Lynch Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Lynch Family Coat of Arms

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Lynch Coat of Arms Meaning

Lynch Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Lynche.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Lynch. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Lynch Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Lynch blazon are the trefoil, chevron and lynx. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 8A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries. The inverted ‘V’ of the chevron is perhaps thought to have originated to represent a military scarf folded on the shield 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various), or additional cross-pieces used to strengthen the shield and painted a different colour.10The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859. It has also acquired the meaning of “Protection… granted… to one who has achieved some notable enterprise” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45, possibly becuase of its resemblance to the roof truss of a house.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? Nevertheless, real animals 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 are perhaps one of the most common sights on coats of arms, especially animals of European origin. The panther Is a typical example of these, although has the distinction of often being depicted with flames coming from its mouth and ears! 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:PantherLynx is simply another name for the same creature (at least in Heraldry!)

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Lynch Name

Lynch Origin:

Ireland, England

Origins of Lynch:

The surname of Lynch has a few possible origins from which it derived. The first possible origin of the surname of Lynch is that it was a topographical surname. This means that this surname was given to someone who lived on or near a man-made or natural structure. This structure would have been a notable landmark or area within a town or village, thus making it distinguishable to those who hailed from this area. In the case of the surname of Lynch, this surname was given to someone who lived on or near a slope or a hillside. This derives from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “hlinc” which can be translated to mean “hill.” The surname of Lynch may also be a locational surname. This means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In th case of the surname of Lynch, the places from which someone who bore this surname would have hailed include the village of Lynch in Somerset, and the village of Linch in County Sussex. The word derivation is the same as the topographical meaning, as both of these villages are located on hills. In the country of Ireland, the surname of Lynch derives from the Clan Lynch, who were an important Clan within County Galway. It is believed that the surname of Lynch derives from the Old Gaelic surname of “O’Loingsigh” which can be translated to mean “the descendant of the mariner.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Linch, Lyinch, Llynch, Lynche, Leynch, Lyanch, Lynich, Lyonch, Lyncha, Lynnch

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Lynch can be found within the country of England. One person, who was recorded as being named as Geoffrey Linch, was recorded in the document known as the Fine Court Records of Suffolk. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry III of England, who was known throughout the ages, and commonly referred to as one “The Frenchman.” King Henry III ruled from the year 1216 to the year 1272. Those who bear the surname of Lynch can be found in high concentrations in the county of Lancashire. The areas in and around the city of London can also be credited with having a large population of people who are known by the surname of Lynch.

Ireland:

Within the country of Ireland, the first recorded spelling of the surname of Lynch was found within the “O’ Loingsigh” clan and the “de Lench” families. It is believed that those who bore the surname of Lynch from Ireland were among the first to arrive in the United States of America in the European Migration.

Scotland:

Those who are known by the surname of Lynch can be found within the country of Scotland. The area that has the highest concentration of people who bear the surname of Lynch can be found within the county of Lanarkshire.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Lynch: United States 135, 184; England 23,656; Ireland 20,800; Australia 14,461; Canada 8,690; South Africa 3,799; Argentina 3,464; Scotland 3,262; Jamaica 2,909; Northern Ireland 2,814

Notable People:

Margaret “Peg” Frances Lynch (1916-2015) who was a writer and actress from America who was also the creator of the sitcom that appeared on both radio and television, Ethel and Albert, she is credited with writing over 11,000 scripts for radio and television

Stanley “Stan” Joseph Lynch who was born in the year 1955 who is an American musician, songwriter, and producer who is best known as the original drummer for Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers

Stephen F. Lynch who was born in 1955 who is a politician from America who is a Massachusetts representative for the United States House of Representatives since the year 2001

Richard Hugh Lynch (1940-2012) who is an actor from America who is best known for his work as a villain in various movies and television shows

Thomas Lynch Jr. (1749-1779) who was as a representative from South Carolina was on of the youngest men to sign the America Declaration of Independence

Jane Lynch who was born in the year 1960 is a singer, actress, and comedian who has been awarded a golden globe

Lynch Family Gift Ideas

Browse Lynch family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Galway, Ireland; a family of great antiquity in Connaught, one of “The Tribes of Galway.” William le Petit is stated, in an old MS. in Ulster’s Office, to have been the progenitor of all the Lynches in Ireland). Az. a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped or. Crest—A lynx pass. az. collared or.
2) (Lynche-Blosse) (Castle Carra, co. Mayo, bart.; descended from Nicholas Lynch, Mayor of Galway, temp. James I., who had twelve sons. Henry Lynch, the eldest, was created a bart. 1622. Sir Robert Lynch, sixth bart., assumed the additional surname of Blosse). Motto—Nec temere nec timide. (Partry House, co. Mayo). Motto—Semper constana et fidelis. (Clough Ballymore Castle, co. Galway). (Ballinafad, co. Galway). (Peterborough, Lancaster, Barna, Loberry, and Lavally, all co. Galway). Same Arms. Crest—A lynx pass. cowarded ar.
3) (Clydagh House and Duras Park; confirmed to George Staunton Lynch, Esq., of Clydagh House, co. Galway, eldest son of Mark Lynch, Esq., of Duras Park, same co., and their descendants). Motto—Semper fidelis. Az. on a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped or, a mullet gu. Crest—A lynx pass. ppr. charged on the shoulder with a mullet gu.
4) (Clogher House, co. Mayo). Motto—Cor mundum erea in me Deus. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped or, for Lynch; 2nd and 3rd, a wolf saliant betw. three hearts, for Crean. Crests—1st: A lynx pass. guard. ppr., for Lynch; 2nd: A demi wolf, holding betw. the paws a heart, for Crean.
5) (Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1613, Christopher Lynch, Esq., of Croboy, Recorder of Drogheda). Ar. a cross sa. betw. four lions ramp. gu. armed and langued az.
6) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1615, Richard Lynch, Somonister in the Exchequer, Ireland). Az. on a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped or, a lozenge gu.
7) (Groves, co. Kent, and Rixton Hall, co. Lancaster). Sa. three leopards ramp. ar. spotted of the field.
8) (Teddington, co. Middlesex). Az. a chev. betw. three trefoils slipped or, on a chief ar. as many roses gu. seeded and barbed vert. Crest—A lynx pass. guard. ppr.
9) (Southampton). Az. a chev. betw. three quatrefoils or. Crest—A fox saliant ppr.
10) Sa. three lynxes pass. guard. ar. Crest—On a, ducal coronet or, a lynx, as in the arms.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
8. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, (various)
10. The Pursuivant of Arms, J. R. Planche, Hardwicke, London 1859
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P45
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Panther