Mitchell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mitchell Family Coat of Arms

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Mitchell Coat of Arms Meaning

Mitchell Name Origin & History

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Mitchell Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Mitchell blazon are the falcon, escallop and pegasus. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, argent and or .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Birds of great variety occur throughout heraldry, at least in name 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233. The falcon is a bird long associated with hunting and we need look no further than a liking for this pursuit for its presence on many early coats of arms. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon We also find many of the accessories used in falconry depicted on arms, and a surprising number of terms from the art of falconry have found use in modern English idioms and the interested reader is recommended to search out the origins of the phrases hoodwinked and “cadging” a lift.

The escallopoccurs often in arms, represented as the outside of the shell, sometimes “fluted” of a different colour 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop. It has been part of heraldic tradition almost from the beginning of the art, Henry III of England awarded Gules, 3 escallopes argent to Herbert de CHAMBERLEYNE in the 13th century, and it is present in the heraldry of almost all countries 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299. It is believed that they were adopted as badges of those going to the Holy Land and can be found in the arms of many a crusading family. Hence Wade’s suggested association of the scallop with those that “complete long journeys to far countries” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The pegasus Is a typical example of a mythical creature, as real to a person of the middle ages as dogs, cats and elephants are to us today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mitchell Name

Mitchell Origin:

England, Ireland, Scotland

Origins of Name:

The surname of Mitchell was said to have been introduced into Western Europe by both knights and crusaders returning from the Crusades to free the Holy Land. This surname derives from the medieval Hebrew word, and Biblical given baptismal name of “Michel,” which can be translated to mean “He who is like the Lord,” or “in the Lord’s image.” Another possible origin of the surname of Mitchell is that it is a locational surname. In this case, it was used to describe those who resided in Mitcham, in the county of Surrey, which is in the country of England. In the case of locational surnames, they were often used to describe the area from which someone hailed. It is more common that the name was used to differentiate newcomers who left their hometown in search of work, and it was determined that the best way to differentiate between strangers was by the town from which they came. The name then became hereditary.

Variations:

More common variations are: Mitchelson, Maitchell, Mitchelle, Mitchelli, Mitichell, Mitchella, Mmitchell, Mitchelly, Mitchhell, Wmitchell, Mitchaell, Matsell, Mitchell, Machel, Matchell, Mickle, Muckle

History:

England:

The surname of Mitchell was first recorded in the country of England. One person by the name of Gilbert Michel was mentioned in the Curia Regis Rolls of Northumberland, in the year of 1205. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King John I of England, who was commonly known as, and referred to throughout the ages as one “John Lackland.” King John I of England reigned from the year 1199 to the year 1216. Other mentions of the surname of Mitchell in the country of England include William Michel who was named in the Registers for England in 1219, and Richard Mukel, who was named in the Hundred Rolls of the Landowners of the County of Shropshire in the year 1255. Agnes Mitchell was recorded as marrying Richard Freeman at St. Dunstan’s in London in the year 1582. Those who carry the surname of Mitchell in the country of England can be found throughout all of the major counties and cities. The specific areas where those who bear this surname reside are in the county of Yorkshire, and in and around the city of London.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Mitchell are in a small concentration in the country of Scotland. Within the central part of the country, most of those who carry the surname of Mitchell reside. The areas with the largest concentration of those who are known by the surname of Mitchell are from Aberdeenshire to Ayrshire counties.

United States of America:

In the 17th Century, many European citizens became dissatisfied with the state of their countries. Thus, many of them moved to the United States of America in search of a better life. The United States, which at that time was referred to as The New World, or The Colonies, promised religious freedom, the availability of land, and better living conditions. The first person to bear the surname of Mitchell in the United States of America, was one Maudlin Mitchell, who settled in the state of Virginia in the year 1620. In the year 1623, Experience Mitchell traveled to Plymouth, Massachusetts and settled there. The areas with a larger concentration of those who are known by the Mitchell name are within the states of Alabama, Missouri, Georgia, Massachusetts, New York, and in the state of Texas.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mitchell: United States 409,021; England 64,154; Australia 37,197; Canada 34,415; South Africa 26,172; Scotland 12,699; Jamaica 8,031; New Zealand 6,042; Liberia 4,590; Trinidad and Tobago 4,074

Notable People:

Edgar Dean Mitchell (1930-2016) who was a pilot, engineer, and astronaut from America, was the sixth person in recorded history to walk on the Moon, and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom

Cheri Mitchell (1955-2015) who was a ballet director from America, and was the Executive Director of BalletMet from the year 2001 to the year 2015

James Richard “Jim” Mitchell who was a lawyer and horse breeder from America, who also served as a Division C Judge of the Louisiana 30th Judicial District Court for Vernon Parish from the year 2009 to the year 2015

Master Walter Dawson Mitchell Jr. (died in 1915) who was a Second Class passenger from Newark, New Jersey, ho was aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and perished in the sinking of the vessel, and whose body was recovered in the wreckage

Mr. Arthur Jackson Mitchell, who was a Second Class passenger from America, who at the time was residing in Toronto, Canada, and was aboard the RMS Lusitania at the time of the sinking, and escaped the vessel aboard life boat 15

