Marple Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Marple Family Coat of Arms

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Marple Coat of Arms Meaning

Marple Name Origin & History

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Marple Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Marple blazon are the cross crosslet fitchee and griffin. The three main tinctures (colors) are argent, or and sable .

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross. The cross crosslet is one of these, having an additional cross bar on each arm. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet Wade suggests that these additional crossing signify “the fourfold mystery of the Cross”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103 The final addition fitchee simply means pointed, and indicates that the lower end is pointed, as if it is to be struck into the ground. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]15Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Marple Name

Marple Origin:

England

Origins of Marple:

Listed with the spellings of Maple, Mapples, Marple, Marples, and Maypole, this is an English surname. According to the popular Victorian etymologist Canon Charles Bardsley, the surname is from Yorkshire, and not in any way related to the small town of Marples in Cheshire. He explains that the surname shows one who lived ‘at the maples’ and as such relates to a forest or thicket of maple trees. The second research does show that while the majority of the surname ancestors perhaps derive from Yorkshire as Thomas de Mapple listed in the city of York, and Johannes and Willelmus de name in the town of Rotherham, all in the infamous census Tax rolls for the year 1379. However, we differ from Canon Bardsley in having an approach to better documentations, and in our opinion, the spelling as Marple or Marples may for some name ancestors at least, have acquired from the town name. It was the rule from the oldest times of the formation of genetics surnames in the 14th century for people who had departed from their original mother towns, to be named after that hamlet or town. Marple (town) first listed in 1248 in the spelling of Merpel. It shows a meaning of the place on the slope overlooking the (River) Mersey. Examples of next recordings contain as Robtus Maple at St Andrews parish, Enfield, Middlesex, in August 1564, and Johannis Marples at St Martins in the Field, Westminster, in March 1673.

Variations:

More common variations are: Marpole, Marpley, Marpale, Marpl, Marapale, Marapile, Marepale, Marapule, Marepele, Mareplle.

England:

The surname Marple first appeared in Cheshire where they held a family seat as Kings of the Castle of Marple, or in more old times pronounced as Merpul. The first list of ownership of the lands was when Randle, Earl of Chester gave the manorial rights to Robert of Stockport. He sold the land to Sir George Vernon, known as ‘The King of the Peak’ senior of one those complicated east Cheshire families who had rule over the forests of Cheshire and Derbyshire. Marple Hall survives, and in the 19th century was the seat of the remarkable Isherwood family, having a seat of the Bradshaws. Interestingly, one of the theories of the source of Agatha Christie’s fictional character Miss Marple was that it derived the name from a family called Marple, who resided at Marple Hall near her sister Madge’s home at Abney Hall. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Marple had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the population with the surname Marple who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Daniel and Cath Marple and three children settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1820.

Canada:

Some of the people with the surname Marple who landed in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. David Marple U.E. born in Virginia, America who shifted in St. Stephen, Charlotte Division, New Brunswick near the year 1784, he was part of the 74th Control. Mr. Northrop Marple U.E.and Mr. Samuel R. Marple U.E., both born in Virginia, America and settled in St. Stephen, Charlotte Division, New Brunswick near the year 1784, they were part of the 74th Control.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Marple: United States 3,106; Canada 226; England 145; France 73; Australia 63; New Zealand 33; Scotland 20; Italy 3; Denmark 2; Netherlands 1.

Notable People:

Carole Marple (born 1941), is an Australian political leader.

Stan Marple was a Canadian ice hockey player and referee.

Miss Marple was a fictional character created by Agatha Christie.

Marple Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bonsal, co. Derby). Sa. semée of crosses crosslet fitchée ar. a griffin segreant or.
2) (Edenstourc, co. Derby; confirmed 20 Sept. 1574). Sa. semée of crosses crosslet fitchée a griffin segreant wings endorsed or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross Crosslet
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P103
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fitché
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
15. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150