Mercier Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mercier Family Coat of Arms

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Mercier Coat of Arms Meaning

Mercier Name Origin & History

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Mercier Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Mercier blazon are the boar, crescent, border engrailed and huntsman. The two main tinctures (colors) are or and gules.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.4The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

In the middle ages, the wild boar, a far more fearsome creature than its domesticated relative, the pig was a much more commonly seen animal than today. It was also known as a sanglier. 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72 It can appear in many of the same poses that we see for the lion, but has its own (easily imagined!) position known as enraged! 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar We should not be surprised then that this “fierce combatant” is said to be associated with the warrior. 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

The border, (sometimes bordure) is a band running around the edge of the shield, following the edge contours and being differently coloured, possibly holding a series of small charges placed on top of it 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bordure. To distinguish it from similar arms, heraldic artists developed a series of decorative edges (obviously these are applied only to the inner edge). A common form of this patterning, engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mercier Name

Mercier Origin:

England, France

Origins of Mercier:

The surname of Mercier is said to be an occupational surname from the country of France. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Mercier most likely was a merchant, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. In the case of the surname of Mercier, the original bearers of this surname were dealers in clothes, coming from the Old French word “mercer” which can be translated to mean “a dealer in clothes.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Mericier, Murcier, Marcier, Morcier

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Mercier can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of William Mercer or William le Mercer, who was a witness to two charters in favor of the Abbey of Kelso in the year of 1200. This charter was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King John of England, who was known throughout the ages and commonly referred to as one “The Lackland.” King John of England ruled from the year of 1199 to the year of 1216. Other mentions of the surname of Mercier can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of one Aleumnus Mercer, who was party to a bond that was given by Alexander 11 to Henry III in the year of 1244, as an action to keep the peace between the two countries.

Scotland:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Mercier within the country of Scotland was one Geoffrey Mercer, who along with William Mercer were known as “the mercers of Scotland.” Both Geoffrey and William were said to have had their good stolen by a stranger in the night, and no one came forward for this crime. Another mention of the surname of Mercier in the country of Scotland can be traced to one Duncan Mersar, who was a witness in Aberdeen in the year of 1272. One person by the name of Austyn le Mercer served as the burgess of Roxburgh.

United States of America:

Throughout the 17th and 18th centuries, it became common for European citizens to migrate to the United States of America in search of a better life for them and their families. These citizens, often displeased with the state of the government of their homelands migrated to the United States because of the freedoms that were promised to those who moved there. These freedoms included the ability to own land and property, the ability to believe in whatever gods or idols they wanted, and the ability to have better, cleaner living conditions for them and their families. This large movement of people was known as the European Migration. Among those who migrated to the United States was one Jacquine Mercier, who arrived in North Carolina in the year of 1695, the first Mercier in the U.S.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mercier: France 52,265; Canada 17,738; United States 10,104; Haiti 5,929; Belgium 2,168; Germany 1,513; Switzerland 1,386; Ivory Coast 1,315; Brazil 811; England 624; Cameroon 595

Notable People:

Jason Mercier (born in 1986) who was a professional poker player from America.

Wilhelmina Mercier, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Michigan in the year of 1972, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Pierre J. Mercier, who served as a Candidate for the New York State Assembly in the 8th District in the year of 2000.

Paul B. Mercier, who served as Member of the New York State Assembly from Oneida County in the 1st District in the year of 1936 to the year of 1937, and who was defeated in the year of 1938, and who was a politician from America.

Leon N. Mercier, who served as a Member of the Connecticut State House of Representatives from Plainfield in the year of 1918, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Laurence J. Mercier, who served as a Candidate for the Michigan State House of Representatives from Genesee County in the 2nd District in the year of 1938.

George Mercier, who served as a Candidate for the U.S. Senator from the state of Utah in the year of 1982, and who was a Libertarian politician from America.

Mercier Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

(co. Northumberland). Motto—Toujours fidèle. Or, a fesse chequy az. and ar. betw. two boars’ heads in chief sa. and a crescent in base gu. a bordure engr. of the last. Crest—A demi huntsman winding a horn ppr. vested az., motto over, Blow shrill.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 72
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Boar
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P67
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Bordure