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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Hargood Hill, co. York). Barry of six ar. and sa. a lion ramp. gu.
2) (West Riddleaden, Hailing Hall, Woodhouse, Staynland, Alverthorpe, &c., &c., formerly Montalt, co. York. Visit. 1585). (Kendal, co. Westmoreland, and Blawith, co. Lancaster; descended from West Riddlesden). Motto—De Monte Alto. Ar. three bars gemelles sa. over all a lion ramp. gu. charged on the shoulder with a cross crosslet fitchée or. Crest—A lion's head couped gu. charged with a cross crosslet fitchée or.
3) (Viscount Hawarden). Motto—Virtute securus. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. a lion ramp. ar.; 2nd and 3rd, ar.; three bars gemelles sa. over all a lion ramp. gu. charged on the shoulder with a cross crosslet, fitchée or. Crest—A lion’s gamb erased and erect ppr. holding an oak branch slipped, vert, acorned or. Supporters—Two lions ramp. each charged on the breast with a cross crosslet fitchée or.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Maud Coat of Arms and Family Crest

Maud Origin:

England

Origins of Maud:

Listed in many forms containing as Maud, Maude, Mawd, the little Maudett and Mauditt, and the patronymics Maudson and Mawson, this is an old English surname. It is a metronymic form of the female given name "Maw," itself having four possible origins. Firstly, Maw may have started as a different nickname for someone related to an important local character, from the Olde English pre 7th century "mage," meaning a female relative. Secondly, it may have started as a nickname for one considered to bear a fancied similarity to a sea-mew, from the Olde English "moew," a mew. Thirdly, the name may have been geographical for one living in a pasture, as in Sibilla de la Mawe of Suffolk in 1273, and finally it may be a nickname form of the Norman female special name Matilda, itself a combination of the Germanic components "maht", meaning might or power, and "hild", a war. One Galfridus Mawe noted in the Pipe Rolls of Lincolnshire in 1199, Geoffrey Maud in the Hundred Rolls of Hampshire in year1273, while William Mawson noted in the Calverley Charters, Yorkshire, dated 1382. Surnames became necessary when governments introduced personal taxation. In England, this was sometimes known as the Poll Tax.

More common variations are: Maude, Maudy, Mauad, Mauda, Maudi, Maudu, Maoud, Maudo, Maiud, Meaud.

England:

The surname Maud first appeared in Cheshire where the family of Maude, originally the Lords of Monte Alto, in Italy, settled in the Lordships and estates of Montalt and Hawarden in the division of Flint.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Maud had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Maud landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Maud who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Daniel Maud, who landed in Boston, Massachusetts in 1636. Elizabeth Parr Maud, who came to Pennsylvania in 1682. Jane Maud, who landed in Pennsylvania in 1682.

People with the surname Maud who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Jacob Maud arrived in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1751. John Maud who settled with his wife and four children in Boston Massachusetts in 1769. Joseph Maud, who arrived in New York in 1789.

The following century saw more Maud surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Maud who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas C Maud, who landed in Iowa in 1886.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Maud who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Charles Maud arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "John Munn" in 1849. R.S. Maud arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship "John Munn" in 1849.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Maud: France 1,041; England 468; South Africa 438; Ghana 399; Indonesia 132; United States 129; Australia 123; India 114; Argentina 90; New Zealand 80.

Notable People:

Maud Mulder (born 1981), was a Dutch musician.

Maud Powell (1867–1920), was an American violinist.

Maud Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Maud blazon are the lion, barry and lion’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9 10 11. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13, a sentiment echoed equally today.

When the field of the shield is filled with alternately coloured horizontal lines, this is known as barry, obviously because it is like having many separate bars across the field 14. Such shields have great clarity from a distance, those awarded by Henry III of England to Richard de Grey were, for example, Barry argent and azure, simple blue and white horizontal stripes. According to Wade, there was no specific meaning to be attached to barry itself, but it affords the opportunity to display at equal importance two colours that may themselves have specific meanings 15.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts.16 The head of the lion also appears alone on many coats of arms, but its use in this form is largely to enable a clear difference from similar arms that use the complete animal, and its significance should be taken to be the same as the lion entire, being a symbol of “deathless courage”. 17

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References

  • 1 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
  • 2 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
  • 4 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 5 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 6 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 7 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
  • 8 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
  • 9 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
  • 10 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
  • 11 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
  • 12 A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
  • 13 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
  • 14 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barry
  • 15 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P55
  • 16 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
  • 17 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P59