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Newman Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Newman Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Newman Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Newman. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Newman Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Newman blazon are the mullet, dolphin, griffin and chevron wavy. The three main tinctures (colors) are gules, or and azure .

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”1The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 2Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.3A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 10A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

In the days before television and the internet it was a rare heraldic artist that had ever seen a dolphin for real, so we should not be surprised that the heraldic representation is not instantly recognisable. Despite this, we should not forget that these artists considered the dolphin to be the king of fish, playing the same role as the lion in the animal kingdom. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin For reasons not immediately clear, Wade suggests that the dolphin was regarded as an “affectionate fish, fond of music”. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? As heraldry developed a whole menagerie of imagined creatures 14Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164 came into being, and their various representations became more or less standardised in form and appearance. The griffin is perhaps the most common of these creatures, being a chimera with the body of a lion and the head and wings of an eagle. 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin. It is most often in the pose known as rampant segreant, on its hind legs with claws and wings extended. Vinycomb has much to say on the subject of the griffin, perhaps summarised in his belief that it represents “strength and vigilance”.]16Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Newman Name

Newman Origin:

England, Germany

Origins of Name:

The surname of Newman was a combination of a Germanic and Anglo-Saxon surname with Pre 7th century origins. Originally, the surname of Newman was a pre-medieval nickname that was given to somebody who was new to a particular place or area. The original deviation of this surname was from the word “neowe” with the suffix “mann” which was translated to mean a friend or a foreman.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Newmann, Newmane, Newhman, Neuwman, Niewman, Newmaan, Newmana, Newuman, Neewman, New Man

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Newman was in the country of England in the year 1166. One person with this surname, who was named Stangrim Noueman was recorded in the Pipe Rolls of Norfolk. This document, the Pipe Rolls of Norfolk was ordered, decreed, and carried out during the reign of King Henry III, who was known as and commonly referred to as “The Builder of Churches” and ruled from the year 1154 to the year 1189. Other mentions of the surname of Newman can be found in church documents, such as in the case of John Henry Newman, who was created and named as a Cardinal of St. George in Velabro in the year of 1879. John Henry Newman resigned from his Angelical living and joined the Roman Catholic Church in the year 1845. Those who bear the surname of Newman can be found throughout the country of England. Those areas with higher concentrations of the surname of Newman are Essex, Yorkshire, Lancashire, Devon, Somerset, Dorset, and Wiltshire counties

Ireland

The surname Newman in Ireland is of English immigration. The majority in Ireland can be found in Cork, Meath, and Dublin. Richard Newman in 1686 came to own the Newberry estate in Mallow, Cork and the family would remain there for generations as local gentry.

Canada

Newmans in Canada first arrived in 1700 in Newfoundland where they had set up a trading post for fish. Later Newmans from Germany and Ireland would arrive. Even a variation of the name – Nyman – from Finland would arrive.

United States of America:

During the 17th Century, there was a large migration from European countries to the United States of America, which at that time was referred to as The Colonies, or the New World. These settlers were seeking out a better life for them and their families, and America promised freedom from religious persecution, a life without an overarching ruler, and better living conditions. This migration was referred to as The Great Migration, and is also referred to as The European Migration. The first settler with the surname of Newman was one person named Robert Newman, who landed in the state of Virginia in the year 1618. Closely following him was William Newman, who landed in the state of Virginia in the year 1622, and then Robert Newman, who landed in the state of Virginia in the year of 1623. In the year 1630, one person named George Newman who settled in the state of Maine, and one Francis Newman settled in the state of New Hampshire in the year 1634, and became the governor of the New Haven Colony in 1658, and served in this position for one year, before passing away in the year 1660. Within the United States of America, there are many people who bear the surname of Newman. The places with the highest concentrations of people who carry this surname and are recorded to bear it can be found in most parts of the United States of America, but can be found specifically in certain states within the entire expanse of the country. The states that have the highest concentration of those who bear the surname of Newman are as follows: New York, Virginia, Michigan, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and the state of California.

Newman Today:

United States 121,809

England 33,911

Australia 13,618

Canada 9,694

Ghana 8,867

South Africa 8,840

Nigeria 7,030

Sierra Leone 2,675

New Zealand 2,211

Jamaica 2,195

Notable People:

Jimmy Yvez “C.” Newman (1927-2014) who was a singer and a longtime star of the Grand Ole Opry, and was an American

Steve Newman (born in 1953) who was a soccer forward from America

James Hansen Newman (born in 1956) who was a former NASA Astronaut who has spent over 43 days in space

Donald J. Newman (1930-2007) who was an mathematician and professor from America

David Newman (1933-2009) who was a jazz saxophonist from America

Captain Beyrl R. Newman (1911-1998) who was an Army Officer who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor in the year 1944 and was from America

Walter Newman (1916-1993) who was a radio writer and screenwriter who was nominated three times for different Academy Awards and was from America

