Luck Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Luck Family Coat of Arms

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Luck Coat of Arms Meaning

Luck Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Luck. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Luck Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Luck blazon are the mascle, greyhound, mural crown and hawk. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and sable .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The mascle is a close relative of the lozenge or diamond shape, but with the centre cut away revealing the background underneath. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle. Guillim, writing in the 17th century reckoned the mascle to represent the mesh of a net, being the biblical symbol for “persuasion, whereby men are induced to virtue and verity”. 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

Crowns are frequently observed in Heraldry 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184, but we should not make the mistake of assuming that these are always on Royal arms 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138. Many of the orders of nobility across Europe were entitled to wear crowns and coronets, Dukes, Earls, Viscounts and Barons in England each had their own distinctive headwear 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350. The mural crown exhibits decoration rather like brickwork, and has battlements on top. It is said to have been award by the Roman legions to the first who breached the walls of a besieged town or fortress. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P142

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Luck Name

Origins of Luck:
This unusual surname acquires from the given name “Lucas”, a Latin form of the Greek “Loucas” meaning man from Lucania.  Lucania was a region of Southern Italy that was perhaps originally named in an Italic dialect with a word meaning bright, shining.  The Latin form of the name, Lucas, was a great favorite as a particular name in the Middle Ages, due in part to the reputation of St. Luke the Evangelist. St. Luke was a doctor and a painter, and there is an old suggestion that the name means “a patient person”.  Lucas is held to be the learned form of Luke and is found in France in the same spelling, from where it may be locational from Luick in Flanders, for example, Lucas de Luke shows in the Pipe Rolls of London (1274). London Church Recordings list the marriage of Christopher Lucas to Margaret Medcalfe, in January 1571 at St. Botolph’s, Bishopsgate.

Variations:
More common variations are: Lucke, Luick, Lucky, Lauck, Louck, Lueck, Lucka, Lucki, Luckh.

England:
The surname Luck first appeared in Berwickshire where they held a family seat from old times and their first records appeared on the early poll rolls taken by the early Kings of Britain to manage the rate of taxation of their subjects.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Euerard Lucas, dated 1153, in the “Records of the Templars in England in the 12th century”. It was during the reign of King Stephen, who was known as Count of Blois”, dated 1135-1154.  Surname all over the country became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.  It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

United States of America:
Some of the people with the name Luck who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Luck, who settled in Virginia in 1634.  William Luck settled in Virginia in 1634.  Robert Luck, aged 25, landed in Virginia in 1635.  William Luck, who landed in Virginia in 1658.  Thomas Luck, who landed in Virginia in 1664.

People with the surname Luck who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Seutik Luck at the age of 37, arrived in Pennsylvania in 1733.  Christoph Luck, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1751.  Georg Luck, who landed in Pennsylvania in the year 1770.  Jacob Luck, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1770.  Johan Philip Luck, who arrived in Pennsylvania in the year 1773.

The following century saw more Luck surnames arrive.  Some of the people with the surname Luck who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Joseph, Luck Jr., who landed in America in 1830.  Joachim Luck, who landed in America in 1839.  Christian Philipp Luck, who landed in Texas in 1844.  Bernard Luck, aged 20, arrived in New Orleans, La in 1845.  Antone Luck, aged 24, landed in New Orleans, La in 1845.

Canada:
Some of the people with the surname Luck who arrived in the Canada in the 20th century included Adam Luck, aged 4, arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1902.  Adolf Luck, aged 4, landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1902.  Adolf Luck, aged 15, arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1902.  August Luck, aged 6, arrived in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1902.  August Luck, aged 17, landed in Halifax, Nova Scotia in 1902

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Luck who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Thomas Luck, aged 31, arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship “Fatima.”

New-Zealand:
Some of the population with the surname Luck who came in New Zealand in the 19th century included Thomas Luck arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Empress” in 1865.

Luck Family Gift Ideas

Browse Luck family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Rotherfield, co. Sussex; confirmed by Segar, Garter). Erm. five mascles in fesse betw. three greyhounds’ heads erased sa. Crest—A pelican wings elevated endorsed sa. betw. the circumference of two branches vert.
2) Az. three mural crowns or. Crest—A hawk hooded and belled, perched on the stump of a tree all ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Mascle
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P234
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P184
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P138
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P350
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P142