Newell Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Newell Family Coat of Arms

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Newell Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Newell blazon are the well, cinquefoil, chevron engrailed and hautboy. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, or and gules .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

Although we expect to find fierce creatures and fearsome weapons depicted in a coat of arms this is not always the case – sometimes simple household objects are used 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281. The well is a typical example of this. Sometimes these objects were chosen for the familiarity they would have for the obsever, helping them identify the owner, and sometimes they were used because of some association with the owner, or a similarity to the family name. 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100 The well is typically illustrated as we expect, with a low brick wall and sometimes with a bucket on a rope. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Well

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The cinquefoil is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It is shown as five-petalled flower, each petal quite rounded but with a distinct tip. It is sometimes pierced with a hole in the centre and usually appears on its own, without any leaves. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil It has no fixed colour but can appear in any of the available heraldic tinctures.

The chevron is one the major shapes used upon a shield, known as ordinaries, being in the form of an inverted ‘v’ shape 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron. It is a popular feature, visually very striking and hence developed to have various decorative edges applied to distinguish otherwise identical coats of arms. The edge pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Newell Name

Newell Origin:

England, Scotland

Origins of Name:

The surname Newell, which is also spelled Newhall and Newall, can be spelled three different ways, and has three potential meanings. It is possible that the surname Newell derived from living near or at a “new hall” or would also be used as calling someone who worked in one by that name. It could also be derived from the Old English words “neowe” which is defined as new, and “heall” which is defined as hall. However, there is also a possible third meaning, which is someone who lived near or in the “Newhall” township, which was located in both Cheshire and Yorkshire. Due to this, the prevalence of the Newell, Newhall, Newall name is more highly concentrated in Cheshire and Yorkshire, than in other areas.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Newuell, Noewell, Newelly, Newel, Newll, Nwell, Newall, Newill, Knewell, Newelle, Nowell, Nawell, Newhall, Newell, Newiell, Newwell, Neweall, Nnewell, Newello,

History:

England:

The surname of Newell was first recorded in the latter part of the twelfth century, and was also seen as part of the early census taken by the Kings of Scotland to assess taxation. However, an early spelling of Niewehal, would be recorded in 1195. The name Robert Stirling Niewehal was mentioned in the Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire, during the rulings of King Richard I, who was nicknamed “Richard the Lionheart.” These Pipe Rolls of Yorkshire spanned ten years, from 1189-1199. In 1379, Hugo de Neuhalle was mentioned in the “Poll Tax Returns of Yorkshire, while in 1383, John de Newhalle was named in the “Pardons Roll of Cambridge.” According to the record, the surname Newell, or any variation, did not appear in recorded history until one hundred and sixty-eight years later, when Susan Newell was christened in 1551, in the church of St. Margaret in Westminster. Seventy-nine years after that, in 1630, Richard Newell was named in the “Chester Wills”, and twenty-six years later Robert Newell was wedded to Ann Collier at St. Nicholan, Rochester in the December of 1656. It is important to note that when the English Poll Taxes were imposed, surnames became necessary for personal taxation. Due to the literacy, or lack thereof, the spellings of surnames changed based on the location, as well as the phonetics of the recorder. Many people with the surname Newell migrated to Australia, New Zealand, and Nova Scotia from England.

United States and Canada:

During The Great Migration, many people with the surname Newell arrived in the United States of America and a few migrated to Canada. Members of the Newell clan arrived in Salem, Massachusetts and New England in 1634, while many more came to Virginia, New England, and Pennsylvania in the nineteenth century. In Canada, Jas Newell arrived in Nova Scotia. In the nineteenth century, Margaret Newell, age 51, and Jonas Newell, age 40, arrived in America in 1821, while James C Newell landed in New York in 1832. Eight years later, Thomas Newell landed in Alleghany County, Pennsylvania in 1840, and ten years after that, in 1950, R A Newell arrived in San Francisco, California.

Newell Today:

United States 37,001

England 9,077

Canada 3,782

Australia 3,563

Jamaica 1,535

South Africa 986

Northern Ireland 799

New Zealand 601

Germany 572

Mexico 523

Notable People:

Arthur H. Newell, was a Delegate to New Hampshire State Constitutional Convention from Dunbarton in 1956, and was also a politician from America

Norman Dennis Newell (1909-2005) taught geology at Columbia University in America

David Newell (born in 1938) was an American actor, and portrayed the delivery man, Mr. McFeely, on Mister Roger’s Neighborhood

Robert “Doc” Newell (1807-1869) Oregon Country fur trapper, and politician in the United States

Miss Marjorie Anne Newell, was a twenty-three-year-old woman who escaped the sinking of the RMS Titanic via a lifeboat, and was a First Class Passenger from Lexington, Massachusetts

Miss Madeline Newell, was a thirty-one-year-old woman who escaped the sinking of the RMS Titanic via a lifeboat, and was a First Class Passenger from Lexington, Massachusetts, escaped on the same lifeboat as Miss Marjorie Anne Newell

Mr. Arthur Webster Newell (died in 1912) was a fifty-eight-year-old man from Lexington, Massachusetts who perished in the sinking of the RMS Titanic, who was also a First Class Passenger

William Wells Newell (1839-1907) was a teacher, minister, philosophy professor, and folklorist in America

Allen Newell (1972-1992) worked for the RAND Corporation as a researcher in computer science and cognitive psychology in America

Arthur S. Newell (born in 1850) was a politician and U.S. Consular Agent in Waterloo from the year 1886 to 1901

Newell Family Gift Ideas

Browse Newell family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Adwell. co. Oxford; granted 1755). Ar. on a cher, engr. az. betw. three wells ppr. as many cinquefoils of the field. Crest—An Italian greyhound ppr. collared, dovetailed or, charged on the shoulder with a cinquefoil ar.
2) (England). Same Arms. Crest—Out of a mural coronet az. a lion's head or.
3) Gu. two hautboys in saltire, the sinister surmounted of the dexter betw. four crosses crosslet, all or.
4) Ar. three bars gu. over all a bend engr. sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P281
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 100
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Well
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cinquefoil
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chevron