Lewis Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lewis Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Lewis Coat of Arms Meaning

Lewis Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Lewis. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

lewis coat of arms

Lewis Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Lewis blazon are the eagle, lion, dragon and cinquefoil. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, gules and azure .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 15A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Dragons have a long history in Heraldry and indeed have come to symbolise entire countries. Originally they were perhaps based on garbled descriptions of crocodiles given by returning travellers but soon developed a widely accepted representation. 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin Wade suggests that their appearance signifies “a most valiant defender of treasure”, a trait of dragons that we are still familiar with today. 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86

Lewis Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lewis Name

Lewis Origin:

Wales

Origins of Name:

The surname of Lewis comes from the Pre 5th Century Frankish personal name of “Hludwig” which itself comes from the element “hlud” which can be translated to mean “loud” or “famous” and “wig” which can be translated to mean “battle.” Thus, the personal name of “Hludwig” can be translated to mean “loud battle” or “famous battle.” Another possible origin for the surname of Lewis can be found in Welsh roots. It is believed that in Wales, the surname of Lewis was derived from an Anglicized form of the surname of Llewellyn. This name comes from the Welsh word “llyw” which can be translated to mean “leader” and the word “eilyn” which can be translated to mean “likeness.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Lewison, Levison, Lewies, Lewiss, Llewis, Lewise, Leewis, Lewisi, Leweis, Lewiis, Lewisy, Wlewis

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Lewis can be found in the country of England. One person by the name of Robert Lowis was named and recorded in the Pipe Rolls of Lancashire in the year of 1202. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one John, King of England, who was commonly known as and referred to throughout the ages as “John Lackland.” John, King of England, ruled from the year 1199 to the year 1216. Other mentions of the surname of Lewis in the country of England include William Lewys, who was recorded as being a witness in the 1267 Fines Court Rolls of the county of Suffolk.

United States of America:

Those who bear the surname of Lewis can be found throughout the United States of America. Those who bear this surname are found in this country because of the European Migration. The European Migration was a large movement of European citizens from the countries of their birth to the United States of America. These citizens emigrated out of the countries of their birth because of their disgruntled government. The living conditions in their home countries were not ideal, as lack of sanitation led to disease, and overcrowding spread these diseases further. Lack of land, jobs, or the ability to practice whatever religion they wanted also led to the dissatisfaction of European citizens. During the 1600’s many of these European citizens moved to the United States of America, which at that time, was known as The New World, and The Colonies. The first of these migrating peoples to bear the surname of Lewis was one person by the name of Roger Lewis, who landed in the state of Virginina in the year of 1623. In the year 1634, Edmond Lewis and John Lewis arrived in New England. Throughout the country, there is a large population of people who bear the surname of Lewis. The areas with the larger concentration of those who carry the surname of Lewis are the states of California, Texas, and Georgia, as well as New York, Ohio, and the state of Pennsylvania.

Australia and New Zealand:

In the 19th Century, it became common to explore new areas, such as New Zealand and Australia. One William Lewis, who was a convict from Shropshire, England, sailed aboard the ship named the Ann, in the year 1809, and settled in New South Wales, making him the first person in Australia to bear the surname of Lewis. Francis Charles Lewis arrived in Auckland, New Zealand in the year of 1840, which made him the first person who did carry the surname of Lewis into this new, undiscovered country.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lewis: United States 561,361; England 90,090; South Africa 34,208; Australia 32,386; Canada 32,285; Wales 25,105; Nigeria 25,065; Jamaica 16,634; Sierra Leone 10,030; Trinidad and Tobago 7,833

Notable People:

John Reilley Lewis (1944-2016) who was the founding conductor of the Washington Bach Consort who was also from America

Andrew Lindsay Lewis Jr. (1931-2016) who was a businessman and politician from America, who was also the 7th Secretary of Transportation in the United States from the year 1981 to the year 1983

Monica Lewis (1922-2015) who was born with the name May Lewis, and was a jazz singer from America, who was also a film actress and was the voice of Chiquita Banana

Miss Edith Lewis, who was a 2nd Class Passenger from New York, New York, who was aboard the RMS Lusitania during the sinking of the vessel, and survived the event

Mrs. Jane Lewis, who was a 2nd Class Passenger from New York, New York, who was aboard the RMS Lusitania during the sinking of the vessel, and survived the event

Mr. Isaac John Lewis, who was a 2nd Class Passenger from New York, New York, who was aboard the RMS Lusitania during the sinking of the vessel, and survived the event