Mitchell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Mitchell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Bodmin, co. Cornwall). Sa. a falcon close in fesse betw. two barrulets ar. in chief two falcons close or.
2) (Truro, co. Cornwall). Sa. an escallop betw. three birds’ heads erased or. Crest—A demi pegasus or, winged az. charged on the shoulder with a demi rose gu. divided fesaeways rays issuing from the division pendent ar.
3) (Stapleton Mitchell, co. Dorset, and co. York). Sa. a chev. or, betw. three escallops ar.
4) (Deptford, co. Kent). Motto—Moriendo modulor. Az. a chev. betw. three swans ar. Crest—A swan ppr.
5) (Enderby Hall, co. Leicester). Or, a chev. engr. betw. two mascles in chief and a ducal crown in base gu. Crest—A garb or, banded gu. pendent therefrom an escutcheon ar. charged with three slips of laurel vert.
6) (Llanfretcha Grange, co. Monmouth). Sa. a chev. betw. three escallops or. Crest—A garb of bearded wheat or.
7) Ar. a chev. purp. betw. seven heraldic tigers’ or dragons’ heads erect and erased vert, each devouring a cross crosslet fitchée gu. Crest—An arm embowed clothed in leaves vert, the hand ppr. holding a sword ar. hilt and pommel or, the point embrued and dropping with blood. Another Crest—A dexter arm erect holding a sword, rays of fire issuing from each side thereof all ppr.
8) Sa. a fesse betw. three mascles or. Crest—St. Michael, the archangel, in armour ppr. face, neck, arms, and legs bare, wings ar. hair auburn, in the dexter hand a spear of the first.
9) Per pale sa. and ar. three cranes’ heads erased counterchanged. Crest—An arm erect couped at the elbow, vested gu. cuffed ar. grasping a crane’s head erased ppr.
10) Ar. a chev. gu. surmounted by another erm. betw. two mascles in chief az. and a laurel branch slipped in base vert. Crest—A garb vert.
11) (confirmed by Hawkins, Ulster, 1724, to Patrick Mitchell, Doctor of Physic, descended from the co. Aberdeen, in Scotland). Sa. on a fess wavy betw. three mascles or, a crescent betw. two estoiles gu. Crest—An angel kneeling in a praying posture ppr.
12) (Mount Mitchell, co. Leitrim; allowed by Mac Culloch, Ulster, 1760, to Patrick Mitchell, of Bordeaux, in the Kingdom of France, merchant, great-grandson of Lawrence Mitchell, Esq., of Fingal, co. Meath, who was ninth in descent from Ambrose Mitchell, Esq., of Mount Mitchell, temp. Edward III.). Az. a chev. betw. three leopards’ faces or. Crest—A dexter arm embowed in armour, holding in the hand a sword all ppr. pommel and hilt or, pierced through a leopard’s face gold. Motto—Sola virtus nobilitat.
13) (granted by Betham, Deputy Ulster, to Piebre- point Oliver Mitchell, co. Cork, and the descendants of Hugh Henry Mitchell, his grandfather). Motto—Tout jour pret. Sa. on a fess betw. three mascles or, as msny trefoils vert. Crest—An angel in armour, holding in the dexter hand a spear ppr.
14) (granted by Betham, Ulster, to Fanny, only child of Thomas William O’Brien Mitchell, Esq., of Aghadda, co. Cork, and wife of Robert Plampin, Esq.). Ar. three trefoils slipped chevronways vert within two chevronels betw. as many mascles az.
15) (that Ilk, and Craigend, Scotland). Motto—Favente Deo supero. Sa. a fesse betw. three mascles or, in the middle chief a dagger erect, point upwards ppr. handle of the second, all within a bordure ar. charged with eight cinquefoils gu. Crest—A hand holding a writing pen ppr.
16) (Tillygreig, Aberdeen, 1672). Motto—Secura frugalitas. Sa. a fesse wavy betw. three mascles or.
17) (Landath, Scotland, 1672). Motto—Labor improbus omnia vincit. Sa. a fesse engr. betw. three mascles or.
18) (Wester New Birny, Scotland, 1672). Motto—Omnia superat diligentia. Sa. a fesse invecked betw. three mascles or.
19) (Thainston, co. Aberdeen; as borne by Duncan Forbes Mitchell, Esq., of Thainston, grandson of Duncan Forbes Mitchell, Esq., second son of Sir Arthur Forbes, fourth bart. of Craigievar). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Forbes, of Craigievar; 2nd and 3rd, sa. a fess.
20) (Berry and Westshore, Zetland, bart. 1724, extinct 1783). Motto—Sapiens qui assiduus. Sa. a fesse betw. three mascles or, a bordure chequy of the second and first. Crest—Three ears of barley conjoined in the stalk ppr.
21) (Alderston, co. Edinburgh, 1722). Motto—Cresco. Sa. a chev. betw. three mascles or. Crest—A stalk of wheat bladed and erected in pale ppr.
22) (Thainston, co. Aberdeen, 1766). Motto—Nulla pallesare culpa. Sa. a fess wavy betw. three muscles or. Crest—A phoenix in flames ppr.
23) (Admiral William Mitchell, 1814). Motto—Omnia superat virtus. Sa. a fess wavy erminois, in chief a naval crown or. betw. three mascles ar. and in base an anchor in pale of the third. Crest—Betw. two ears of wheat or, an arm erect, vested az. cuff or, the hand ppr. grasping an anchor in bend sinister or.
24) (Scott-Mitchell, New South Wales, 1860). Mottoes— Over the crest: Deo favente; below the shield: (Greek Word). Sa. on a bend berw. three mascles or, a dove with an olive branch in its beak ppr. betw. a mullet and a crescent az. Crest—A dexter hand erect, holding a garland of laurel ppr.
25) (Stow, co. Edinburgh, 1866). Motto—Deo favente. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, sa. on a fess betw. three mascles or, a star wavy az., for Mitchell; 2nd and 3rd, ar. a chev. wavy betw. three stars of six points wavy az., for Innes. Crest—A dexter hand holding a garland of laurel ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P233
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Falcon
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escallop
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P299
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P91
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164