Meldon Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Meldon Family Coat of Arms

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Meldon Coat of Arms Meaning

Meldon Name Origin & History

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Meldon Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Meldon blazon are the hand and crescent. The three main tinctures (colors) are vert, argent and or .

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The hand, unless we are told otherwise is a dexter (right) hand shown palm outwards and fingers upwards.9A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305. It demonstrates faith, sincerity and justice, and in the form of two right hands clasped can mean union or alliance10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92. There is a special form called the “Hand of Ulster” which is a sinister hand gules on an argent background (a left hand, red upon white). Originally the Badge of Ulster, the Province of Northern Ireland, it has come to be used as an addition to existing arms, in an escutcheon (small shield) or canton (small square) to indicate that the holder is also a Baronet.11Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Meldon Name

Meldon Origin:

Ireland

Origins of Meldon:

Listed with the spellings of Muldoon and Meldon, this is a famous Irish surname of royal origins. It is definitely related to the region of Ulster and especially County Fermanagh. Historically, it is said that the O’Maolduin’s (as spelled in the Gaelic) were of royal birth, being styled as the kings of Lurg in the book known as ‘The annals of Loch Ce.’ However, in about the year 1400 the tribe was destroyed in battle by the MacGuires, and while they continued to be of importance in Ulster, elsewhere in the country their power bases slightly decreased away. It seems that in Division Clare for example, the Muldoons became Malones, while in County Sligo, where they resided the barony of Tireragh, they were virtually dead by 1830. The surname has still some influence in Division Galway. The name means ‘the fortress,’ and is a limited example of an Irish surname which is domestic as most surnames acquire from the nickname of the original chief. The prefix O’ meaning ‘descendant of’ is rarely if ever appeared after the 18th century. Early recordings of the surname include Felim O’Muldoon, a commander of the United Army of Ireland in 1640. He was killed at the battle of Dungannon in 1642. A possible earlier record is that of Connor O’Muldowne in Wexford in 1551, although there is some dispute as to whether he was a Muldoon or a Muldowney. In the spelling of Meldon, this may be either Irish or occasionally English in origin. Austin Meldon of Dublin, (1843 – 1904), Director of the Royal Society of Irish Surgeons, declared descent from the Muldoons of Lurg.

Variations:

More common variations are: Mieldon, Melidon, Meldone, Meldoon, Mldon, Melidoni, Melidona, Melidone, Meldoyan, Meliodon.

Ireland:

The surname Meldon first appeared in Division Sligo (Irish: Sligeach), in the province of Connacht in Northwestern Ireland, where they had been anciently seated at Enniscrone and said to be directly declined from King Niall of the Nine Hostages, Ireland’s General Commander/King who passed away in the fourth century. From his twelve sons, many tribes declined to contain as O’Caomhain who controlled the clans from the River Gleoir to the Easky, a region of land which contained the homes of about 30 tribes, including the Muldoons.

Many of the people with surname Meldon had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Some of the people with the name Meldon who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Sarah Meldon, who came to Baltimore in 1827.

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Meldon who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included John Meldon, Eliza M. Meldon, Mary J. Meldon, Bedelia Meldon and Kate J. Meldon, all arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Rodney” in 1875.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Meldon: United States 190; England 81; Ireland 71; Australia 54; New Zealand 9; Russia 6; Canada 4; Ukiaine 4; India 1; Spain 1.

Notable People:

Philip Meldon (1874–1942), was an Irish cricket player and soccer player.

Meldon Family Gift Ideas

Browse Meldon family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(confirmed to Charles Henry Meldon, Esq., of 25, Rutland Square, and of Newtown House, Blackrock, co. Dublin, M.P., and the descendants of his grandfather, Anthony Dillon Muldoon, of Fore, co. Westmeath, of Celtic origin). Motto—Pro fide et patria. Vert a dexter hand couped ar. betw. three crescents or, issuant therefrom as many estoiles of the second. Crest—A dexter hand ppr. surmounted by a crescent or. therefrom issuant an estoile ar.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, J.B. Parker, 1894 P305
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W Cecil Wade 1898 P92
11. Heraldry Historical and Popular, Charles Boutell, 1864 P56
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106