Lodge Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lodge Family Coat of Arms

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Lodge Coat of Arms Meaning

Lodge Name Origin & History

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Lodge Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Lodge blazon are the lion and border flory. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and argent .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 11A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The border, (sometimes bordure) is a band running around the edge of the shield, following the edge contours and being differently coloured, possibly holding a series of small charges placed on top of it 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bordure. To distinguish it from similar arms, heraldic artists developed a series of decorative edges (obviously these are applied only to the inner edge). Flory, we should not be surprised to find, refers to flowery, specifically the appearance of the stylised representation of the fleur-de-lys (lily flower) at key points 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Flory. We also find the terms floretty, fleury and similar spellings used in the same way. These flower symbols usually occur at corners, or in the case of items with long straight edges, small versions may appear spaced at regular intervals.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lodge Name

Lodge Origin:

England

Origin of Lodge:

The Lodge surname is Ancient English in origin and a locational name deriving from an apartment in a small house or brief residence. The foundation of this surname is associated with the Middle English (1200 – 1500) word “logge,” an advancement of the ancient French word “loge,” which means “room” the area to take rest. The phrase “logge” was specifically used for a portion raised by workers living on the site of a project, like a parish or temple, and frequently has been a kind of professional nickname for a worker. The Middle English “atte Logge,” combined with a particular name, usually represented the guardian of the builders or worker’s lodge. Previous examples of the particular surname consist of Adam atte Logge (Suffolk, 1327), Johannes del Loge (Yorkshire, 1379) and Thomas Lodge (the Oxford University Register, 1520).

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Llodge, Loadge, Ledge, Ludge, Ladge, Lidge, Lodgi, Lodgy, Lodgeway, Lidgey.

England:

The name Lodge first originated in Suffolk where they held a family seat from ancient times and were given an estate by Duke William of Normandy, their faithful king, for their distinguished services at the campaign of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Roger de la Logge, which was dated 1304, in the “Close Rolls of London.” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be “The Hammer of the Scots,” 1272 – 1307. The origin of surnames during that period became a basic requirement for the determination of personal taxation. It was famous as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country started to develop, with unique and shocking spelling differentiation of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Lodge settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in 17th and 19th. Some of the people with the name Lodge who settled in the United States in the 17th century included William Lodge at the age of 13, who landed in Barbados in 1635. Thomas Lodge landed in Virginia in 1637. George Lodge settled in Virginia in 1638. George Lodge arrived in Maryland or Virginia in 1661 and Henry Lodge, who came to Maryland in 1661.

Some of the people with the name Lodge who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Joseph Lodge, who arrived in New York in 1833. John Lodge, who landed in New York in 1845. Catherine Lodge at the age of 24, Susan Lodge at the age 26, and William Lodge at the age of 21, all arrived in New York in the same year in 1849.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Lodge who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mathew Lodge and Mathew Lodge at the age of 20; both arrived in Fort Cumberland Nova Scotia in the same year 1775.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Lodge who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Robert Lodge arrived in New South Wales, Australia sometime between 1825 and 1832. Charles Lodge at the age of 26 arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Taymouth Castle.” Elijah Lodge at the age of 22 and Stephen Lodge at the of 32, both arrived in South Australia in the same year in 1859 aboard the ship “James Jardin.”

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Lodge who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Lodge at the age of 31 and Harriett Lodge, at the age of 27 both arrived in Wellington, New Zealand in the same year in 1840 aboard the ship “Aurora.” John Lodge landed in Wellington, New Zealand in 1840 aboard the ship Aurora.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lodge: United States 5,513; England 8,147; Malawi 1,956; Zambia 1,355; Kenya 1,020; Philippines 773; Australia 1,753; Canada 1,220; New Zealand 611; South Africa 4,036.

Notable People:

Alexander Lodge (1881–1938), was a famous British engineer.

Carron O Lodge (c. 1883 – 1910), was a British personality and painter.

David Lodge (author) (born 1935), is a British writer.

Jimmy Lodge (1895–1971), was an English football player.

Oliver W F Lodge (1878–1955), was a famous poet and writer.

Sir Richard Lodge (1855–1936), was a professor.

Lodge Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lodge family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Sir Thomas Lodge, Lord Mayor of London, 1562). Az. a lion ramp. ar. crusily fitchee gu. within a bordure flory of the second. Crest—A demi lion ramp. couped sa. holding in the paws a cross pattée fitchée gu.
2) (London). Az. a lion ramp. ar. crusily gu. within a tressure of demi fleurs-de-lis and a bordure of the second.
3) (Nettlested, co. Suffolk). (co. Salop). Gu. a lion ramp. ar. within a bordure flory or.
4) Az. a lion ramp. within a double tressure flory counterflory or. Crest—A lion double queued az.
5) (Leeds, co. York). Per fesse gu. and sa. a lion ramp. ar. semée of crosses crosslet of the first.
6) Per bend sinister sa. and ar. crusily and a lion ramp. all counterchanged.
7) (Bodsilin, co. Carnarvon; as borne by Adam Lodge, Esq., Barrister-at-law, whose poetic works are well known). Az. a lion ramp. ar. semee of crosses pattee fitchee gn. within a bordure of the second charged with eight fleurs-de-lis of the third. Crest—A demi lion erased sa. semee of fleurs-delis or, supporting a cross pattee fitchee gu.
8) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1607, Joan, dau. of George Lodge, and wife of Rslph Grimesdich, Farmer of the Customs of the port of Dublin). Per bend sinister ar. and sa. crusillée fitchée a lion ramp. counterchanged, armed and langued gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
11. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bordure
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Flory