Melbourne Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Melbourne Family Coat of Arms

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Melbourne Coat of Arms Meaning

Melbourne Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Melbourne. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Melbourne Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Melbourne blazon are the crescent, cross moline, escallop and chevron. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and gules .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67, or fanciful, decorative endings to the arms of the cross 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128. The cross moline is typical of these whereby each arm of the cross expands and curves outwards, reminscent of the fer-de-moline from which it gets its name. These cross variations are probably largely for decorative effect, and to differentiate the arms from similar ones and hence their significance is that of the Christian cross itself.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 17The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Melbourne Name

Melbourne Origin:

England

Origins of Melbourne:

This famous surname was noted in many spellings including Melborn, Melbourn and Melbourne, is English. The worldwide International Genealogical Index lists it in a similar group as the similar surname of Milburn, but in fact there is no connection, although, over the centuries, spellings have overlapped and become ‘combined’ in some case. This surname which historically at least, is likely to be forever related to Lord Melbourne, the first Prime Minister to Queen Victoria in 1837, and is from any of the three places in England so named. These is Melbourn in Cambridge, noted as Mellburna in the Domesday Book of 1086, and meaning the ‘stream (burna) where meld (a herb) grows’, in Yorkshire from Melbourne noted as Middelburne in Domesday Book, and probably meaning the middle stream between two other rivers although this not proven, or Melbourne in Derbyshire meaning ‘mill stream’ and from where Lord Melbourne acquired his peerage. His surname, however, was Lamb, not Melbourne. It is unclear as to when the surname was first noted. As a locational name, it was one which was given to a person after they departed from their original home to move to any other place, although that could be as close as the next hamlet. In this example, an early record is that of Leonard Melbourne of Romaldkirk, in North Yorkshire, in June 1650.

Variations:

More common variations are: Mellbourne, Melbourn, Melborne, Melburne, Milbourne, Malbourne, Mellbourne, Molbourne, Melbroune, Melburn.

England:

The surname Melbourne first appeared in Northumberland where they held a family seat from old times and their first records appeared on the early poll rolls derived by the early Kings of Britain to decide the rate of taxation of their subjects. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Melbourne had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the name Melbourne who landed in Australia in the 19th century included John Melbourne at the age of 4, arrived in South Australia in the year 1860 aboard the ship “Schah Jehan”. Margaret Melbourne at the age of 24, who was a dressmaker, arrived in South Australia in the same year 1860 aboard the ship “Schah Iehan.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Melbourne: England 1,269; United States 969; Jamaica 625; Australia 581; Canada 330; New Zealand 114; Wales102; Scotland 85; France 49; Guyana 44.

Notable People:

Viscount Melbourne, 1st Viscount of Kilmore in the Division of Cavan, was a title in the Peerage of Ireland held by the Lamb family. This family descended from Matthew Lamb, who showed Stockbridge and Peterborough in the House of Commons. In 1755, he made a baronet, of Brocket Hall in the Division of Hertford, in the Baronetage of Great Britain. He married Charlotte, daughter of Thomas Coke, through which wedding Melbourne Hall in Derbyshire came into the Lamb family.

William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne, PC, FRS (March 1779 – November 1848), usually marked as Lord Melbourne, was a British Whig statesman who gave services as Home Secretary (1830–1834) and Prime Minister (1834 and 1835–1841). He is well known for his powerful and successful mentoring of Queen Victoria, at ages 18–21, in the ways of politics. Professors have concluded that Melbourne does not rank high as a prime minister, for there were no great foreign wars or domestic issues to handle, he lacked major performances, and he expressed no grand principles. “But he was kind, honest and not self-seeking.” He replaced by King William IV in 1834, the last British prime minister to be replaced by a ruler.

Frederick James Lamb, 3rd Viscount Melbourne, GCB PC (April 1782 – January 1853), known as The Lord Beauvale from the year 1839 to 1848, was a British politician. He was a younger son of Peniston Lamb, 1st Viscount Melbourne, and his wife Elizabeth Milbanke, and the younger brother of Prime Minister William Lamb, 2nd Viscount Melbourne. Since his mother had numerous lovers, his real origin is a matter of opinion. He married Alexandrina Julia Theresa Wilhelmina Sophia Gräfin von Maltzan, daughter of Joachim Charles Leslie Mortimer Graf von Maltzan.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Ar. a crescent and a bordure sa.
2) Ar. a cross moline sa. quarter pierced of the field.
3) Gu. a chev. betw. three escallops ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P128
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91