Millington Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Millington Family Coat of Arms

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Millington Coat of Arms Meaning

Millington Name Origin & History

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Millington Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Millington blazon are the millstone, eagle, fish and garb. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and sable .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The ENTRY is a typical example of this. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

Fish in great variety abound in Heraldry, many different species inhabit coats of arms 13Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P150, although truth be told many of the actual images are sometimes indistinguishable, being shown as a stylised, and easily recognised “trout” shape 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P137 that a child might draw. The actual name used in the coat of arms may be some play-on-words or allusion to the family name, as in the famous arms of the de Lucy family, being “Gules, three lucies or”, 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 79 this being an ancient name for the fish we call today a “pike”.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Millington Name

Millington Origin:

England

Origins of Millington:

This name is of English geographical origin from any of the two places so called as Milington in Cheshire, listed as Mulintune in the Domesday Book of 1086, and Milington in the East Riding of Yorkshire founding as Milleton in the Domesday Book. The name in both situations acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century “Mylen – tun” which means “the tun (farm or settlement) with a mill.” The surname from the second origin was first listed in the early 13th Century. One, John Millington, of Millington near Bowdon, shows in “Wills Registers of East Cheshire” near the year 1530. An interesting name ancestor was Sir Thomas Millington (1628 – 1704) professor of natural philosophy at Oxford (1675), court specialist and knighted (1680).

Variations:

More common variations are: Milington, Miillington, Milliigton, Millinghton, Millngton, Mllington, Mullington, Mellington, Mallington, Milingtone, Mellington.

England:

The surname Millington first appeared in Cheshire at Millington, a local church or Millington, a small hamlet and local church in the East Riding of Yorkshire. Both recorded in the Domesday Book of 1086. The Cheshire church recorded as Mulintune and at that time was held by William Malbank. Rather small, it had estate enough for one farming. However, the Yorkshire listings pronounced as Mileton, Milleton and Milletone and each had their entry.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Peter de Milington , dated about 1206, in the “The Fine Court Rolls of Yorkshire.” It was during the time of King John, who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199-1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Millington had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Millington settled in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Millington who settled in the United States in the 17th century included Rowland Millington settled in St. Christopher in 1635. Rowland Millington landed in St Christopher in 1635. Joan Millington, who arrived in Virginia in 1650. Joan Millington and her husband who settled in Virginia in 1650. Samuel Millington, who came to Maryland in 1661.

The following century saw more Millington surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Millington who settled in the United States in the 19th century included John W Millington, who landed in New York in 1831. George H Millington, who landed in New York, NY in 1849.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Millington who settled in Australia in the 19th century included William Millington, an English prisoner from Warwick, who shifted aboard the “Albion” in May 1828, settling in New South Wales, Australia. James Henry Millington arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Surrey” in 1838. William Millington, an English prisoner from Staffordshire, who shifted aboard the “Adelaide” in August 1849, settling in Van Diemen’s Land and Harbor Phillip, Australia. William Millington arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Blundell” in 1851.

New-Zealand:

Some of the people with the surname Millington who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Simon Millington, Rosanna Millington, Robert Millington, Samuel Millington and Jesse Millington, all arrived in Otago aboard the ship “City of Dunedin” in the same year 1871.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Millington: England 6,808; United States 3,241; Australia 1,333; Canada 762; Wales 361; Barbados 318; Germany 303; Trinidad and Tobago 300; New Zealand 291; South Africa 237.

Notable People:

Ernest Millington (1916–2009), was a British political leader.

Grenville Millington (born 1951), was a Chester City football player.

Lucy Millington (1825–1900), was an American biologist.

Margaret Millington (1944–1973), was an English-born mathematician.

Mary Millington (1945–1979), was a British porn star.

Mil Millington was a British writer.

Ross Millington (born 1989), is a British long-distance runner.

Millington Family Gift Ideas

Browse Millington family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Millington, co. Chester; the heiress m. Sir John Thorold, Bart., 1796). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. three millstones ar.; 2nd and 2rd, ar. an eagle displ. az.
2) (co. Essex). Ar. an eagle displ. with two heads sa.
3) (co. Chester). Ar. on a cross engr. az. five garbs or.
4) (co. Devon). Gu. a chev. betw. three fishes naiant ar.
5) (co. Dorset). Gu. a chev. betw. three mullets ar. (another, or).
6) (co. Suffolk). Ar. a fesse betw. two chevronels gu.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
13. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P150
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P137
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 79