Mortlock Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Mortlock Family Coat of Arms

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Mortlock Coat of Arms Meaning

Mortlock Name Origin & History

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Mortlock Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Mortlock blazon are the lion rampant, fret, fleur-de-lis and lozenge. The two main tinctures (colors) are gules and or.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).3A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

The fret is a striking charge, often occupying the whole of the field and being two instersecting diagonal lines interlaced with the outline of a square. 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret It is believed to be derived from the image of a fishing net, which it does indeed resemble, and hence Wade believes that it should signify persuasion, although other writers regard it separately as the “the heraldic true lovers knot” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P118

The fleur-de-lys (“flower of the lily”) has a long and noble history and was a symbol associated with the royalty of France even before heraldry became widespread. 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3. The Lily flower is said to represent “Purity, or whiteness of soul”12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134 and sometimes associated with the Virgin Mary. The fleur-de-lys is also used as a small “badge”, known as a mark of cadency to show that the holder is the sixth son of the present holder of the arms 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Mortlock Name

Mortlock Origin:

England

Origins of Mortlock:

This unusual surname is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a habitational name from Mortlake in Surrey. It acquires from the Olde English pre 7th Century byname “Morta”, of uncertain etymology, but it may be from the fish-name “mort”, which means “young salmon”, originally given as a nickname, and the Olde English “lag”, which means wet pasture, or “lacu”, which means a stream. So, “stream frequented by young salmon.” The place name was first noted as “Mortelaga” and “Mortelage” in the Domesday Book of 1086, and as “Mortelak” in the Close Rolls of 1228. The surname advancement since 1273 contains the following as John Mortlake (London, 1565), and John Morelacke (London, 1581). Listed in the English Church Records are the weddings of Ambroseius Mortlock and Margareta Thurnall in January 1635, at Burwell, Cambridgeshire, and of Richard Mortlock and Hannah Gotto in October 1783, at St. Saviour’s, Southwark, Surrey. A Royal symbol was given to a Mortlock family in Cambridgeshire. The Slogan “Hic labor hoc opus,” transposes as, “This is the difficulty, this the task.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Mortlok, Martlock, Mortleck, Mortluck, Marteluck, Martelock, Martalock, Martolock, Mertelock, Martellock, Mortlake.

England:

The surname Mortlock first appeared in Cambridgeshire where they held a family seat as Kings of the Estate. The Saxon rule of English history declined after the Battle of Hastings in 1066. The language of the courts was French for the next three centuries, and the Norman atmosphere prevailed. But Saxon surnames remained, and the family name first mentioned in the year 1279 when Walter Mortelake held the estates.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Walter Mortlake, dated about 1086, in the “Hundred Rolls of Cambridgeshire,” It was during the time of King Edward I, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Mortlock had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

Australia:

Some of the people with the surname Mortlock who landed in Australia in the 19th century included William Ranson Mortlock at the age of 21, arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Irnaurn of Muscat” in the year 1843. John Mortlock arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Royal George” in the year 1848. Joseph Mortlock at the age of 24, arrived in South Australia in the year 1857 aboard the ship “Monsoon.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Mortllock: South Africa 1,498; England 1,473; Australia 674; United States 274; New Zealand 168; Canada 119; Wales 113; Scotland 79; Spain 10; China 3.

Notable People:

John Mortlock (1755–1816), was a British banker and political leader.

Stirling Mortlock (born 1977), is an Australian rugby player.

Bryce Mortlock (1921–2004), was an Australian designer.

David Favis-Mortlock (born 1953), is an English geomorphologist and singer.

The Mortlock family of Martindale Hall included William Ranson Mortlock (1821–1884), who was a South Australian businessman and political leader (father).

William Tennant Mortlock (1858–1913), was a South Australian businessman and political leader. He was the son of William Mortlock.

Mortlock Family Gift Ideas

Browse Mortlock family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Abington Hall, co. Cambridge; granted to Thomas Mortlock, Esq., High Sheriff co. Cambridge, 1840, any his brother, Sir John Cheetham Mortlock, Commissioner of Excise). Motto—Hie labor hoc opus. Gu. a lion ramp. or, a border indented of the last. Crest—A lion segreant or, resting the dexter paw on a cross pattée fitchée az.
2) (co. Norfolk). Erm. a fret az. on a chief engr. gu. three fleurs-de-lis or.
3) Ar. three lozenges gu. Crest—A lion’s head erased sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
3. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fret
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P118
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 3
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P134
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P489