Lye Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lye Family Coat of Arms

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Lye Coat of Arms Meaning

Lye Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Lye. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Lye Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Lye blazon are the lion couchant, wing, crescent and fleur-de-lis. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and azure .

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.1The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.The phrase couchant indicates a sleeping lion, though no less a fearsome creature for being so! 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion

Wings are frequently observed in coats of arms. Unless otherwise specified they should be shown as eagle’s wings, with a realistic appearance. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wing They can appear singly or in pairs, in which form they are very often found in the crest, which rests above the shield in a full achievement of arms. Wade, quoting Quillim, suggests that the use of the wing on the shield signifies “celerity and protection or covering”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P73

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 17A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lye Name

Lye Origin:

England

Origins of Lye:

This name is of English locational origin from any of the many places named with the Olde English pre 7th Century component “leah” translating differently as “an open place in the wood, a glade or low-lying pasture.” Examples are Lee in Buckinghamshire, Hampshire, Essex, Kent, and Shropshire, also Lea in Cheshire, Lincolnshire, Wiltshire, etc. The name may also be geographic for someone who lived by a meadow or clearing. The surname first noted in the mid-12th Century. One, Turqod de la Lea shows in the 1193 “Pipe Rolls of Warwickshire” and a Richard de la Lee in the 1273 “Hundred Rolls of Wiltshire.” In January 1564, Ales Lea named in Bebington, Cheshire and in August 1590, Ann Lea married Thomas Millington in Frodsham, Cheshire. New alternatives of the name include Lea, Leah, Lay(e) and Lye(s).

Variations:

More common variations are: Laye, Loye, Leye, Lyee, Lyoe, Liye, Luye, Lyeo, Lyeu, Lywe.

England:

The surname Lye first appeared in Cheshire, at High Leigh, where the name is from “an important family, who for centuries in that division nearly all the gentry families of that name claim decline.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Ailric de la Leie, dated about 1148, in the “Early Northamptonshire Charters,” Huntingdonshire. It was during the time of King Stephen who was known to be the “Count of Blois,” dated 1135 – 1154. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Lye landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Lye who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Robert Lye, who landed in Lynn, Massachusetts in 1638. John Lye, who arrived in Maryland in 1660.

People with the surname Lye who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Stephen Lye, Fredrick Lye and Anderas Lye, all landed in Pennsylvania in 1753.

The following century saw more Lye surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Lye who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Robert Q Lye, who arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1866.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Lye who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Alfred Lye arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Sea Park.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Lye who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included T. Lye arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “William Watson” in 1859.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lye: Malaysia 11,054; Singapore 3,194; SriLanka 1,695; England 1,167; Australia 787; United States 561; Canada 426; New Zealand 277; Taiwan 232; Hong Kong 214.

Notable People:

Len Lye was a New Zealand-born artist.

Lye Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lye family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (cos. Wilts and Hereford). Or, three lions couchant gu. Crest—An eagle displ. ar. beaked and legged gu.
2) Per pale gu. and az. two wings conjoined ar.
3) Ar. a fess fusily sa. betw. three crescents gu.
4) Ar. a bend fusily sa. betw. six crescents gu.
5) Ar. a fleur-de-lis sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Lion
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wing
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P73
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106