Mallard Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mallard Family Coat of Arms

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Mallard Coat of Arms Meaning

Mallard Name Origin & History

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Mallard Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Mallard blazon are the crescent, ram, stag and chapeau. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, argent and sable .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Both the Ram and the ram’s head appear in heraldry, depicted in a lifelike aspect. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:ram Wade assigns it the meaning of “leader” on account of its role within the flock. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68 Wade quotes Nichols in suggesting that it most resembles the primrose, which “brings good luck to the finder”. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P135

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. 16A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits! 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mallard Name

Mallard Origin:

England, France, Germany

Origins of Mallard:

According to early recordings, this unique surname has many potential origins. These contain professions, like a manufacturer of mallets derived from the French discussion ‘maillet’, or a professional name for somebody who hunts of savage duck, or a name for who recognized in such a way to duplicate a mallard. And so probably one who is to be clothed in shiny colors or was continuously in the action, or as the last name from an ancient German particular surname of the 7th century Magihard, which mean solid power. It was a famous name among the ancient settlers of Normandy, whose cultures were just the same as the Vikings, aside from that they marched across Europe, whereas the Vikings traveled through the water. It is estimated that slightly 15% of all European names derived from these last names, and until 700 years before without knowing where the surname originated, it is hard to give an actual description. It can say that this surname is an obviously respectful name that a few had not, on the other hand, had not remained as such.

Variations:

More common variations are: Maillard, Malliard, Mallardy, Mallardo, Mallardi, Mayllard, Mallaird, Mallarad, Mallared, Miallard.

England:

The origins of the surname Mallard were in Derbyshire where people there held a family seat from early times and their first recordings arose on the ancient head count rolls taken by the ancient Lords of Britain to decide the rate of taxation of their citizens.

According to early recordings, which was chosen from various records and constitutions as the student records at the institutions of Cambridge and Oxford. The remaining records of French Church and jurisdiction Church of London included John Malard, of Herefordshire, in the Oxford record of the year 1580. Jacques Maillard at Notre Dame de L’Esvieres, Angers, in Maine-et-Loire, on 1st October in the year 1611, and Marye Mallard married with Ralph Beech at St James Church, Clerkenwell, on 15th, July in the year 1638.

United States:

People of Mallard also settled in the United States beginning in the 17 century. Individuals who settled in the 17th Century included Thomas Mallard, who arrived in Jamestown, Va in 1607. Tho Mallard, Fra Mallard, William Mallard and Henry Mallard, who landed in Virginia respectively in the years 1645, 1654, 1663 and 1664.

The following century saw much more Prendergast surnames arrive. People of Mallard, who came in the 18th century included Eliza Mallard, who came to Virginia in the year 1702.

People of Mallard who arrived in the 19th century included many people like H Mallard, who arrived in San Francisco, California in the year 1851 and Richard Mallard, who landed in Allegany County, Pennsylvania in 1872.

Canada:

People of the Mallard surname who settled in Canada in the 18th Century included Mr. Thomas Mallard who was born in England in the year 1753. People who came in the 19th century included Eliza Mallard, aged 25, arrived in Saint John, New Brunswick in the year 1833 boarded the ship “Dorcas Savage” from Belfast, Ireland.

Australia:

Some of the Mallard people who settled finally in Australia in the 19th century included Charles Mallard, an English prisoner from Northampton, who was landed aboard the ship “Adelaide” on 16 April 1855, settled in Western Australia.

New-Zealand:

The settlement of Mallard family also observed in the 19th century in places in New-Zealand. Bridget Mallard, aged 22, landed in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Steinwarder” in the year 1864.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mallard: United States 6,464; England 764; Australia 444; Canada 551; South Africa 968; France 2,976; Mexico 314; Brazil 159; New Zealand 140; Scotland 53.

Notable People:

Andrew Mallard (1962) was a prisoner in Perth, Australia, incorrectly convicted of murder. He was released in 2002.

Chante Jawan Mallard (1976) was an African American woman from Texas who was sentenced for 50 years for the murder of a homeless man.

Ernest-François Mallard (1833 – 1894) was a French mineralogist.

Henri Mallard (1884 – 1967) was an Australian photographer who supported the development of the Sydney Harbour overpass

John Mallard was a teacher of Medical Physics at the University of Aberdeen

Shayne Mallard (1964) was a politician in the inner Sydney area.

Trevor Mallard (1954) was a New Zealand politician.

Mallard Family Gift Ideas

Browse Mallard family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Vert on a bend ar. three crescents sa. Crest—On a chapeau gu. a stag trippant ppr.
2) Vert a chev. betw. three rams statant ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:ram
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P68
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P135
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
16. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30