Mansell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mansell Family Coat of Arms

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Mansell Coat of Arms Meaning

Mansell Name Origin & History

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Mansell Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Mansell blazon are the maunch, label and fess. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, sable and gules .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

When people are depicted in heraldry their clothing and appearance are often described in some detail 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. We also find individual items of clothing used as charges in a coat of arms, and maunch is a good example of this, representing a loose sleeve. Sometimes these items are drawn in a somewhat stylised fashion, not always obvious as to what it represents. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Maunch Wade suggests that its use came from a role in the tournament in which a part of clothing or some other trinked was given as a token to knights in combat by their supporters. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P50

The label holds a special place in heraldry, originlly being a temporary mark, used by the oldest son while his father was still alive. In appearance it is a horizontal bar near the top of the shield from which descend 3 or 5 “points” or small rectangles descending from the bar. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label In more recent use it has come to used as charge in its own right 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154 and may have additional charges on each point, which can create a pleasing visual effect.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mansell Name

Mansell Origin:

England, France

Origin of Mansell:

This popular surname has three possible sources; two origins are French and one is English. The first and most likely origin of the name being a French geographical name from the Olde French word “Mansel” given to a resident of Maine (North West France) or its essential part Le Mans. In France, “mansel” was also a position name for an old resident who employed a Manse (a part of land enough to support a family). The third possible origin of the name is that it acquires from the Olde English, particular name “mann,” in the Latin language as Manzellinus. One, Mansell de Patleshull listed in the 1203 Assize Court Rolls of Staffordshire. A Robert Le Mansel shows in 1171, Pipe Rolls of Hampshire, and a Philip de Mansel.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Maunsell, Mannsell, Manswell, Manselle, Mansella, Manselli, Manseill, Manscell, Mansiell, Manusell.

Scotland:

The surname Mansell first organized in Glamorganshire, an area of South Wales, an old part of the Welsh kingdom of Glywysing, where they held a family seat from very old times and given lands by Duke William of Normandy, their true King, for their extraordinary service at the battle of Hastings in 1066 A.D.

England:

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Turstinus Mansel, which was dated 1148, in The Winton Rolls of Hampshire. It was during the time of King Stephen, which was known as “Count of Blois,” dated 1135 – 1154.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Mansell settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Mansell who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included John Mansell, who landed in Maryland in 1637. Ann Mansell, who came in Maryland in 1649. John Mansell settled in Virginia in 1650. John Mansell settled in Virginia in 1653. Margaret Mansell who settled in Maryland in 1659.

Some of the people with the name Mansell who settled in the United States in the 18th century included William Mansell settled in Maryland in 1731. William Mansell landed in Maryland in 1731.

Some of the people with the name Mansell who settled in the United States in the 19th century included E Mansell, who came in San Francisco, California in 1851. Henry Mansell at the age of 22 and Sarah Mansell at the age of 22, both arrived in New York in the same year in 1862.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Mansell who settled in Canada in the 19th century included Thomas Mansell, who settled in Nova Scotia in 1811.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Mansell who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Joseph Mansell at the age of 30, a laborer, arrived in South Australia in 1851 aboard the ship “Prince Regent.” Joseph Mansell at the age of 30, and Caroline Mansell at the age of 36, both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Prince Regent” in the same year in 1851. William Mansell at the age of 28, who was a worker, arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “Anglia.” Bridget Mansell at the age of 19, moved to South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Rodney.

New Zealand:

Some of the people with the name Mansell who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included William Mansell at the age of 24, who was a gardener, and Matilda Mansell at the age of 25, both arrived in Nelson aboard the ship “Clifford” in the same year in 1842. William Mansell at the age of 21 and Eliza Mansell at the age of 20, both settled in Nelson aboard the ship “Sir Charles Forbes” in the same year in 1842. Henry Mansell settled in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Black Eagle” in 1861.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mansell: United States 4,253; England 5,496; Wales 564; Australia 1,740; Scotland 158; Canada 956; South Africa 621; Germany 168; Brazil 127; New Zealand 648.

Notable People:

Clint Mansell (1963–), is a British singer and writer.

Chris Mansell (1953–), is an Australian poet.

Jessica Mansell (1989–), is an Australian baller.

Lee Mansell (1982–), is a British football player.

Greg Mansell (1987–), is a racecar driver.

Percy Mansell (1965–1995), was a South African cricket player.

Richard Mansell (1813–1904), was a British railway administrator.

Mansell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Mansell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Gloucester). Gules a fesse argent a label of the second.
2) (Guildford, co. Surrey; granted by Walker, Garter). Or, three maunches sable on a chief gules a lion pass, guard, or.
3) Sable a chevron between three maunches argent. Crest—On a chapeau gules turned up ermine a flame of fire proper.
4) Or, on a fesse dancettee gu three lions rampant or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Maunch
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P50
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse