Marmaduke Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Marmaduke Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Marmaduke Coat of Arms Meaning

Marmaduke Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Marmaduke. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

marmaduke coat of arms

Marmaduke Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Marmaduke blazon are the parrot, fesse, ringdove and bezant. The three main tinctures (colors) are vaire, vert and gules .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

The parrot is a fairly recent usage, but the ancient form of popinjay was more common 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Parrot. Commonly coloured vert (green) with beak and legs gules (red) it is usually depicted with a high degree of realism. 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P249

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. In truth, despite the proliferation of species, the actual depictions can sometimes be hard to distinguish! The crane, heron and stork are commonly to be found on a coat of arms but all tend to share the same stylised appearance 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164. The ringdove is amongst the mjaor bird species to appear in heraldry.

Marmaduke Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Marmaduke Name

Origins of Marmaduke:
This surname acquired from the name of an ancestor. ‘the son of Marmaduke’; somewhat limited in the surname period. Nevertheless, it was famous in Yorkshire and made the pet nicks.  Doket and Doke (now Duckett and Duke) favourites long enough for them to become surnames and achieve inmlortality in our directories.

Variations:
More common variations are: Marmaduk, Marmadyuk, Marmeduke, Marmdduke, Marmodyuk.

England:
The surname Marmaduke first appeared in Lincolnshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Estate.  The Norman impact of English history controlled after the Battle of Hastings in 1066.  The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries and the Norman ambience controlled.  The family name was first mentioned in the 13th century when they held lands in that shire.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Marmaduke landed in the United States in the 17th century.   Some of the people with the name Marmaduke who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Richard Marmaduke, who landed in Virginia in the year 1638.  William Marmaduke, who landed in Virginia in the year 1662.  Edward Marmaduke who landed in Virginia in the year 1663.  Jacob Marmaduke, who arrived in Virginia in the same year 1663.  Robert Marmaduke, who arrived in Maryland in the year 1671.

Marmaduke Family Gift Ideas

Browse Marmaduke family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More marmaduke Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (from the seal of Richard Marmaduc, 1318). Ar. a fesse gu. betw. three parrots vert. Crest—Three mullets in chev. ar.
2) Gu. a fesse betw. three ringdoves ar. beaked, legged, and collared or.
3) Vairé ar. and gu. a bordure az. bezantée.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Parrot
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P249
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P164