Lewis Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lewis family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More lewis Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Harpton Court, co. Radnor, bart.). Motto—Expertus fidelem. Ar. a cross double parted and fretty sa., in the 1st and 4th quarters an eagle displ. gu., and in the 2nd and 3rd a lion ramp. of the eecond, ducally crowned or. Crest—On a cap of maintenance an heraldic tiger statant or.
2) (Brecon). Ar. a dragon’s head and neck erased vert, holding in the mouth a bloody hand ppr.
3) (Bristol and London). Sa. a chev. erm. betw. three spear's heads ar.
4) (Canterbury). Or, on a chief sa. three estoiles of the field. Crest—An ermine pass. ppr.
5) (Doncaster; confirmed 22 Oct. 1586). Sa. a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped or.
6) (Stoke, co. Dorset, and co. Somerset). Erm. on a fesse az. three boars’ heads couped ar. Crest—An antelope’s head erased sa. armed, attired, maned, tufted, and ducally gorged or.
7) (cos. Essex, Hertford, and York). Sa. a chev. betw. three trefoils ar. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, a plume of five ostrich feathers ar.
8) (Rossenden-in-Bleane, co. Kent). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three beavers’ tails ereet ppr. Crest—A demi beaver ppr.
9) (St. Pierre, co. Monmouth: descended through Philip Llewellen-ap-Ivor, second son of Llewellen, Lord of St. Clair and Tredegar, from Cadivor, Prince of Divet, co. Pembroke, temp. William I.). Motto—Ha persa la fide ha perso l’honore. Or, a lion ramp. guard. sa. Crest—A griffin segreant sa.
10) (The Van, co. Glamorgan; derived from Ivor ap Meurig, known in Welsh history as Ivor Bach, living temp. Henry II. The eventual heiress, Elizabeth, only dau. of Thomas Lewis, Esq., of The Van, m. Other, Earl of Plymouth). Motto—Patriae fidus. Also: (Lanishen Court, со. Monmouth, and Lanishen House, co. Glamorgan; both originally from Lewis, of Van). Sa. a lion ramp. ar. Crest—A lion sejant ar.
11) (Green Meadow, co. Glamorgan). Mottoes—Patriae fidus; and, Ofner na ofno angan. Quarterly, 1st, sa. a lion ramp. ar.; 2nd, sa. a chev. betw. three spear heads ar. embrued gu.; 3rd, sa. a chev. betw. three fleurs-de-lis or; 4th, or, on a quarter gu. two lions pass. guard. of the first. Crests—1st, Lewis: A lion sejant ar. 2nd, Price: A paschal lamb glorified or, bearing a pennon of St. George.
12) (Gilfach, co. Carmarthen). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a stag trippant ar. unguled and attired and bearing betw. his horns an imperial crown or; 2nd and 3rd, az. a chev. betw. three eagles’ heads erased or. Crest—A stag and an eagle’s head, as in the arms.
13) (Llanarehayron, co. Cardigan). Motto—Libertas. Gu. on a mount in fesse vert three towers triple-towered ar. betw. three scaling ladders or. Crest—Out of a mural coronet gu. a demi wolf saliant ar.
14) (Gwynfe, Wales). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, gu. a griffin segreant or, for Lewis, of South Wales; 2nd and 3rd, sa. three nags’ heads ar., for Lloyd. Crest—A demi griffin segreant couped or.
15) (Pengwerne, co. Merioneth). Erm. a saltire gu.
16) (co. Monmouth). Chequy or and sa. on a fesse gu. three leopards’ faccs jessant-de-lis of the first.
17) (Sutton Magna, co. Salop). Gu. a griffin segreant or. Crest—A demi griffin or.
18) (Malvern Hall, co. Warwick). Gu. three serpents nowed in triangle ar. within a bordure engr. or.
19) (Ledstone Hall and Marre, co. York, bart.; extinct). Motto—Spe tutiore armis. Sa. a chev. betw. three trefoils or. Crest, 1674—Out of a ducal coronet a plume of five ostrich feathers, two or and three sa. charged with a chev. of the first.
20) Vert a lion ramp. or. Crest—On a mount vert a greyhound couchant gu. collared or.
21) Az. a wolf ramp. ar. Crest—A demi wolf ramp. ar.
22) (Stanford, co. Nottingham). Ar. on a fesse az. three boars’ heads couped or, in chief a lion pass. gu. Crest—Out of a mural coronet or, a boar's head erect erm. langued gu.
23) Paly of six ar. and gu. on a chief az. a lion pass. ar. ducally crowned or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a greyhound sa. collared or.
24) Per pale indented az. and ar. three trefoils slipped counterchanged.
25) Ar. on a fesse az. three boars’ heads couped or, in chief a lion pass. gu.
26) Per fesse gu. and az. three bucks’ heads couped at the neck or.
27) (Clynfiew, co. Pembroke). Motto, in English—Be wise as a serpent, harmless as a dove. Gu. three serpents nowed in triangle ar. within a bordure engr. or. Crest—A nag’s head couped, bridled ppr.
28) (Hampton-Lewis, Bodior and Henllys. co. Anglesey). Motto—A Deo et rege. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a chev. sa. betw. three Cornish choughs ppr. in the beak of each an erm. spot, for Lewis, 2nd and 3rd, gu. on a chev. betw. three bucks’ heads cabossed ar. a crescent of the field for diff., for Roberts, of Bodior; 2nd and 3rd quarters, Hampton, gu. on a fesse or, betw. a mullet in chief and an escallop in base ar. three martlets sa. Crests—1st, Lewis: A Cornish chough ppr. in the dexter claw a fleur-de-lis az.; 2nd, Hampton: A wivern amidst bulrushes ppr.
29) (Lampeter Velfry, co. Pembroke). Motto—Sors est contra me. Az. a chev. erm. betw. three garbs. Crest—An arm embowed holding an arrow.
30) (Thomas Lewis, Dublin; impalement Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1656, of his son-in-law, Walter Carwarden). Sa. three scaling ladders ar. in chief an eagle displ. of the last.
31) (John Lewis, Esq., of Prescoed, whose only dau. and heir m. Col. Marcus Trevor, created, 1662, Viscount Dungannon; impalement Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office of Lord Dungannon, d. Jan. 1669). Az. a chev. betw. three lions ramp. or.
32) (confirmed to Arthur Gambell Lewis, Esq., of Seatown, co. Dublin, and Clanamully, co. Monaghan). Motto—Bidd llu hebb llydd. Sa. on a chev. erm. betw. three spear heads ar. a crescent gu. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet ppr. a plume of five ostrich feathers alternately gu. and az. charged with a chev. or, thereon a crescent gu.
33) (Kilcullen, co. Kildare, and Grosvenor Street, Grosvenor Square, London). Motto—Bidd llu hebb llydd. Same Arms, a mullet gu. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet ppr. a plume of five ostrich feathers alternately gu. and az. charged with a chev. or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
15. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P86