Loder Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Loder Family Coat of Arms

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Loder Coat of Arms Meaning

Loder Name Origin & History

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Loder Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Loder blazon are the escallop, annulet and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and ermine .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Loder Name

Loder Origin:

England

Origins of Loder:

It is a unique and interesting name, listed with the surname spellings of Loader, Lodder, Loder, Loades, Loadsman, Loadman, etc. and, has two possible sources. The first of which is an Anglo-Saxon geographical name mentioning a person who existed by a road or a stream. The origin is from the Olde English pre 7th Century word “slave,” itself acquired from the verb “laedan,” which means to guard or to go. Where the word “lad” is a component of a place name, it frequently relates to an artificial waste channel. The second possible origin is from the old professional surname for transport or Carter, acquired from the Middle English “lode(n)” to transport or carry, acquired from ‘lad’ as above determined by “lade(n),” which means to load. Early examples of the surname registrations contain one Simon Le Lodere, in Warwickshire in the year 1332, and John ate Lode in Sussex in 1327. John Lademan shows in the premium Rolls of York in 1301, while Annys Loadman, the daughter of Robert Loadman, named at the famous parish of St. Botolph without Aldergate, London, in July 1610.

Variations:

More common variations are: Loader, Lodder, Lowder, Louder, Louder, Lodera, Lodter, Loderi, Lodero, Loider.

England:

The surname Loder first appeared in Dorset where they held a family seat as kings of the estates. After the Battle of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having controlled over King Harold, gave most of Britain to his many successful Barons.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Emma la Lodere, dated about 1279, in the “Oxfordshire Hundred Rolls.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Loder had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Loder landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Loder who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Anton Loder, who arrived in St Mary, Pennsylvania in 1847. Pearl Loder who settled in America from Sherbourne, in 1892. Jacob Loder shifted to the United States, in 1893. Maria Loder, who moved to America, in 1893.

The following century saw more Loder surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Loder who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Nils Loder landed in America, in 1902. Alice L. Loder came to the United States, in 1903. Francis H. Loder moved to the United States from London, in 1904. Arthur Loder moved to the United States from London, in 1906. Ethel Lydia Loder landed in America from London, England, in 1907.

Canada:

People with the surname Loder who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Jacob Loder U.E. (b. 1746) who settled in Sheffield Sunbury Division, New Brunswick near the year 1784, he died in 1817.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Loder who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Joseph Loder, Mary Loder and Edward Loder, all arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Sultana” in the same year 1851.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Loder: United States 2,162; Canada 959; Germany 706; England 575; Australia 371; Austria 314; South Africa 256; Brazil 95; Switzerland 90; Wales 90.

Notable People:

Anne Marie Loder (born 1969), is a Canadian actress.

David Loder (born 1964), is an English racehorse manager.

Edward Loder (1809–1865), was an English musician and conductor.

George Loder (1816–1868), was an English writer and director, cousin of Edward Loder

Gerald Loder, 1st Baron Wakehurst (1861–1936), was a British lawyer, business person, and political leader.

Loder Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Erm. on a fesse three escallops. Crest—A stag's head couped at the neck, betw. the horns a cross crosslet.
2) Sa. six annulets, three and three in pale or.
3) Sa. ten bezants, four, three, two, and one.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122