Mariott Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mariott Family Coat of Arms

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Mariott Coat of Arms Meaning

Mariott Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Mariot.

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Mariott Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Mariott blazon are the barry and bend. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, sable and ermine .

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

When the field of the shield is filled with alternately coloured horizontal lines, this is known as barry, obviously because it is like having many separate bars across the field 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry. Such shields have great clarity from a distance, those awarded by Henry III of England to Richard de Grey were, for example, Barry argent and azure, simple blue and white horizontal stripes. According to Wade, there was no specific meaning to be attached to barry itself, but it affords the opportunity to display at equal importance two colours that may themselves have specific meanings 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P55.

The bend is a distinctive part of the shield, frequently occuring and clearly visible from a distance – it is a broad band running from top left to bottom right 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40. Indeed, so important is the bend that it was the subject of one of the earliest cases before the English Court of Chivalry; the famous case of 1390, Scrope vs Grosvenor had to decide which family were the rightful owners of Azure, a bend or (A blue shield, with yellow bend). 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22. The bend is held in high honour and may signify “defence or protection” and often borne by those of high military rank 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mariott Name

Origins of Mariott:
The Norman Invasion of England in 1066 brought much change to the island nation, including many foreigners with new names. Among these immigrants were the founders of the Mariott family, who resided in Leicestershire.  Their name, however, is a source of the family’s place of residence before the Norman Invasion of England in 1066, Marriot in Normandy.  While many of the family settled in England, some stayed behind in Normandy as shown by Richard Mareta who noted there (1180-1195). Some spelling variations describe Norman surnames.  Many variations occurred because Old and Middle English required any definite spelling rules. The introduction of Norman French to England also had a pronounced effect, as did the court languages of Latin and French. Therefore, one person was often referred to by several different spellings in a single lifetime.  The different spellings include Marriott, Mariott, Marriot, Marritt, Marrot, Marrotte, Mariatt, Maryet, Maryott, Marryatt, Mariate, Merritt, Merriott and much more.

Variations:
More common variations are: Marriott, Mariotti, Mariotto, Mariotte, Mariotta, Mariott, Mariiott, Marueitt, Meariott, Marott, Mariot.

England:
The surname Mariott first appeared in Somerset at Merriott, a church, in the union of Chard, hundred of Crewkerne.  This church noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Meriet and possibly meant “boundary gate,” from the Old English words “maere” and “geat.” Some of the first listings of the name contain as Alric filius Meriet, and Aelric Meriete in 1066 and Aegel filius Mergeati near the year 1086. Symon Meriet recorded in the Assize Rolls of 1202.  The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273 listed as John de Meriet in Lincolnshire and Simon de Meriet in Somerset.

Australia:
Some of the individuals with the surname Mariott who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Oliver Mariott at the age of 27, who was a labourer, arrived in South Australia in 1852 aboard the ship “China”.

Mariott Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Barry of eight ar. and sa. a bend erm.
2) (cos. Warwick and Gloucester). Barry of six or and sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P55
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 39-40
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P22
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P49