Marbury Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Marbury Family Coat of Arms

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Marbury Coat of Arms Meaning

Marbury Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Merbury.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Marbury. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Marbury Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Marbury blazon are the cross engrailed, pheon, garb and fesse engrailed. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 9Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67. The pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

Given the martial nature of the origins of Heraldry, in the identification of knights and men-at-arms it can come as no surprise that mediaeval weaponry of all types are frequently to be found in a coat of arms 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89. The pheon is a specific type of arrow head with barbs and darts and hence quite distinctive in appearance. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon Like the other symbols related to arrows, Wade suggests the symbolism is that of “readiness for military service”. 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111

Europe in the middle ages was still a largely agrarian society, and the wealth of the nobility resided in their estates and land. Since most people still lived and worked on the land they would find farm implements instantly recognisable, (an important feature for a coat of arms), even if they seem obscure to us today. 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86 The garb for example is an ancient word for wheatsheaf, something now more frequently seen in Inn signs than in the field! 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Marbury Name

Origins of Marbury:
Marbury is one of the thousands of new names that the Norman Invasion brought to England in 1066.  The Marbury family resided in Cheshire, at the estate of Marbury, from whence they took their name.  It is only in the last few hundred years that the English language has regulated.  For that reason, Anglo-Norman surnames like Marbury are characterized by many spelling variations.  Authors and priests in the Middle Ages spelled names they sounded, so it is common to find many variations that relate to a single person.  As the English language changed and incorporated components of other European languages like Norman French and Latin, even educate people regularly changed the spelling of their names.  The variations of the name Marbury include Marbury, Marburie, Marberrie,Marberry, Merbury, Marburry, Marburrie, Marbery, Marberie and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Marbuary, Marbuery, Marburry, Marybury, Marburey, Marbry, Marbur, Morbury, Marbour, Merbury.

England:
The surname Marbury first appeared in Cheshire where they held a family seat from old times, as Lords of the estate of Marbury.  At the time of the taking of the Domesday Book in the year 1086, these lands and Hamlet held by William Malbank, who held them from Lord Harold.

United States of America:
Some of the people with the surname Marbury who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Ann Marbury, who arrived in Boston, Massachusetts in the year 1634.  Richard Marbury settled in Virginia in the year 1643.

Marbury Family Gift Ideas

Browse Marbury family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Marbury, co. Chester, temp. Edward II.). Sa. a cross engr. ar. betw. four pheons (sometimes crosses tau) of the second. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up ar. and semée of plates, a Saracen’s head in profile couped ppr. crined and bearded sa. wreathed about the temples gu.
2) (Walton, co. Chester, temp. Edward III.). Ar. on a fesse engr. az. three garbs or. Crest—A mermaid ppr. holding in the dexter hand a mirror, and in the sinister a comb or.
3) (Walton, co. Chester, temp. Edward III.). Ar. on a fesse engr. az. three garbs or. Crest—A mermaid ppr. holding in the dexter hand a mirror, and in the sinister a comb or.
4) (co. Northumberland). Sa. a cross betw. four nails ar.
5) (Gresby, co. Lincoln). Ar. on a fesse engr. gu. three garbs or.
6) Gu. two bars or, on a chief of the second a lion pass. of the first.
7) (Marbury). Or, on a fess engr. az. three garbs of the first.
8) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1619, Anne Marbury, wife of Sir Richard Hansard, Knt.). Sa. a cross engr. betw. four spear heads erect ar.
9) Sa. a fesse engr. betw. three nails ar.
10) (London; Thomas Marbury, citizen and haberdasher of London. Visit. London, 1568). (Lambeth, co. Surrey; confirmed by Segar, Garter, 10 May, 1616). Sa. a cross engr. betw. four pheons ar. Crest—A seahorse assurgent per pale or and az. crined gu.
11) (co. Chester). Or, on a fesse engr. az. three garbs of the first. Crest—A camel's head sa. ducally gorged or.
12) (Reg. Ulster's Office). Ar. a cross engr. betw. four spearheads sa.
13) (Walton, co. Chester). Same Arms. Crest—A mermaid ppr. holding in the dexter hand a mirror, and in the sinister a comb.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
9. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 89
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pheon
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P111
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 86
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Garbe