Newbury Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Newbury Family Coat of Arms

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Newbury Coat of Arms Meaning

Newbury Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Newbery.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Newbury. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Newbury Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Newbury blazon are the lion and strawberry. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and gules .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 10Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 11A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Many items found in the natural world occur in coats of arms, including many plants that people of the middle ages would be familiar with. Several varities of bush and small plants frequently found in the hedgerows beside fields can be observed 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270, in addition to the famous thistle of Scotland 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P147. The strawberry is a an example of such a plant, instantly recognisable to those in the mediaeval period and still a proud symbol today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Newbury Name

Newbury Origin:

England

Origins of Newbury:

Listed in many spellings such as Newbery, Newbury, Newborough and Newburgh, this is a surname of Anglo-Saxon sources. It is geographical from any of the places called Newbury or Newborrow, from the Olde English pre 7th-century word “neowe” which means new, and the addition of “-burh,” which means fortress or town. As examples Newbury in Berkshire, noted as “Neuberie”, in the popular Domesday Book of 1086, Newburgh in the North Riding of Yorkshire and also in Lancashire, noted respectively as “Nou Burgo” in the Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire in 1199, and as “Neweburgh” in the Place Names list of Lancashire in 1431. While Newborough in Staffordshire, listed as “Neuboreg” in the Assize Court Rolls of that division in 1280. The surname first appears on record in the second part of the 13th Century, and one John de Newbury was listed in Somerset, in 1327. Other documentations containing that in January 1599 of Avelin Newbury and George Holliers who married at St. Margaret’s, Westminster, and that in February 1685, of Joseph Newberry of Exeter. He was on the list of put away rebels bound for shipping to the Barbados after the Monmouth Rebellion of that year

Variations:

More common variations are: Newburry, Newburey, Newbuary, Newbry, Nebury, Newbur, New Buary, Newbery, Newbrey, Nawbury.

England:

The surname Newbury first appeared in Berkshire, where the first one on record was Godwin de Neweberia recorded in the Pipe Rolls of 1190.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of Henry de Neubury, dated about 1273, in the “Hundred Rolls of Buckinghamshire.” It was during the time of King Edward 1st, who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Newbury had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Newbury landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 17th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Newbury who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Thomas Newbury, who landed in New England in 1634. Richard Newbury, who arrived in Weymouth, Massachusetts in 1645. Benjamin Newbury, who came to Connecticut in 1685. Walter Newbury, who arrived in Rhode Island in 1687.

The following century saw more Newbury surnames come. Some of the people with the name Newbury who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Leonard Newbury, who landed in New York in 1834.

Canada:

People with the surname Newbury who settled in Canada in the 18th century included Mr. Thomas Newbury U.E. who arrived at Port Roseway, [Shelbourne], Nova Scotia in October 1783 was traveler number 277 aboard the ship “HMS Clinton,” picked up in September 1783 at Staten Island, New York, USA.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Newbury who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Elizabeth Newbury arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship “Calabar.”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Newbury who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Theresa Newbury, Charles Newbury, Eliza Newbury, Frances Newbury and Maria Newbury, all arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Joseph Fletcher” in 1855.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Newbury: United States 2,808; England 2,732; Scotland 2,428; Australia 1,348; South Africa 1,169; Canada 888; New Zealand 478; Wales 102; United Arab Emirates 99; France 86.

Notable People:

A. C. Newbury (Alfred Charles Newbury, 1886–1948), was an Australian Congregationalist administrator.

Christopher Newbury (born 1956), is an English political leader.

Graham C. Newbury (1910–1986), was an American surgeon.

Newbury Academy is an alternative high school founded in 2001 at Dumont, New Jersey, named for Drs. Graham C. and Jane Cunningham Newbury.

Newbury Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) Sa. three pallets erm. on a canton ar. a demi lion az. Crest—A dexter arm ppr. vested az. cuffed or, holding a truncheon gu. tipped gold.
2) (London). Ar. three bars az. a chief gu. Crest—A Moor’s head in profile ppr.
3) (Reg. Ulster s Office). Ar. a chev. gu. betw. three bunches of strawberries slipped ppr.
4) (co. Berks). Sa. three palets erm. on a canton ar. a lion ramp. az. Crest—A demi eagle displ. or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
10. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
11. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P270
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P147