Milward Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Milward Family Coat of Arms

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Milward Coat of Arms Meaning

Milward Name Origin & History

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Milward Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Milward blazon are the bezant, fesse, millrind and crescent. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and ermine .

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Or is the heraldic metal Gold, often shown as a bold, bright yellow colour. It is said to show “Generosity and elevation of the mind” 4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35. Later heralds, of a more poetic nature liked to refer to it as Topaz, after the gemstone, and, for obvious reasons associated it with the Sun 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In drawings without colour it is usually represented by many small dots, or by the letter ‘O’ 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the bezant Is a typical example of this, and in British Heraldry always takes the tincture or. It shares the same root as the name Byzantium, being associated with the gold coin of that city and indeed, in some heraldic traditions is represented as a coin-like disk in perspective. Wade suggests that the use of this device refers to ” one who had been found worthy of trust and treasure.” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122

The fesse (also found as fess) is one of the major ordinaries to found in heraldry, being a bold, broad, horizontal band across the centre of the shield. It may originally have arisen from the planks of which a wooden shield can be constructed, the centremost plank being painted a different colour 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse. It is instantly recognisable as a symbol, for example the arms of COLEVILLE granted during the reign of Hery III are simply or, a fesse gules. With this clear association with the construction of the shield itself, Wade believes that the fesse can be taken to be associated with the military, as a “girdle of honour”.

The mill-rind, also known by a rather surprising number of names (fer-de-moline, inkmoline, mill-ink amongst others) is a distinctive symbol, but hard to place by modern viewers. It is a square or diamond shape with arms extending above and below and in fact represents the piece of iron that connects a circular timber axle to a mill-stone, used for grinding corn. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fer-de-moline These would obviously have been more familiar to those of the middle ages than they are today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Milward Name

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Ballyharran, co. Wexford, and Tullogher, co. Kilkenny; Clement Milward, Esq., Q.C., Alice Holt, co. Surrey, eldest surviving son of the late Admiral Clement Milward, R.N., of Tullogher, the great-grandson of Thomas Milward, Esq., of Ballyharran, whose father, Clement Milward, held the lands of Hillfields, in the Manor of Alehurst, under the Bishop of Gloucester, and settled at Enniscorthy, co. Wexford, 1696). Erm. on a fess gu. three plates. Crest—A dragon’s head couped vert betw. two wings gu.
2) (Sayer-Milward, St. Leonard’s, Wallingford, co. Berks; exemplified, 1856, to Sayer, on assuming, by royal licence, the surname of Milward). Motto—Bear and forbear. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Milward, erm. on a fesse gu. fimbriated or, three bezants, each charged with a chevronel of the second; 2nd and 3rd, Sayer, per chev. gu. and sa. a chev. erm. fimbriated or, betw. three sea mews ar. Crests—1st, Milward: Out of a wreath of oak or, a bear’s paw erect sa. holding a sceptre in pale and charged with a bar gold; 2nd, Sayer: A mount vert, thereon out of rays of the sun a dexter arm embowed in armour ppr. the hand also ppr. grasping a dragon’s head at the neck also vert.
3) (co. Bedford). Ar. a cross moline sa. betw. four crescents gu.
4) (Braxted, co. Essex). Erm. on a fesse gu. a fleur-de-lis ar. betw. two bezants. Crest—Out of a palisado coronet or, a lion's gamb sa. grasping a sceptre gold (another bears the crest without the coronet).
5) (Eaton Dovedale, co. Derby: six descents in Visit. 1611: the heiress m. Clarke, of Somersall. A younger branch became extinct in the male line at the decease, 1670, of John Milward Esq., of Snitterton in Darley; his co¬heiresses m. Boothby, Jennens, and Adderley). Erm. on a fesse gu. three plates. Crest—A lion’s paw issuing out of a wreath sa. grasping a sceptre or.
6) (Thurgarton Priory, co. Notts). Motto—Nec temere nec timide. Erm. on a fesse gu. three bezants. Crest—A lion's paw issuing sa. grasping a sceptre or.
7) (London). Sa. a millrind betw. three leopards’ faces ar.
8) (Batcomb, co. Somerset). Ar. a millrind sa. betw. four crescents gu.
9) (Manor House, Lechlade, co. Gloucester). Erm. a cross moline sa. betw. three torteaux, two and one, each. charged with a crescent or. Crest—Betw. two wings az. a bear's paw erased sa. claws or, holding a sceptre in bend sinister gold, entwined by a sprig of oak ppr.
10) (Millington, co. Chester; the heiress m. Sir John Thorold, Bart., 1796). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, az. three millstones ar.; 2nd and 2rd, ar. an eagle displ. az.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P76-77
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P122
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fesse
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fer-de-moline