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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Hallowes, co. Derby). Ar. an oak tree fructed ppr. Crest—Two arms embowed in armour ppr. holding a chaplet or.
2) (Alfreton, co. Derby; resident at Staden in Bakewell previous to the reign of Henry VIII., when Rowland Morewood m. a co-heir of Stafford, of Eyam. The last male heir, George Morewood, Esq., of Alfreton, d.s.p. in 1792; his widow, Helen, dau. of Richard Goodwin, of Ashbourne, in. Rev. Henry Case, Rector of Ladbrook, co. Warwick). Vert an oak tree ar. fructed or. Crest—A dexter and sinister arm armed ppr. supporting a chaplet of oak branches vert, acorned or.
3) (Alfreton; exemplified to Rev. Henry Case, Rector of Ladbrook, co. Warwick, upon his assuming, by royal licence, 1793, the additional name of Morewood). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, same Arms, for Morewood; 2nd and 3rd, or, on a bend invecked az. double cotised gu. three square buckles of the first, for Case. Crests—1st, Morewood: As the preceding; 2nd, Case: A cubit arm armed, in the hand ppr. a buglehorn sa. stringed betw. two oak branches ppr. fructed or.
4) (Alfreton; William Palmer, Esq., son and heir of the late Charles Palmer, Esq., of Ladbroke, co. Warwick, by Jane, his wife, dau. of Richard Goodwin, Esq., of Ashbourne, and sister of Helen, wife first of George Morewood, Esq., of Alfreton, assumed the additional name of Morewood). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, Morewood; 2nd and 3rd, ar. on two bars sa. three trefoils of the first, in chief a greyhound courant of the second, for Palmer. Crests—1st, Moorewood; 2nd, Palmer: A greyhound sejant sa. collared or.
5) (co. York; John Morewood, Esq.; Fun. Ent. Ulster's Office, 1660, of his dau. Ellenor Morewood, wife of James Stopford, Esq., of Saltersford, co. Chester, and New Hall, co. Meath, ancestor of the Earl of Courtown). Ar. three oak trees eradicated vert.

Origin, Meaning, Family History and Morewood Coat of Arms and Family Crest

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Morewood Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Morewood blazon are the oak tree, chaplet and arm in armour. The two main tinctures (colors) are argent and vert.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 1. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 2.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 3. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 4. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 5. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

Amongst the natural objects depicted on a coat of arms, trees feature frequently, either in whole or as individual branches and leaves. 6. Although sometimes described simply as a tree most often the specific species was named, and the oak tree or oak leaf is a typical example that frequently is depicted in arms, sometimes fructed with acorns of a different colour. 7 For good reason, Wade assigns the meaning of “antiquity and strength” to this symbol. 8

Laurel appears in several forms in heraldry, beginning with the whole bush. through branches, sprigs and leaves. Wade, the noted heraldic author, reckons that the leaves represent “tokens of peace and quietness”, whilst branches, especially in pairs are in memory of some great triumph. 9 The other major appearance of the laurel is in the form of the laurel wreath, also known as a chaplet. 10. This was worn as a token of victory by Roman emporers, and Wade futher suggests that a similar purpose is adopted in heraldic art.

The Arm appears frequently in the crest of a coat of arms, often armoured and described in some detail as to its appearance and attitude. 11 It can also appear on the shield itself as a charge. The arm itself is said to signify a “laboorious and industrious person” 12, whilst the arm in armour may denote “one fitted for performance of high enterprise” 13

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References

  • 1 Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
  • 2 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
  • 3 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
  • 4 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
  • 5 Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
  • 6 A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P94, 262, 407
  • 7 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Oak
  • 8 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P126
  • 9 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P125.
  • 10 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Laurel
  • 11 A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:arm
  • 12 The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P92
  • 13 A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P184