Manger Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Manger Family Coat of Arms

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Manger Coat of Arms Meaning

Manger Name Origin & History

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Manger Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Manger blazon are the rose, anchor and greyhound. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and gules.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

A wide variety of inanimate objects 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281 appear in coats of arms, so of them still recognisable today, others now rather obscure. The images used are often simplified and stylised, the anchor is a typical case. For any meaning, we need look no further than a nautical or sea-faring heritage. Indeed, some arms go into great detail of the colours and arrangement of the stock, stem, cables and flutes of the anchor reflecting a detailed knowledge of the form and use of this device. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:anchor.

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Manger Name

Manger Origin:

England

Origins of Manger:

Listed as Manger and Monger, this is an old English surname. It is professional either for a person who worked in a stable or as a merchant or retailer. The later styling was as a costermonger, a term which usually represented a retailer of fruit and vegetables. The origin is from the pre 7th-century-word ‘mangere.’ Professional surnames were created in old times in about the 12th-century AD but they did not frequently become inherited unless a son followed his father into the same line of business. Many did not, and the first name then died out, probably to be restored by a later generation. In this situation, though the surname has a very early first documentation with that of William Manger, who was clearly a person of some importance. He was noted as a land holder in the Hundred Rolls of the division of Huntingdon in the year 1255. Next documentations from the old era contain those of Richard le Manger in the Premium Tax records of the division of Worcester in 1275, and in Yorkshire, that of Robert Monger. He not in ed the Friary Rolls of the manor of Wakefield in 1316, during the rule of King Edward 11nd 1307 – 1327.

Variations:

More common variations are: Mangera, Mangere, Mangeri, Mangero, Maniger, Maneger, Mangery, Mangeur, Mangeer, Mangeru.

England:

The surname Manger first appeared in Wiltshire where the name acquired from the ” Anglo-Saxon mancgere, originally a dealer of the highest class. Aelfric’s mancgere served as trading gems, gold, wine, oil, etc.” The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Manger had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Manger landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Manger who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Elizabeth Manger, who landed in Virginia in 1651.

People with the surname Manger who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Johannes Manger, who arrived in America in 1709. Eliza Manger, who came to Virginia in 1715. Joh Phil Manger, who landed in America in 1764-1798. Johann Phil Manger, who arrived in America in 1789.

The following century saw much more Manger surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Manger who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Christiana Fred Manger, who arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1802. Daniel Manger, who landed in New York, NY in 1831. Charles Manger, who landed in New York, NY in 1831. Anne Manger arrived in New York, NY in 1848. Jacob Manger, who arrived in Somerset County, Pennsylvania in the year1851.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Manger who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Anne Manger at the age of 19, a servant, arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship “General Hewett.” Johanna Manger at the age of 21, also a servant, arrived in South Australia in the same year 1858 aboard the ship “General Hewett.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Manger who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Philip Manger at the age of 20, arrived in Lyttelton, New Zealand aboard the ship “Ballochmyle” in 1874.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Manger: India 20,777; Germany 2,118; United States 1,679; Egypt 817; England 430; Ukraine 302; Australia 182; Brazil 159; Netherlands 146; Russia 135

Notable People:

Albert Henry Manger (May 1899–March 1985) was an American weightlifter who competed in the 1932 Summer Olympics. He died in Baltimore, Maryland.

Itzik Manger (May 1901, Czernowitz, then Austrian-Hungarian Empire – 21 February 1969, Gedera, Israel) was a famous Yiddish poet and playwright, a self-proclaimed folk bard, visionary, and ‘master tailor’ of the written word.

Manger Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Jersey and Guernsey). Gu. an anchor erect in pale or, on a chief of the second three roses of the first. Crest—A greyhound’s head erased gu. collared and ringed or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:anchor
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69