname for an individual born in the religious duration of Lent, that is the 40 days between Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, and after the style of such surnames like Christmas, Nowell and even Trinity. Lent also means related to depression and starvation or difficulty, so it is imaginable that the surname has some other meanings. In 1880 one William Lent is registered in the Hundred Rolls of Oxford in 1273, and Willelmus Lenten in the census Tax rolls of Yorkshire in 1379. Recordings in the city of London from early records contain, Temperance Lante, the daughter of Richard Lante, named at the parish of St Peter-le-Poer in 1623, and Hengoe Lentt a naming assistance to his son also called Hengoe, at St Thomas the Apostle, in March 1675.

Variations:

More common variations are: Lenty, Leent, Lenti, Lento, Lenta, Lente, Lendt, Lenet, Lenot, Lenat.

England:

The origins of the surname Lent are found in Buckingham where people held a family seat from early times as Kings of the palace. The Saxon effects of English history declined after the war of Hastings in 1066. The language of the court was French for the next three centuries and after the Norman control. But Saxon surnames remained, and the family name first set down in the year 1275 when Clemence de Lentone held estates.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Alexander Doge, vicar of Dunnychtyne, dated about 1372, in the “holy register of Brechin”, Scotland. It was during the time of King Robert II of Scotland, dated 1371 – 1390. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as the Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Lent settled in the United States in four different centuries respectively in 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Lent who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Lent landed in Maryland in 1654.

Some of the people with the surname Lent who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Peter Lent who would eventually settle in Pennsylvania in the year 1762.

The following century saw much more Lent surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Lent who settled in the United States in the 19th century included W M Lent, A Lent, and J Lent arrived in San Francisco in the year 1851. Joseph Lent arrived in St Clair Division, III in 1866 and Francis J Lent came to Arkansas in 1891.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Lent who settled in Canada in the 18th century included John Lent who arrived in Parr Town, Saint John, New Brunswick about 1784.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lent: United States 5,311; England 226; Canada 282; Switzerland 45; Wales 68; Belgium 82; France 98; Brazil 159; Netherlands 261; Kazakhstan 48.

Notable People:

Abraham Lent (1789–1873), was a Nova Scotia congressman.

Abraham Lent (New York City) (1815–1882), was a politician in New York.

Arie van Lent was a Dutch-German football player.

Berkeley Lent was an American politician, and lawyer in the state of Oregon.

Blair Lent was an American writer and cartoonist of mostly Chinese-themed books.

Helmut Lent was a German soldier in World War II.

John Lent was a Canadian poet, and novel writer.

Michael Lent (visual artist), was a co-creator and administrator of Toby Room magazine.

Norman F. Lent was a traditional Republican representative of the United States House of Representatives from New York.

Willis Lent was an administrator in the United States Navy.

Lent Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lent family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (William Lent, temp. Edward III., quartered by Bury, of Culham, co. Oxford. Visit. Oxon, 1574). Quarterly, ar. and or, a cross engr. gu.
2) Vert a chev. erm. betw. three leaves ar. Crest—A horse pass. ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
15. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
16. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45