Call Us Today! 1.555.555.555|info@yourdomain.com

Northey Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Northey Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Northey Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Northey. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

northey coat of arms

Northey Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Northey blazon are the panther, rose, pansey and lily. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, argent and or .

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 6A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

In the mediaeval period there was no real percieved difference between real and mythical animals, after all, much of the world remained unknown and who was to say what strange and magical creatures existed in distant lands? Nevertheless, real animals 8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191 are perhaps one of the most common sights on coats of arms, especially animals of European origin. The panther Is a typical example of these, although has the distinction of often being depicted with flames coming from its mouth and ears! 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Panther

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. Whilst the fleur-de-lys, the French “Flower of the Lily” may have become stylised almost beyond recognition 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P141, it still sometimes appears in a more pictorial form as the “lily of the garden”. The pansey is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect.

Northey Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Northey Name

Northey Origin:

England

Origins of Northey:

This name is of Anglo-Saxon origin and is a geographical surname from any one of the different places called “Northey,” which are a combination of the Olde English pre 7th Century word “north,” which means North and different additions. The places in Essex, Devonshire and Hertfordshire are named with “north” and “(ge)haeg”, which means an area, those in Sussex and Hampshire with “north and “e.g.,”, which means “island”, Northey in Whittlesey in Cambridgeshire is “north river” from “North” and “ea”, and Northey Wood in Cambridgeshire and Northey in Turvey, Bedfordshire are “the north bridge”, from “North” and “hoh”, which means hill, rock. In some situation, “Northey” may be a geographical name, expressing an apartment by or at the north hill or building of a place, as in Roger de la Northawe de Ledes (1439, Yorkshire). William Northey and Johanna South married in London in 1529.

Variations:

More common variations are: Northy, Northe, Knworthey, Northay, Niorthe, Norithy, Norothy, Northie, Northuy, Northwe.

England:

The surname Northey first appeared in Sussex Where they held a family seat from old times and their first records found on the census rolls derived by the old Kings of Britain to manage the rate of taxation of their services.

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Thomas de Northie, dated about 1200, in the “Pipe Rolls of Kent.” It was during the time of King John who was known to be the “Lackland,” dated 1199-1216. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Northey had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Northey landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 18th, 19th, and 20th. Some of the people with the name Northey who arrived in the United States in the 18th century included Gilbert Northey, who settled in Boston Massachusetts in 1762.

People with the surname Northey who landed in the United States in the 19th century included Richard Northey, who landed in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania in 1844. Elijah Northey, who arrived in Philadelphia in 1848. Josiah Northey and William Northey, both arrived in Allegany (Allegheny) Division, Pennsylvania in the same year 1868.

The following century saw more Northey surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Northey who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Emily Northey, who landed in America from Devon, in 1903. Henry Northey, who landed in America from Liverpool, in 1905. Charles Richard Northey, who shifted to America from Truro, England, in 1910. Charles Northey, who moved to the United States from Chacewater, England, in 1910. Albert Northey, who landed in America from Dalton in Furness, England, in 1911.

Canada:

People with the surname Northey who settled in Canada in the 20th century included John Pell Northey, aged 53, who settled in Toronto, Canada, in 1911. John P. Northey, Adelaide Northey and Florence Northey, all settled in Toronto, Canada, in the same year 1913.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Northey who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Elizabeth Northey and James Northey, both arrived in Adelaide, Australia aboard the ship “Cressy” in the same year 1847. Thomas Northey arrived in South Australia in 1855 aboard the ship “Nile.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Northey: Australia 1,344; United States 1,286; England 823; Canada 799; South Africa 164; Mexico 105; New Zealand 85; Wales 56; Ireland 38; United States Arab Emirates 38.

Notable People:

Alfred Northey (1838–1911), was an English priest and cricket player.

Andy Northey (born 1972), is an English rugby league and rugby union player.

Bill Northey (born 1959), is an Iowan political leader and a member of the Republican Party.

Northey Family Gift Ideas

Browse Northey family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More northey Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (co. Wilts; an ancient county family, of which was Sir Edward Northey, Knt., of Epsom, co. Surrey, Attorney-General to Queen Anne, whose son and heir, William Northey, Esq., of Ivey House, co. Wilts, Groom of the Chamber to Geerge III., a distinguished senator, m. Anne, dau. of the Right Hon. Edwabd Hopkins, Secretary of State for Ireland, and left three sons : William, of Box, co. Wilts, M.P., d. s. p.: Edwarbd, Canon of Windsor ; and General Richard Northey-Hopkins, of Oving House, co. Buckingham). Or, on a fess az. betw. three panthers statant ppr., semee of estoiles ar. two lilies of the last, with a rose in the centre gold, stem vert. Crest—A cockatrice, flames issuant from the mouth ppr.
2) (Epsom, co. Surrey). Motto—Steady. Or, on a fess az. betw. three panthers statant ppr. semée of estoiles ar. a pansey of the first betw. two lilies of the third. Crest—A cockatrice, flames issuing from the mouth ppr.
3) (Bocking, co. Essex). Or, on a fess az. betw. three panthers pass. ppr. a pansey of the first betw. two lilies ar.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
6. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Panther
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P141
14. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
18. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
19. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
20. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
21. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P191
22. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Panther
23. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
25. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
26. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P141