• step01
  • step02
  • step03
  • step04
step 01
step 02
step 03
step 04

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Per pale ar. and sa. a chev. betw. three millrinds counterchanged. Crest—A sphinx couchant guard. wings endorsed.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Lowdell Coat of Arms and Family Crest

We don't yet have this section of research completed for this name. If you are interested in being notified when research becomes available, please use this form to contact us and we will let you know as soon as we have something!

Lowdell Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Lowdell blazon are the millrind, chevron and sphinx. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5.

The mill-rind, also known by a rather surprising number of names (fer-de-moline, inkmoline, mill-ink amongst others) is a distinctive symbol, but hard to place by modern viewers. It is a square or diamond shape with arms extending above and below and in fact represents the piece of iron that connects a circular timber axle to a mill-stone, used for grinding corn. 6 These would obviously have been more familiar to those of the middle ages than they are today.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 7, or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.8. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 9, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 10 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The sphinx Is a typical example of a mythical creature, taking the form that we still recognise today. Wade suggests that it symbolises ”omniscience and secrecy”. 11

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 2 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 4 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 5 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 6 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fer-de-moline
  • 7 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
  • 8 The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
  • 9 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
  • 10 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
  • 11 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P87