Maurice Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Maurice Family Coat of Arms

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Maurice Coat of Arms Meaning

Maurice Name Origin & History

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Maurice Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Maurice blazon are the lion, wolf, rose and buck’s head. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, argent and sable .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

The wolf was the symbol of Rome long before the advent of heraldry, and before that was sacred to the ancient Egyptians. 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31 In heraldry it is probably more often just as head than the whole animal, but when whole it can be in many different poses. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf It is found from the earliest instances of arms, but quite often due to a derivative of its French name, loup sharing the initial sound of many family names like LOWE and LOVATT.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Maurice Name

Maurice Origin:

England, Wales, France

Origin of Maurice:

Listed in many recordings of the surname as Maur, Maure, Mauret, Maurice in English and French, Mauro in Italian, Mauri and Mor in Portugese, Moro in Spanish and much more. It is a Roman(Latin) surname, of Christian origins. It is traditional and acquires from word “maurus” which means Moorish, or bright or dark. It was on the basis that the Moors from Morocco were black, and they introduced themselves to the world especially by attacking communities of Spain and conquering almost all of the Roman army. It is because of that, during the Dark Ages from the 5th to 10th-century a.d, the name as Maur in its many different formations, became a famous name in the time before surnames, introduced in the Christian world as an introduction name for any child with black hair or dark coloring. It developed into Britain by the Norman-French attackers after 1066, it was first listed in the Latinized form as Mauricius de Edligtona in the records of the Danelaw for the city of London in 1176, with the first documentations of the surname afterward only shortened form.

Variations:

More common variations of this name are: Mauricea, Maeurice, Mauriece, Maurrice, Maaurice, Maureice, Mauerice, Marice, Murice, Maurce.

England:

The surname Maurice was first organized in Herefordshire, where culture, according to the Professor Ormerod, finds the family name to have descended from Athelstan, Glodryadd, Godson of Athelston, the lord of England who developed the four Royal clans of Wales, and on his mother’s side rejected from Caradoc Vriechfras, King of Hereford, one of the champions of the Round Table. Descendants were Hoedliw Goch ap Rhys, Gwrgenau ap Hoedliw Goch, Grono ap Gwrgenau, Griffith ap Grono, Madoc ap Griffith, Howel ap Madoc, Phillip Dorddu ap Howel, Cadwgan second son of Phillip and much more, to Mory’s ap Morgan. Also, Evan Maurice who was the smallest son of Maurice ap Morgan who moved to Kent, his son Sir William Maurice hold the lands of the hamlet of Chuston in West Putford.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Jasce Mauricii, which was dated 1191. It shows in the Pipe Rolls of the City of London. It was during the time of King Richard I, who was known to be the “The Lionheart,” dated 1189 – 1199.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Maurice settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Maurice who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Roger Maurice, who settled in New England in 1631. William Maurice, who arrived in Virginia in 1637. John Maurice, who came to Maryland in 1650. Elizabeth Maurice, who came to Maryland in 1654. George Maurice, who arrived in Virginia in 1656.

Some of the people with the name Maurice who settled in the United States in the 18th century included Samuel Maurice, who settled in New York in 1795. George Maurice arrived in Charles Town, South Carolina in 1796.

Some of the people with the name Maurice who settled in the United States in the 19th century included Thomas Maurice, at the age of 23, settled in New York, NY in 1812. James Maurice, who landed in New York, NY in 1816. Ann Maurice settled in New York in 1820. Germain Maurice, who landed in Texas in 1844. Eduard Maurice, who arrived in San Francisco, California in 1850.

Canada:

Some of the people with the name Maurice who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Anne Maurice, at the age of 29, Marie Maurice, at the age of 24, and Rose Maurice, at the age of 24, all arrived in St Pierre and Miquelon in the same year in 1767.

Australia:

Some of the people with the name Maurice who settled in Australia in the 19th century included Price Maurice arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Caleb Angas” in 1840. Augusta Maurice arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Eliza” in 1849. Augusta Maurice, at the age of 28 came to South Australia in 1849 aboard the ship “Eliza.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Maurice: United States 4,823; Canada 3,794; Egypt 19,203; France 15,307; Nigeria 8,864; Haiti 7,041, Madagascar 5,384; Rwanda 3,578; Uganda 3,361, Kenya 2,982.

Notable People:

Benoît Maurice (born 1971), was a French football player.

Charles G. Maurice (1911–1997), was an American professor of dentistry and administrator of Endodontics.

Clément Maurice (1853–1933), was a French cameraman.

David Maurice (1626–1702), was a Welsh priest.

Jean-Eudes Maurice (born 1986), was a French-born Haitian football player.

Maurice Family Gift Ideas

Browse Maurice family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Brynygwalie, co. Denbigh, and Bodynfol, co. Montgomery; descended, through Llewelyn Voelgrwn, Lord of Main, from Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, Prince of Powys; the only dau. and heir of the late Rev. Richard Maurice, of Brynygwalie, m. John Bonner, Esq., and their son, Robert Maurice Bonner Maurice, Esq., purchased the estate of Bodynfol, co. Montgomery). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. on a bend ar. three escallops gu.; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a lion pass. sa. a bordure indented gu. Crests—1st: A unicorn’s head erased sa. winged ar. horned, maned, and bearded or, holding in the mouth a shamrock ppr.; 2nd: A lion pass. sa., as in the arms.
2) (Lloran, co. Denbigh, and Pentrekenrick, co. Salop; descended from Einion Efell, one of the sons of Madoc ap Meredydd ap Bleddyn ap Cynfyn, Prince of Powys. The Rev. Thomas Maurice, the learned author of "Indian Antiquities," &c., was of the Pentrekenrick family). Per fesse sa. and ar. a lion ramp. counterchanged of the field, armed and langued gu.
3) (Astrad, co. Denbigh; descended frnm Ririd Flaidd, Lord of Penllyn, North Wales). Ar. a chev. betw. three wolves’ heads erased sa.
4) (Myrod Llanhassaph, co. Flint). Sa. three roses ar.
5) Gu. a lion ramp. reguard. or. Crest—A hawk perching upon the stump of a tree or, armed and belled gu.
6) Gu. three roses ar.
(Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1620, Jasper Maurice). A chev. removed betw. three bucks’ heads cabossed.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P31
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Wolf
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133