Ligon Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Ligon Family Coat of Arms

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Ligon Coat of Arms Meaning

Ligon Name Origin & History

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Ligon Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Ligon blazon are the lion passant and chequy. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and azure .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion passant is an example of these modified form, showing the creature on all fours, as if walking proudly. In common with all reprensentations of the lion it can be taken to be an “emblem of deathless courage”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Ligon Name

Ligon Origin:

Poland, England, France

Origins of Ligon:

The surname of Ligon is said to have many possible origins from which it was derived. The first possible origin of the surname of Ligon is that it was a name given to the aristocracy in England, who had migrated from France to England. The second possible origin of the surname of Ligon is that it is a patronymic name, meaning that the original bearer of the surname of Ligon was the son, grandson, or direct male descendant of a person who was well-known and notable within the community from which the name derived. Patronymic names often added the suffix of “-son” to the end of the male ancestor’s name, which was later shortened to the addition of an “-s.” In the country of Ireland, patronymic surnames often began with “O” or “Mac” to denote the meaning of “son of.” In the country of France, an “L” was added to the beginning of the male descendant’s name to denote “son of.” In the case of the surname of Ligon, it is believed that in France, this surname was a shortened, Anglicized version of the surname of “L’Higon.” The last possible origin of the surname of Ligon is that it was used as a nickname in the country of Poland. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Ligon, the original bearers of this surname were people within a town or community who were known to lie, coming from the Old Polish word of “ligac” which can be translated to mean “to lie,” or “to kick up a fuss.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Liggon, Ligono, Leigon, Ligony, Ligona, Ligone, Laigon, Liguon, Ligoon, Ligoni

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Ligon can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of Ligon held a seat as a Lord of the Maor in Worcestershire in the year of 1066. This record was created under the reign of one King William I of England, who was known throughout the ages and commonly referred to as one “William the Conqueror.” King William I of England ruled from the year of 1066 to the year of 1087.

United States of America:

The first Ligon in America was one Thomas Ligon, who arrived in Virginia in the year of 1642.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Ligon: United States 7,481; Phillipines 5,220; Germany 202; Belgium 52; Canada 34; United Arab Emirates 31; Indonesia 26; Singapore 24; England 16; Australia 15; Thailand 6

Notable People:

Jim “Goose” Ligon (1944-2004) who was a professional basketball player from America.

William Austin Ligon, who served as the co-founder and retired CEO of CarMax Inc. and who was from America.

Robert Fulwood Ligon (1823-1901) who served as a Member of the Alabama State House of Representatives in the year of 1849, served as a Member of the Alabama State Senate in the year of 1861, and served as the 4th Lieutenant Governor of the state of Alabama from the year of 1874 to the year of 1876, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Robert Fulwood Ligon Jr. (born in 1864) who served as the Mayor of Tuskegee, Alabama in the year of 1886 to the year of 1888, and who served as the Adjutant General of the state of Alabama from the year of 1896 to the year of 1899, and who served as the Clerk of the Alabama Supreme Court from the year of 1899 to the year of 1916, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

C. R. Ligon, who served as the Delegate to the Republican National Convention from the state of Mississippi in the year of 1912, and who was a Republican politician from America.

Ligon Family Gift Ideas

Browse Ligon family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Upton, St. Leonard’s, co. Gloucester, and Madresfield, co. Worcester). Ar. two lions pass. in pale gu. (another, sa.). Crest—A Saracen’s head ppr. wreathed about the temples ar. and gu. Another Crest—An old man’s head ppr. hair and beard sa.
2) Chequy ar. and az. a fesse gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P61
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100