Mills Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mills Family Coat of Arms

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Mills Coat of Arms Meaning

Mills Name Origin & History

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Mills Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Mills blazon are the millrind and mullet. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, azure and or .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The mill-rind, also known by a rather surprising number of names (fer-de-moline, inkmoline, mill-ink amongst others) is a distinctive symbol, but hard to place by modern viewers. It is a square or diamond shape with arms extending above and below and in fact represents the piece of iron that connects a circular timber axle to a mill-stone, used for grinding corn. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fer-de-moline These would obviously have been more familiar to those of the middle ages than they are today.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 11A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mills Name

Mills Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Mills:

The surname of Mills is said to have derived in the countries of Scotland and England. It is believed that the surname of Mills is of a topographical variety. A topographical surname was given to someone who lived on or near a prominent structure within the area from which the person hailed. This means that everyone within this area could distinguish the man-made or natural structure that was being used to describe a person. In this case, the surname of Mills was given to someone who lived near a mill. The surname of Mills can be derived from the Middle English words of “mille” or “milne” which can both be translated to mean “mill.” These Middle English words themselves come from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “mylen” or “mylene” which itself comes from the Latin word “molina” which comes from the Latin word “molere” and can be translated to mean “to grind.” The “s” added at the end of this surname of Mills indicates that it is patronymic, meaning that the surname was often given to the son of the original bearer of the surname, or given to someone who was the son of someone who lived on or near a mill. Eventually, this surname became used for someone who worked in a mill. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Mills actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son.

Variations:

More common variations are: Milles, Millson, Miles, Mylls, Mylles, Millis, Milles, Millas, Miells, Millus

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Mills can be found within the country of England. One person by the name of Richard de le Melle was mentioned in the Curia Regis Rolls of the County of Sussex in the year of 1200. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King John of England, who was known throughout the ages as one “The Lackland” and who ruled from the year 1199 to the year 1216. Other mentions of the surname of Mills throughout the country of England included one Richard Mille, who was recorded in the Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire in the year of 1279. Those who carry the surname of Mills throughout the country of England can be found in high concentrations in the areas of Hampshire, Yorkshire, and Lancashire. It is also said that those who are known by the surname of Mills can be found in the southeastern coastal areas of the country of England.

Scotland:

Those who carry the surname of Mills can be found in the country of Scotland. The area with the highest concentration of those who bear the surname of Mills is in Lanarkshire County.

United States of America:

Within the United States of America, there is a population of people who are known by the surname of Mills. These people can be found within the states of California, New York, Texas, Illinois, North Carolina, Virginia, and Pennsylvania.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mills: United States 165,638; England 45,478; Ghana 29,236; Australia 20,947; Canada 17,249; South Africa 12,109; New Zealand 3,943; Scotland 3,111; Jamaica 2,838; Wales 2,720

Notable People:

Sherron Mills (1971-2016) who was a National Basketball Association (NBA) basketball player from America

William Ellison Mills who was a politician from America and served as a Member of the New York State Assembly from Fulton and Hamilton counties from the year 1906 to the year 1908

William F. R. Mills who was a Republican politician from America and the mayor of Denver, Colorado from the year 1918 to the year 1919

William Joseph Mills (1849-1915) who was a politician from America and a Member of the Connecticut State Senate from the year 1881 to the year 1882 as well as a Justice from the New Mexico Territorial Supreme Court from the year 1898 to the year 1910 and who was also the Governor of the New Mexico Territory from the year 1910 to the year 1912

William Oswald Mills (1924-1973) who was a Republican politician from America and a United States Representative from the Maryland in the 1st District from the year 1971 to the year 1973 as well as a Delegate to the Republican National Convention for Maryland in the year 1972

Mills Family Gift Ideas

Browse Mills family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bisterne, co. Hants). (Hillingdon Court, and Camelford House, Park Lane, London, bart.). Motto—Nil conscire sibi. Gyronny of six ar. and az. a millrind sa. Crest—A demi lion reguard. or, gorged with a collar gemel az. betw. the paws a millrind sa.
2) (Casnalbery, co. Hertford, and co. Bedford; granted Nov. 1613). Barry of ten ar. and vert, over all six escutcheons gu. three, two, and one. Crest—A wing barry of ten ar. and vert.
3) (Knightington, co. Berks). Erm. a millrind sa. a chief or. Crest—A lion ramp, or, holding in the mouth a sinister hand gu.
4) (Lexden Park, Colchester, co. Essex ; granted 4 Jan. 1800). Az. a cross pattte betw. four mullets or, each charged with a pellet. Crest—A hurt charged with an estoile or.
5) (co. Essex). Gyronny of eight ar. and az. a millrind sa. Crest—A demi lion ramp. reguard. or, holding betw. the paws a millrind sa.
6) (Harscomb, co. Gloucester, and Croydon, co. Surrey). (Clermont Lodge, co. Norfolk). Motto—Deo adjuvante. (Saxham Hall, co. Suffolk). Motto—Confido. Erm. a millrind sa. Crest—A lion ramp. or.
7) Same Arms. Crest—A demi lion ramp. or, holding in the paws a millrind sa.
8) (Bitterne, co. Hants, temp. Queen Elizabeth). Paly of six ar. and sa. over all on a fesse gu. three mullets or. Crest—On a mural coronet gu. an escallop ar.
9) (Tolmers, co. Herts). Motto—Deo adjuvante. Erm. a millrind sa., quartering 1st, ar. six lions, three, two, and one sa.; 2nd, az. a mullet pierced ar.; 3rd, per chev. or and az. three mullets counterchanged. Crest—A lion ramp. or.
10) (Norton Court, co. Kent). Erm. a millrind sa. on a chief az. two marlions' wings or. Crest—On a chapeau gu. turned up erm. a millrind sa. betw. two marlions' wings of the second.
11) (co. Middlesex). Motto—Honor virtutis pretium. Erm. a millrind sa. Crest—On a ducal coronet a lion ramp. gu.
12) (London; descended from co. Cornwall). Az. a millrind in fesse or. Crest—A paschal lamb pass. ar. unguled or, bearing on the dexter shoulder a banner of St. George double pennoned.
13) (co. Suffolk). Paly of six ar. and sa. Crest—A demi bear ramp. sa. muzzled, collared, and chained or.
14) (Reg. Ulster's Office). Az. two swans in pale ar. betw. as many flaunches erm.
15) Az. a cross pattee pierced betw. two mullets pierced or. Crest—On a hurt an estoile pierced or.
16) Erm. a millrind sa. pierced of the field. Crest—On a ducal coronet or, a lion ramp. gu.
17) Ar. a bend betv. two lions' beads erased sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fer-de-moline
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
11. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105