Marrow Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Marrow Family Coat of Arms

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Marrow Coat of Arms Meaning

Marrow Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Marrow. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Marrow Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Marrow blazon are the billettee, pillar, maiden’s head and pellet. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The billet is a simple rectangular shape like a brick or ingot, and in fact is sometimes shown with simply shading to imply rounded corners, quite a rare feature in the largely solid and geometric art of heraldry. Billetty then comes to mean “strewn with billets”, i.e. the field is covered with regularly spaced rectangles with large gaps between them 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Billet. This kind of patterning is known as a treatment, and there are no fixed colours, any combination may be used.

The Pillar, according to Wade symbolises “fortitude and constancy”. 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P101 Typically the pillar is a plain column with simple cushion capitals but architecture fans will be pleased to know that other orders (doric, ionic etc.) can be specified! 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pillars

Heraldry is a human art, by and for people and it is not surprising that people themselves are frequently depicted in arms 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174. Often these are images of knights and men-at-arms, or individual limbs, such as the “three armoured right arms argent” shown in the arms of Armstrong 13Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 60. As well as the nobility however, we also see both the mundane, ploughmen, fishermen and reapers; and the exotic in the form of club wielding savages and the Moorish or Saracen gentleman with his decorative wreathed turban 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168. The maidens head is a typical example of this use of the human figure.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Marrow Name

Marrow Origin:

England

Origins of Marrow:

This interesting and unusual name is of early old English origin and is one of that large set of European surnames that developed from the continual use of nicknames. These were used for different characteristics, like physical appearances or particularities, mental and moralistic qualities, styles of dressing, or profession. In this situation, the surname Marrow acquires from the Middle English word “marwe,” which means fellow, friend, companion worker. The term was frequently considered to be an from Old Scandinavian source, where it is used to represent a fellow, especially a job mate. Previous documentations of the name consist of Geoffrey le Marewe, in the Cambridgeshire Hundred Rolls of 1276. William Marrow, at the age of 25 yrs., was an early traveler to the New World. He shifted from London aboard the “Hopewell” in February 1634, obligated for the Barbadoes.

Variations:

More common variations are: Maorrow, Marow, Mrrow, Morrow, Murrow, Merrow, Mirrow, Mearow, Marrow, Maurow.

England:

The origins of the surname Marrow found in Somerset at Merriott, a church, in the union of Chard, hundreds of Crewkerne. This church recorded in the book of Domesday of the year as Meriet and may be meant as “Border gate” from the ancient English words”maere” and “geat.” Some of the first recordings of the name consist of Alric filius Meriet and Aelric Meriet in 1066 and Aegel filius Mergeati near the year 1086. Symon Meriet recorded in the Assize Rolls of 1202. The Hundredorum Rolls of 1273, John de Meriet in Lincoln shire and Simon de Meriet in Somerset.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John Marwe, dated 1280, in the “Records of the Freeman of Leicester.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199-1216.

Ireland:

Many of the people with name Marrow had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Marrow settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Marrow who settled in the United States in the 17th century included William Marrow at the age of 25 landed in Barbados in the year 1634. Geo Marrow arrived in Virginia in 1647. James Marrow, Mary Marrow and Dorithy Marrow, all arrived in Virginia in the same year in 1657.

The following century saw much more Marrow surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Marrow who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Robert Marrow and Michael Marrow at the age of 21, both landed in New York, NY respectively in the years 1816 and 1848.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Marrow who settled in Australia in the 19th century included J.J. Marrow arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Constant” in the year 1849.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Marrow: United States 3,673; England 704; Australia 85; Ireland 22; Canada 52; South Africa 274; New-Zealand 24; Iceland 6; Tanzania 158; Jamaica 71.

Notable People:

Alexander James Marrow was born in the year 1890 and was an English Professional football player.

F. Maclin Marrow Jr., was an American leader, U.S representative in Gibraltar from the year 1921 to 1922.

Vincent Charles Marrow was born in the year 1968. He was an American football referee and old NFL tight end.

Charles Kennon Marrow was an American Major League Baseball pitcher who played from the year 1932 to the year 1938.

Mitch Marrow was born in the year 1975. He was an old American NFL football player.

Alfred Josephon “Jay” Marrow was born in the year 1905 and died in the year 1978. He was an American expert in Psychology, and rewarded the Kurt Lewin Memorial Award in the year 1964.

Marrow Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Or, billettee sa. a fesse of the last. Crest— A pillar ar. base az.
2) (confirmed by Carney, Ulster, 1656, to William Marrow, of the Ordnance, who came to Ireland with Oliver Cromwell, 1649). Az. on a less engr. or, betw. three maidens' heads ppr. a mullet sa. betw two pellets. Crest— A maiden's head ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Billet
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P101
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Pillars
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P174
13. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 60
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P168