Robert Loftin Newman (1827-1912) who was a painter and stained-glass designer from America

Paul Leonard Newman (1925-2008) who was awarded an Academy Award, a Golden Globe, a Cannes Award an Emmy Award for his acting and directing, and was from America

Newman Family Gift Ideas

Browse Newman family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Berks). Sa. three mullets ar. Crest—A swallow volant ppr.
2) (Fifehead Magdale, co. Dorset, bart., extinct 1747; and Thornbury Park, co. Gloucester; Anne, dau. of Richard Newman, Esq., of Evercreech, m. Ashburnham Toll, Esq., of Graywell, co. Hants, and was grandmother of the Rev. Ashburnham Philip Toll, Prebendary of York). Motto—Lux mea Christua. Quarterly, sa. and ar. in the 1st and 4th quarters three mullets of the second, in the centre an inescutcheon gu. charged with a portcullis imperially crowned or, an augmentation granted by Charles II. to Colonel Newman, for his distinguished conduct at the battle of Worcester. Crest—A swallow rising ppr.
3) (St. Giles's, co. Middlesex; Osbaston Newman, aged 19 at Visit. Middlesex, 1663, only surviving son of Arthur Newman, gent., and grandson of Arthur Newman, gent., of Rickmansworth, co. Hertford). Az. a chev. wavy betw. three griffins segreant or. Crest—Out of a plume of feathers three az. two or and az. a griffin's head gold.
4) (Gunston, co. Stafford). Az. a fess wavy betw. six dolphins ar.
5) (Mamhead, co. Devon, bart.). Motto—Ubi amor ibi fides. Sa. three demi lions ramp. ar. langued gu. Crest—A lion ramp. ar.
6) (Ludgvan and Gluvias, co. Cornwall). Az. three demi lions ramp. ar. guttée de sang. Crest—A demi lion, as in the arms, betw. two wings expanded gu.
7) (Crediton, co. Devon). Sa. three demi lions ramp. erm.
8) (co. Devon). Ar. three eagles displ. gu. crowned or.
9) (Eastwood, co. Essex). Ar. a fesse dancettée gu. betw. three eagles displ. sa.
10) (co. Kent). Per pale gu. and vert, three eagles displ. or.
11) (London; granted 15 Feb. 1663-4). Or, a fesse dancettée betw. three hearts gu.
12) (London, 1610). Az. a chev. wavy betw. three griffins segreant or. Crest—On a plume of five feathers, three az. two or, a griffin's head of the last.
13) (London). Erm. on a chief sa. three crosses pattée or. Crest—On a mount vert a man, jacket az. breeches sa on the head ppr. a cap gu. on a ladder lighting a beacon all ppr.
14) (granted 1611). Or, a fesse indented gu. betw. three eagles displ. sa. Crest—A mermaid in the sea ppr. hair or.
15) Gu. a portcullis crowned or.
16) Erm. on a chief sa. three crosses pattée ar.
17) Or, three bars az. a canton erm.
18) (granted to William Ariah Newman, D.D.). Motto—Firmiter et fideliter. Per chev. ar. and az. in chief three crosses pattée of the second, and in base an heraldic antelope statant of the first. Crest—A lion ramp. ar. holding in the dexter paw an anchor or, and resting the sinister upon a shield az. charged with a star of eight points also ar.
19) (William Newman, Mayor of Dublin; Fun. Ent. Ulster's Ofiicc, 1597, of his son, William Newman). Ar. a lion ramp. gu. charged on the shoulder with three escallops or, two and one.
20) (Jacob Newman, Clerk In the Master of the Rolls Office, Ireland, Fun. Ent. 1651, of his dau. Elizabeth, wife of Sir James Ware, Auditor-General of Ireland). Az. three demi lions ramp. ar. guttée de sang. Crest—A demi lion ramp., as in the arms, betw. two wings erect sa.
21) (Drommaneene, co. Cork; granted by St. George, Ulster, 1674, to Richard Newman, a Justice of the Peace for that co., descended from Newman, of co. Somerset). Ar. a chev. betw. three demi lions pass. gu. a chief az. Crest—An eagle’s head erased az. charged on the neck with an escallop or.
22) (Reg. Ulster's Office). Sa. a chev. betw. three escallops ar.

One Comment

  1. Christine Ohrin October 20, 2016 at 11:08 pm - Reply

    What year/name did a Newman family member enter Australia.

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References   [ + ]

1. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
2. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
3. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
10. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
14. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
16. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150
17. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
18. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
19. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
20. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
21. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
22. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
23. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
25. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
26. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
27. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
28. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dolphin
29. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P83
30. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P164
31. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Griffin
32. Fictitious & Symbolic Creatures…in British Heraldry, J. Vinycomb, Chapman & Hall, London, 1906, P150