Markey Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Markey Family Coat of Arms

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Markey Coat of Arms Meaning

Markey Name Origin & History

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Markey Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Markey blazon are the mullet and fess. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, or and argent .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Markey Name

Markey Origin

Scotland

Origin of Markey:

There are over one hundred spelling structures of Markey that are listed from English and Scottish Mark, Marke, Markie, Markey, Marks and Markes. In French Marc and Marcq, the Italian Marco and Spanish Marcos, the Dutch Murkus, Czech Marek, and Russian Markowitz and Markovski. The old surname is of Roman sources. It evolves from the famous pre-Christian ritual name “Marcus”, from Mar, which means flash, whereas there is also a potential combination with “Mars,” the God of War or battle. The fame of the name is closely related with St Mark “The Televangelist” and composer of the Second Gospel, though the surname itself is over one thousand years old. The name, as St Mark or St Marc, or Sanctus Marcus, was implemented in old times to a holy spiritual place, monastery’s, and other places of religion. The names of these areas were especially famous in Italy and Spain, and the South of France. The developing Locational surnames were frequently provided even to the real Kings of the village or any place and consequently were picked as inherited surnames, or more commonly the name was provided as a type of recognition to people who migrated from their real motherlands. It was then, and it frequently remains so today, that one of the simplest means of recognition to an unknown person is to call him or her by the name of the region or country from which they come. Other famous examples of the surname spellings, the real name being listed mostly in the European country, contain De Marco, Di Marko, Marcus, Marchi, Merck, Marck and Van der Marck, to Marconi, Marchitello, De Marchi, Marcovitch, Markushkin, and even Marczewski.

Variations:

Some common variations of this surname are: Marckey, Marokey, Marakeya, Markeye, Markiey, Markey, Marke, Marky, Markey.

Scotland:

The surname originated in Ayrshire, an early division in the southwestern Strathclyde area of Scotland, that today makes up the Council Areas of South, East and North Ayrshire, where they controlled a family seat from early times and their early lists developed on the pre-census rolls taken by the ancient Lord of Scotland.

The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling varieties of the original one.

Germany:

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Heinrich Mark, in the documents of the town of Biberach, Germany, in the year 1390 dated 1175.

Ireland:

People of Markey moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States:

People of Markey settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in 17th 18th and 19th. Some of the people of Markey family who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Darcy Markey, who arrived and Davey Markey, who landed in Virginia in the same year in 1657.

Some of the people of Markey family who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Marcus Markey at the age of 45, arrived in Pennsylvania in the year 1736 during the 18th Century.

Some of the people of Markey family who settled in the United States in the 19th century included James Markey, who arrived in New York, NY in 1816 and John Markey, who landed in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in 1844 during the 19th Century.

Australia:

Some of the Markey people who settled ultimately in Australia in the 19th century included Theophilius Markey at the age of 29, a laborer and Patrick Markey, aged 35 and also a laborer these two people arrived in South Australia in the same year in 1850 aboard the ship “Trafalgar.” James Markey, aged 46, was a manufacturer arrived in South Australia 1854 aboard the ship “Sir Thomas Gresham”.

New Zealand:

Some of the Markey people who settled ultimately in New Zealand in the 19th century included Alice Markey at the age of 21 who was a servant arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Arethusa” in 1879.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Markey: United States 6,808; England 1,371; Ireland 1.059; Australia 904; Belgium 438; France 429; South Africa 329; India 298; Canada 290; Northern Ireland 286.

Notable People:

Alexander Markey (1891-1958), was a Hungarian-born American film producer.

Betsy Markey (born 1956), is a Democratic politician representing Colorado’s 4th congressional district.

Brendan Markey (born 1976), is an Irish football player.

Dave Markey (born 1963), is an American film producer.

Markey Family Gift Ideas

Browse Markey family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Alton Court, co. Hereford; John Markey, Esq., son of William Markey, of Alton Court, gent., by Sibel, dau. of Robert Kyrle, Esq., m. in 1635, Benedicta, sister of Sir Bennett Hoskyns, Bart., of Harewood). Vert a fesse argent between three mallets or.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse