Meles Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Meles Family Coat of Arms

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Meles Coat of Arms Meaning

Meles Name Origin & History

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Meles Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Meles blazon are the torteaux, martlet and tree stump. The two main tinctures (colors) are argent and gules.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146 One of the simplest such shapes is the plain circle, known to heralds as the roundle. 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle So popular is this charge that a shorthand has arisen for roundles of a particular colour and torteau is a roundle gules, or red. (We must be careful however not to confuse this with the word in French heraldry, in which torteau means roundle and must have the colour specified.) Most authorities agree that the English usage signifies the “Manchet cake” or communion wafer and thus is a symbol of religious allegiance.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407. Sometimes the species or the part of tree was chosen as an allusion to the name of the bearer, as in Argent three tree stumps (also known as stocks) sable” for Blackstock 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309 Trees of course had long been venerated and its use in a coat of arms may have represented some association with the god Thor 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Meles Name

Origins of Meles:
The surname Meles is a name that carried to England in the great wave of migration from Normandy following the Norman Invasion of 1066.  The Meles family resided in Melhuish in Devon.  The surname Meles is a habitation name that originally acquired from pre-existing names for towns, hamlets, churches, or farmsteads.  The surname originated as a source of identifying individuals from a particular area.  In the Middle Ages, people often thought the name of the place that they originally resided as their surname during travel.

Variations:
More common variations are: Meales, Melles, Meyles, Melese, Mieles, Meless, Melesi, Melies, Meleas, Meeles.

England:
The surname Meles first appeared in Devon where they held a family seat from old times as Lords of the Estate of Melhuish in that shire, some say, well before the Norman Invasion of England in 1066 A.D. The original name of the hamlet was Melewis.  Conjecturally the family name descended from Hugh of Rennes, holder of the hamlet of Melhuish from Baldwin, Sheriff of Devon at the time of the taking of the Domesday Book Survey in 1086 A.D.

United States of America:
Individuals with the surname Meles landed in the United States in the 20th century.  Some of the people with the name Meles who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Nick Meles at the age of 29, arrived in Texas in the year 1906.  Constantine Meles, who came to Texas in the year 1910.  Nek Meles who landed in Texas in the same year 1910.

Meles Family Gift Ideas

Browse Meles family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(Meles, co. Lancaster). Ar. three torteaux in fesse, a bordure gu. Crest—On the stump of a tree a martlet ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
2. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
3. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Roundle
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P309
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P112