Marker Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Marker Family Coat of Arms

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Marker Coat of Arms Meaning

Marker Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Marker. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Marker Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Marker blazon are the pale and greyhound. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and argent.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The Pale is one of the major, so called ordinaries, significant objects that extend across the entire field of the shield. The pale being a broad vertical band up the centre of the shield 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale. In origin, the word probably has its roots in the same place as palisade, a defensive wall made of closely space upright timbers. Indeed, it is possible that the original “pales” arose where a wooden shield was constructed of vertical planks painted in different hues 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1. This is perhaps why Wade, a writer on Heraldic Symbology suggested that denotes “military strength and fortitude” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47.

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Marker Name

Marker Origin:

England, Italy, Spain, France, Czechoslovakia, Germany

Origins of Marker:

The surname of Marker is said to have two possible origins. The first possible origin of the surname of Marker is that it is a locational surname. Since the surname of Marker is said to be locational, this means that it was often taken by the Lord or owner of the land from which the name derives. Others who may have take a locational surname are people who have migrated out of the area to seek out work. The easiest way to identify someone who was a stranger at that time was by the name of their birthplace. In the case of the surname of Marker, the locations from which the original bearers of this surname were said to have hailed from include areas in the countries of Spain, Italy, and France. These locations were often named Marchus, Mark, or variations of these spellings. The second possible origin of the surname of Marker is that it was a derivation of the personal given name of Marcus, which itself was a derivation of the word of “mar” which can be translated to mean “gleaming.” The personal given name of Mark or Marcus was given as a nickname. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Marker, those who originally bore this surname would have been said to “gleam” in society, making them a prominent figure. However, because those in the Middle Ages were often sarcastic in their naming, the person who bore this surname could have been dull, uninteresting, and non-valuable. Finally, the surname of Marker gained popularity because of the religious connotations with the name. St. Mark, the Evangelist, was said to be the author of the second book of the gospel in the Bible.

Variations:

More common variations are: Markery, Maerker, Marcker, Mariker, Maraker, Maruker, Markero, Mearker, Markr, Marekera, Marekero, Merkere, Mieraker

History:

Germany:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Marker can be traced to the country of Germany. One person by the name of one Heinrich Mark was mentioned in the Town Charters of Biberach, Germany in the year of 1390. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Rupert of Germany, who was known throughout the age, and commonly referred to as one “Rupert of the Palatinate.” King Rupert of Germany ruled from the year of 1352 to the year of 1410.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, many European citizens migrated to the United States of America in search of a new life for them and their families. This movement of people was known as the European Migration, and sometimes referred to as the Great Migration of Europe. Among those who migrated to the United States was one Matthias Marker, who arrived in the city of Philadelphia in the year of 1734, the first Marker in the United States of America.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Marker: United States 6,822; Germany 2,387; Denmark 890; Pakistan 754; Russia 690; Argentina 388; England 317; Mexico 262; Australia 223; Poland 191; India 161; Austria 157; France 135; Norway 125; Canada 87

Notable People:

Gary “Magic” Marker (1943-2015) who was a bass guitarist and recording engineer from the United States of America.

Clifford Norwell Marker (1903-1972) who was a professional football player from the United States of America.

Steve Marker (born in 1959) who was a musician and record producer from the United States of America.

Peter Marker, who was an Australian rules footballer.

Augustus Solberg Marker (1907-1997) who was a professional ice hockey right winger from the United States of America.

Chris Marker (born in 1921) who was a documentary film director, photographer, writer, multi-media artist, and film essayist from the country of France.

Marker Family Gift Ideas

Browse Marker family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Uffculme, co. Devon). Per pale argent and gules a pale counterchanged. Crest—A greyhound statant per pale argent and sable.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pale
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, Chapter 1
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P47
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69