Loch Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Loch Family Coat of Arms

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Loch Coat of Arms Meaning

Loch Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Loch. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Loch Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Loch blazon are the saltire engrailed and swan. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, sable and azure .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The saltire, whilst frequently associated with Scotland is actually a widely used and popular ordinary found throughout all of British Heraldry, perhaps because of its cross-like form 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 42. In order to allow for clear differences between similar arms, heralds designed a series of decorative edges, not all of them are appropriate for the saltire (because of the interior angles) but those are suitable can be very effective artistically. The pattern engrailed works well here. It is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

Wade suggests that the appearance of a swan in a coat of arms is perhaps an indication of a musical person, or a “ lover of poetry and harmony”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78 It is generally shown in a lifelike aspect and colouring, although it may be leaked and legged with other colours. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan. It is a popular charge, both on the shield itself and impress, sometimes sitting and sometimes rising as if about to take off in flight. 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Loch Name

Loch Origin:

England, Germany, Scotland

Origins of Loch:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the surname, this interesting and unusual name was listed as Loch and Lough. It is Scottish but from the 17th century as Lough, it is also well noted in Northern Ireland. It is habitational and shows to explain a resident by a lake, generally a water filled Dale, sometimes connected with the sea. Probably, surprisingly as both Scotland and Ireland are full of lakes, and according to Black’s Surnames of Scotland, the name is said to have a particular place of origin. If correct, this is Portmore Loch in the church of Eddleston in Peebleshire. Originally, the first documentation is from this region with that Reginald of the Loch who for some reason gave up his marriage and his estates in about 1214. Other recordings of that time contain as Walterus de Lacu, a name recording which is a combination of Latin, French and Old English, a witness to a document confirming lands to the priest of Neubotle in the year 1230 A.D., although this seems to have nothing to do with the old estate loss. However, it looks like for the next two centuries, the family wanted to regain their lands, although without much success. In 1296, one Malise de Loughs was taken by conflict by the English and held in Dunbar Castle. Apparently, he was of some value, because he was allowed “monies.” Finally in the 17th-century named ancestors got the estates of Drylaw in Midlothian, and also the estates of Rachan in Peebleshire.

Variations:

More common variations are: Louch, Loach, Loech, Wloch, Loc’h, Hloch, Looch, Lyoch, Loach.

England:

The surname Loch first appeared in England, where the name Loken was recorded for its many occurances in that area.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Loch had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Loch settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Loch who settled in the United States in the 18th century included George Loch, who settled in Louisiana in the year 1722 with his wife and children. Jacob Loch, Johanis Loch at the age of 16 and Johannes Loch, all landed in Pennsylvania in the same year 1739. Anna Elisabetha Loch, who arrived in Pennsylvania in the year 1749.

The following century saw much more Loch surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Loch who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Henry Loch came to America in 1850. Friedrich Loch, who arrived in Ohio in 1852. Christ Loch and Johann Andreas Wilhelm Loch, both landed in America in the same year 1854. Heinrich Jakob Loch, who came to Brazil in the year 1855.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Loch: Cambodia 5,277; Brazil 4,150; Germany 4,102; United States 2,905; Poland 1,098; France 453; Kenya 392; Guatemala 369; Australia 360; Chile 342.

Notable People:

George Loch of Drylaw (1749-1788), was an Edinburgh land-holder.

James Loch (1780–1855), was a Scottish estate minister and after that representative of Parliament

John Loch (1781–1868), was a Chairperson of the East India Company.

George Loch (1811–1887), was a representative of Parliament.

Henry Loch, 1st Baron Loch (1827–1900), was a Scottish fighter and colonial administrator.

Edward Loch, 2nd Baron Loch (1873–1942), was a senior British Army officer.

Joice NanKivell Loch (1887–1982), was an Australian writer and scholar.

Kenneth Loch (1890–1961), was an assistance-General, a Scottish fighter and defense planner.

Tam Dalyell was born as Thomas Dalyell Loch, was a Scottish leader and Labor representative of Parliament from the year 1962 to 2005.

Samuel Loch was born in June 1983. He is an Australian rower. He got his early education and rowed at both the King’s School in Sydney and Princeton University from which he graduated in 2006.

Loch Family Gift Ideas

Browse Loch family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Drylaw, co. Edinburgh). Motto—Assiduitate, non desidia. Or, a saltire engr. sa. betw. two swans naiant in fesse in a loch ppr. Crest—A swan with wings endorsed devouring a perch both ppr.
2) (Scotland, 16th century). Az. a saltire engr. betw. three swans naiant in lochs ppr. two in the flanks and one in base.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 42
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P78
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Swan
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P245