Lower Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lower Family Coat of Arms

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Lower Coat of Arms Meaning

Lower Name Origin & History

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Lower Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Lower blazon are the rose, chevron, unicorn and oak leaf. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.9The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The unicorn is an intresting example that is still part of our own mythology today. The unicorn as illustrated on even the most ancient coat of arms is still instantly recognisable to us today, and shares many of the same poses that both lions and horses can be found in. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn. Wade, the 18th century heraldic writer suggested that were adopted as symbols because of “its virtue, courage and strength”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lower Name

Lower Origin:

England, Germany

Origin of Lower:

This surname is listed with various forms such as Lewer, Lower, and this name is derived from the word Lowers or Lowerson. It is an English name. This surname holds two possible origins. The first origin is associated with an old professional surname for a servant or supplier of water, it means the man who provided water at a table to guests for washing their hand. The foundation of this surname derives from the Middle English word ‘ewer’, itself deriving from the pre 10th century Norman French l’evier’, the surname forms with an addition of ‘L’ phrase expressing the combined phrase ‘le’. Furthermore, the surname is perhaps in English form from the old Welsh name ‘Llywerch’, a name which is the combination of two words “IIyw” and “March”. The word “IIyw” means Ruler or Leader and the word “march” means progression or a horse and maybe it similar to the French Mareschall or English Marshall. It is considered that the surname from this origin is especially related with Cornwall. Jone Lowers, was named at St Margarets, Westminster, in June 1547, and the wedding of Hercules Lower and Lore Aleigh listed at Lanreath, Cornwall, in January 1597.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Lowery, Lowere, Loewer, Lowaer, Lowerr, Lowyer, Lowera, Loywer, Louwer, Lowear, etc

Germany:

The name Lower firstly appeared in Bohemia, where the lower family became a well-known donator to the monarchy from old times. Lower family always played a vital role in the field of social responsibilities; the family appeared an essential part of that area as it developed to form relations with another family under the Feudal System and the nation. One of the first is listed as Bohemian holders of the name was Hensel Lebel, who lived in Budweis in 1317.

England:

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Richard Lewer, which was dated 1219, in the Fees Court Rolls of Surrey. It was during the time of King Henry III of England, 1216 – 1272. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Lower settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Lower who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Christianna Lower, Elisabeth Lower, Elizabeth Lower, Andreas Lower and Johannes Lower, all of these people arrived in Pennsylvania in 1732.

Some of the individuals with the name Lower who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Jonas Friedrich Lower, who arrived in America in 1836. John Lower, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1838. Martin Lower at the age of 17, arrived in New York in 1854 and Susanne Caroline Lower, who landed in America in 1857.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Lower who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Frederick W. Lower, at the age 24, arrived in South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Cheapside” in 1849. F.W. Lower arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Cheapside” in 1849. Matthew Lower at the age of 64, arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “Trafalgar”. Alfred Lower at the age of 25 and Matthew Lower at the age of 23 both arrived in South Australia in 1854 aboard the ship “Emigrant”.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lower: United States 5,324; England 989; Poland 239; Argentina 224; Australia 299; Brazil 143; Canada 252; Germany 975; Turkey 140; New Zealand 78.

Notable People:

Cyrus B. Lower (1843–1924), was an American Medal of Honor recipient.

Geoffrey Lower (born 1963), was a famous American artist and entertainer. He was famous for performing as Reverend Timothy Johnson on Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman. He also performed as Monica’s boyfriend Alan in Friends in season one, episode three.

Oswald Bertram Lower (1863–1925), was an Australian entomologist.

Richard Lower (physician) (1631–1691), was a Cornish doctor who experimented with blood transmission.

Robert A. Lower (1844–1918), was an American Civil War Medal of Honor recipient.

Lower Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lower family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (St. Winnow Barton, Polmawgan, Tremeere, and Lezant, co. Cornwall; thirteen generations in Visit. 1620). Sa. a chev. betw. three roses ar. Crest—A unicorn’s head erased quarterly ar. and sa. Another Crest—A unicorn’s head erased ar.
2) (St. Tudy, co. Cornwall). Same Arms. Crest—A unicorn’s head erased ar. crined and armed or.
3) (Trelaske, co. Cornwall; Thomas Lower, son of Peter Lower, and grandson of Thomas Lower, all of same place. Visit. Cornwall, 1620). Sa. a chev. betw. three roses ar. (another, field az. chev. engr. roses or). Crest—A unicorn's head erased ar.
4) (co. Devon). Sa. three oak leaves ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
9. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Unicorn
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P85