Noone Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Noone Family Coat of Arms

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Noone Coat of Arms Meaning

Noone Name Origin & History

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Noone Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Noone blazon are the lion’s gamb and cross engrailed. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, or and vert .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

The deep green colour that is so often observed in heraldry is more properly known as vert. According to Wade, the use of this colour signifies “Hope and Joy”, but may also represent, rather delightfully, “Loyalty in Love” 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It has other names also, the French call it sinople, perhaps after a town in Asia Minor from where the best green die materials could be found 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert. More fanciful heralds liked to associate it with the planet venus and the precious stone emerald 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. More strangely, there is some evidence that the term prasin was anciently used, being the Greek for the vegetable we call the Leek!

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 12Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 13A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.The variant lion’s gamb is another word for leg, and its significance remains the same as its parent animal

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. Since no two arms could be identical there arose many variants of the cross, typically involving patterning along the edges 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67. The pattern engrailed is a series of scalloped indentations with the points facing outwards – and should not be confused with invected, which has the points facing inwards! Wade believes that both of these indented forms represent “earth or land”, and one perhaps can indeed see the furrowed earth embodied in them.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Noone Name

Noone Origin:

England, Ireland

Origins of Noone:

Listed as Noon and Noone, this is an Anglo-Irish surname, but with different and specific origins. The first origin may be of old English and a pet name for a shining and happy person. It is from the word “non,” which means noon time, and so the golden time of day. The word was acquired from the Latin “nona” frequently mentioning the ninth hour, which was about three o’clock in the afternoon. The change in meaning from mid-afternoon to mid-day perhaps existed as a result of single meal times introduced later. The second origin of the surname could be Irish, and an advanced form of the Gaelic surname O’Nuadhain. It was from the Gaelic prefix O’, which means grandson or male offspring of, and the particular name “Nuadha.” The Sept claims offsprings from Niall of Nine Hostages in the 4th-century AD, and it was considered that they derive from division Sligo in the far west of the country. Originally, the oldest documentations appeared in that area in the poll of Ireland in 1659. Other old recordings contain those of Andrew Noone, given as being a student at Oxford University in the yeat 1575, and the naming of John, the son of John and Martha Noon, in March 1726, at St. Dunstan’s in the East, Stepney.

Variations:

More common variations are: Nooney, No One, Noonie, Knoone, Nouone, Noon, None, Nowne, Noney.

England:

The origins of the surname Noone was found in Norfolk where people held a family seat from early times. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Noone had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Noone settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the individuals with the name Noone who landed in the United States in the 17th century included Owen Noone settled in Maryland in 1672. Owen Noone landed in Maryland in 1672.

People with the surname Noone who settled in the United States in the 19th century included John Noone arrived in New York in 1816. Thomas Noone and his family landed in New York in 1864. Bridget Noone arrived in New York in 1864. Pat Noone arrived in New York in 1864. Thomas Noone, who landed in New York in 1864.

The following century saw much more Noone surnames arrive. Some of the population with the surname Noone who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Catherine Noone, who shifted to America from Irishtown, in 1904. Annie Noone, who settled in America from Donegal, Ireland, in 1905. Bridget Noone at the age of 21, who settled in America from Foxford, Ireland, in 1906. Delia Noone, who landed in America from Castlebar, Ireland, in 1907. Annie Noone, who landed in America from Castlebar, Ireland, in 1907

Australia:

People with the surname Noone who settled in Australia in the 19th century included John Noone arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Lysander” in 1839.

New-Zealand:

Some of the individuals with the surname Noone who settled in New Zealand in the 19th century included Henry V. Noone, Sarah A. Noone, Julia Noone and Selina Noone, all arrived in Auckland, New Zealand aboard the ship “Avon” in the same year 1860.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Noone: India 11,170; United States 3,416; Ireland 2,200; England 1,758; Australia 592; Germany 303; South Africa 237; New Zealand159; France 98; Canada 94.

Notable People:

Craig Noone (born 1987), is an English soccer midfielder.

Jimmie Noone (1895–1944), was an American jazz clarinetist.

Kathleen Noone (born 1945), is an American soap opera/television artist.

Nora Jane Noone (born 1984), is an Irish film and television actress.

Paul Noone (born 1981), is an English rugby league player.

Peter Noone (born 1947), is an English singer.

Noone Family Gift Ideas

Browse Noone family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Swaffham, co. Norfolk, and Tostock, co. Suffolk). Sa. a saltire betw. four lions’ gambs erased or. Crest—A bull’s head erased per fesse ar. and gu. attired of the last.
2) (co. Norfolk). Or, a cross engr. vert. Crest—An eagle displ. vert.
3) (Walton, co. Leicester; confirmed by Camden, Clarenceux, 1611; Francis Noone, Esq., of Walton, b. 1587, eldest son of Robert Noone, Esq., of Walton, who was great-grandson of John Noone, of same place. Visit. Leicester, 1619). Or, on a cross engr. vert a crescent of the field. Crest—An eagle displ. with two heads or. wings vert.
4) Paly of six ar. and sa.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Vert
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
12. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
13. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P67