Leyland Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Leyland Family Coat of Arms

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Leyland Coat of Arms Meaning

Leyland Name Origin & History

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Leyland Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Leyland blazon are the barley, escallop, lion and rose. The four main tinctures (colors) are sable, or, argent and azure.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Many items found in the natural world occur in coats of arms, including many plants that people of the middle ages would be familiar with. Several varities of bush and small plants frequently found in the hedgerows beside fields can be observed 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270, in addition to the famous thistle of Scotland 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P147. The barley is a an example of such a plant, instantly recognisable to those in the mediaeval period and likely a symbol of the land and a farming heritage.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 17Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 18Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 19A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 20The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Leyland Name

Leyland Origin:

England

Origins of Leyland:

This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is geographical from Leyland, in Lancashire, which means neglected or uncultivated land, from the Olde English pre-7th Century “laegeland” and the Middle English “layland.” The place name itself noted as “Lailand” in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Leilandia” in the Lancashire Pipe Rolls, near the year 1160 and “Leylond” in the Lancashire Assize Rolls of 1246. The surname may also acquire from Ealand in Lincolnshire, from the Olde English “ealand,” which means island, land by water. Walter de Leilande introduced in the Pipe Rolls of Lincolnshire in 1205. Finally, the surname may be geographical for a resident by the fallow or untilled land from the Olde English word “laege,” which means unseeded. Robert de Layland noted in the 1219 Assize Rolls of Yorkshire, while the “Calendar of Plea and Memoranda City of London,” shows William de Leylond in 1339. A notable name ancestor was Joseph Bentley Leyland (1811 – 1851), an artist, whose most important works contain a representation of Dr. Beckwith of York, in York Minister and a group of African Bloodhounds.

Variations:

More common variations are: Lewyland, Leland, Lyland, Layland, Leeland, Lealand, Leylend, Loyland, Lieland, Lehland.

England:

The origins of the surname Leyland appeared in Lancashire where people held a family seat from old times. Someone say better before the success of Normans and the entrance of Duke William at Hastings 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Aldulf de Leilande, dated about 1203, in the “Feet of Fines of Kent.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199-1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Leyland had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Leyland landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Leyland who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Leyland, who came to Virginia in 1698.

Individuals with the surname Leyland who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Thomas Leyland came to Philadelphia in 1751.

The following century saw more Leyland surnames come. Some of the people with the name Leyland who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas Leyland, who arrived in Washington County, Pennsylvania in the year 1882.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Leyland who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Joseph Leyland, an English prisoner from Middlesex, who shifted aboard the “Arab” in February 1834, settling in Van Diemen‘s Land, Australia.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Leyland: England 3,393; United States 669; South Africa 657; Canada 423; Australia 308; New Zealand 227; Scotland 151; France 147; Wales 102; Hong Kong 47.

Notable People:

Carl Sonny Leyland is a boogie woogie, blues, and Jazz artist. He was born in 1965 near Southampton, England, but as a child moved to American music. At age 15, he found Boogie Woogie and was inspired to make the piano his career.

Frederick Richards Leyland (September 1831–January 1892) was one of the largest British shipowners, running 25 steamships in the oceanic trade. He was also a major art collector, who nominated works from many of the Pre-Raphaelite painters.

James Richard “Jim” Leyland was born in December 1944. He is a retired Major League Baseball director.

Joseph Bentley Leyland (1811-1851), was an English artist.

Kellie-Ann Leyland (born 1986), was a British football player.

Mal Leyland (born 1945), was an Australian scientist and film-maker.

Maurice Leyland (1900-1967), was an English cricket player.

Mike Leyland (1941-2009), was an Australian scientist and film-maker.

Paul Leyland was a British mathematician.

Leyland Family Gift Ideas

Browse Leyland family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Morley, co. Lancaster; Anne, dau. and heir of Thomas Leyland, m. Edward Tyldesley, of Tyldesley). Ar. on a fess sa. a lion pass. betw. two escallops of the field, in chief nine ears of barley gu. three, three, and three, each placed one in pale and two in saltire, and banded with a string or. Crest—A demi dove ar. wings endorsed az. in the beak three ears of wheat or.
2) (The Grange, Hindley, near Wigan, co. Lancaster; John Leyland, Esq., fifth in descent from James Leyland, Esq. d. 1679, seized of an estate in Ashton-in-Makerfield, same co.). Per fess sa. and barry wavy of six ar. and az. in chief nine ears of wheat or, three, three, and three, banded gu. Crest—On a mount vert amid flags a corn-crake all ppr. in tbe beak three ears of wheat or.
3) (co. Lancaster). Motto—God feedeth ye land. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, or, on a bend sa. a lion pass. ar. in chief three roses gu.; 2nd and 3rd, ar. two swords in saltire sa.
4) (co. Lancaster). Ar. on a fesse sa. a lion betw. two crescents of the field.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P147
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
17. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
19. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
20. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60