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Norwich Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Norwich Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Norwich Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Norwich. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Norwich Coat of Arms Meaning

The two main devices (symbols) in the Norwich blazon are the lion and eagle. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, gules and azure .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”4The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 11Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 12A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 15A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Norwich Name

Norwich Origin:

England

Origins of Norwich:

According to the early recordings of the spellings of the name, this interesting and unique name was listed as Noridge, Norridge, Norwich, Northridge, and possibly many more, this is an English surname. As to where it acquires from, or whether it derives from a type of places is unknown. The earliest record is considered being that of William de Northerugg in the division of Sussex in the Premium tax rolls of 1332. This documentation shows that a place called Northridge once located in that division, although if this was the situation, it absolutely has not been for many centuries. Several suggestions have been made that this surname could be a regional or dialect form of the city of Norwich. It is quite possible as the city was first noted in the year 930 A.D. as Nordwic. The Oxford Dictionary of English place names gives a version of North Town, although this first recording would clearly show that it means the farm to the north (of the main settlement). William Norwich noted St Andrews Norwich, in October 1560. Finally, for some name ancestors at least, the surname could acquire from a now “lost” old place once called Norridge in the church of Upton Scudamore in Wiltshire. This Norridge noted in the place names list for that division in the year 1203 as Northrigge and did clearly mean the north ridge.

Variations:

More common variations are: Norich, Nerwich, Knorich, Narwich, Norrich, Norch, Knoerich, Gnoerich, Noriuchi, Norricha.

England:

The surname Norwich first appeared in Norfolk where one of the first records of the name was Sir John de Norwich who had a “license to make a palace of his house in Mettingham, in which he established a chantry committed to God and the Virgin Mary. He also organized a college at Raveningham, in Norfolk, in 1343, for a master and eight chaplains. ”

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Norwich had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Norwich landed in the United States in two different centuries respectively in the 19th and 20th. Some of the people with the name Norwich who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included T. Norwich at the age of 27, who moved to America, in 1896

The following century saw more Norwich surnames arrive. Some of the people with the name Norwich who arrived in the United States in the 20th century included Julius Norwich at the age of 46, who emigrated to the United States from London, England, in 1907. Samuel Norwich at the age of 61, who landed in America, in 1922. Emma Norwich at the age of 48, who settled in America, in 1923.

Canada:

People with the surname Norwich who settled in Canada in the 20th century included Arthur Craven Norwich at the age of 23, who settled in Canada, in 1918.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Norwich: United States 332; England 220; Canada 68; Norway 39; Scotland 20; Australia 6; Russia 4; Israel 3; Cambodia 2; Wales 2.

Notable People:

Julian of Norwich (c. 8 November 1342 – c. 1416) was an English anchoress and an important Christian scholar. Her Visions of Divine Love, written around 1395, is the first book in the English language known to have been written by a woman. She was also known as a spiritual power within her community where she also gave services as a teacher and advisor.

John Julius Cooper, 2nd Viscount Norwich, CVO was born in September 1929. He is known as John Julius Norwich, is an English famous biographer, travel writer and television personality. He is the son of the Conservative leader and politician Duff Cooper and Lady Diana Manners, a renowned beauty, and socialite.

Norwich Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (cos. Essex, Norfolk, Northampton, and Suffolk; temp. Edward II.). By some families of the name the field of the arme has been borne variously, per pale az. and gu. and per pale aa. and purp. and the lion ar. Per pale gu. and az. a lion ramp. erm. Crest—On a mount vert a cock ar. combed, legged, and wattled gu.
2) (Baron Norwich, extinct 1374; Sir John de Norwich deacendedfrom Geoffrey de Norwich, temp. King John, was summoned to Parliament 1342). Per pale gu. and az. a lion ramp. erm.
3) (Brampton, co. Northants, bart., extinct 1742). Per pale gu. and az. a lion ramp. erm.
4) (co. Norfolk). Erm. a fesse engr. az. (another, gu.).
5) Sa. an eagle displ. or.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
11. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
12. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
15. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
19. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
20. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
21. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
22. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
23. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
25. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
26. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
27. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
28. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
29. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
30. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
31. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
32. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74