Mansbridge Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mansbridge Family Coat of Arms

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Mansbridge Coat of Arms Meaning

Mansbridge Name Origin & History

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Mansbridge Coat of Arms Meaning

The main device (symbol) in the Mansbridge blazon is the eagle. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, argent and or .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mansbridge Name

Mansbridge Origin:

England

Origins of Mansbridge:

This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a locational name from some estate, unlisted, or now a “lost” place called Mansbridge, considered to have been located in London because of the high percentage of early surname records from that division. The component elements of the place name are the Olde English pre 7th Century male given name “Mann,” similar to the Old High German “man,” used to show a bold or strong man, with the Olde English “brycg,” Middle English “brigge,” which means bridge. So, “Man(n)’s Bridge.” This first component also appeared in Manston, places in Dorset and Kent, noted respectively as “Manestone” and “Mannestone” in the Domesday Book of 1086. Geographical surnames were originally given to local land holders, and the lord of the estate, and particularly as a means of identification to those who departed from their mother town to settle any other place. In September 1561, William, son of John Mansbridg, named at St. Mary Abchurch, London, in October 1577, and John Mansbridge and Thomasin Winter married at St. Dunstan’s, Stepney, London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Manisbridge, Mainsbridge Monsbridge, Mensbridge.

England:

The surname Mansbridge first appeared in London where they held a family seat as Lords of the Estate. The Saxon rule of English history declined after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman atmosphere controlled. But Saxon surnames remained, and the family name first mentioned in the 13th century when they held estates in that city.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Mansbrige, dated about 1559, marriage to Ellin Wallis, in the “St.Margaret Moses,” London. It was during the time of Queen Elizabeth I who was known to be the “Good Queen Bess,” dated 1558 – 1603. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Mansbridge had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Mansbridge who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Ursula Mansbridge, who came to Maryland in 1657.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Mansbridge who came to Canada in the 19th century included Henry Mansbridge and William Mansbridge, who are on record in the census of Ontario, Canada of 1871.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Mansbridge who landed in Australia in the 19th century included James Mansbridge arrived in South Australia in 1850 aboard the ship “Trafalgar.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mansbridge: England 1,097; Australia 297; Canada 249; United States 146; Wales 79; New Zealand 62; United Arab Emirates 6; Scotland 59; Belgium 2; France 2.

Notable People:

Peter Mansbridge (born 1948), was a Canadian writer and anchor of The National.

Ronald Mansbridge (1905–2006), was a journalist and writer.

Mansbridge Family Gift Ideas

Browse Mansbridge family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (London; John Mansbridge, citizen and draper. Visit. London, 1568). Quarterly, ar. and vert four eagles displ. counterchanged.
2) (London). Quarterly, ar. and or, four eagles displ. with two heads vert. Crest—A dexter arm erect, habited az. culled ar. holding in the hand ppr. a demi eagle displ. with two heads gu. ducally gorged or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74