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Nottingham Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

/Nottingham Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Nottingham Family Coat of Arms

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Nottingham. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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nottingham coat of arms

Nottingham Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Nottingham blazon are the inescutcheon, annulet, lion and escallop. The three main tinctures (colors) are or, sable and gules .

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.1Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 2A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.3Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 4A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 5Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Gules, the heraldic colour red is very popular, sometimes said to represent “Military Fortitude and Magnanimity”7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. It is usually abbreviated as gu and in the days before colour printing was shown in a system known as hatching by vertical lines 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52. Although it may look like a French word it is normally pronounced with a hard “g” and may be derived either from the Latin gula (throat) or Arabic gule (rose).9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154

The escutcheon simply represents smaller shield shapes included within the shield, and its close relative, the inescutcheon is just a larger version occupying most of the field. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon There is no particular significance that can accorded to the escutcheon itself, but attention should be paid to the colour and devices that are borne upon it. The escutcheon may also be added to an existing coat of arms either as recognition of some additional honour (an escutcheon of augmentation”) or in the case where arms that are already quartered are to be combined an escutcheon with the new arms may be placed overall (an ”escutcheon of pretence”). 11Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 12A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the annulet is a good example, being a circular ring of any colour. They also appear interlaced or one within the other, both of which are very pleasing additions. Wade believes that these were one of the symbols of ancient pilgrims. 13The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19

The art of heraldry would be significantly poorer if we were without the lion in all its forms. Most general works on Heraldry devote at least one chapter solely to this magnificent creature and its multifarious depictions 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172 15Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63 16Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140. Some of the earliest known examples of heraldry, dating right back to the knighting of Geoffrey of Anjou in 1127, where he is shown with six such beasts upon his shield 17A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45 .The great authority on heraldic symbology, Wade, points out the high place that the lion holds in heraldry, “as the emblem of deathless courage” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60, a sentiment echoed equally today.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Nottingham Name

Nottingham Origin:

England

Origin of Nottingham:

Nottingham is a simple English surname which holds different spellings forms, some very difficult. It is the locational surname from the traditional city of Nottingham, the division town of Nottinghamshire, and popular for relation to the criminal Robin Hood and his assorted gang of thieves. The spelling forms of this locational name are remarkable and recognized to contain such forms as Nottingham, Nottingam, Nottyngam, Nottram and stranger ones like Nodrum, Notram, Knoweltone, and even Noteyoung. The regional name then appeared in the form of Snotengaham first listed in the year 868 a.d. in the Anglo-Saxon registers, and after two centuries it was listed in the Domesday Book of 1086 as Snotingeham. It is related to the old English pre 7th century word “ham”, which means a hamlet or home, plus “-ing” which means “the community of” and “Snot” a name which means “the house of the Snot People”. The element “s” was misplaced in the 11th century, at the same time surname itself was first listed in the middle of 13th Century, with previous examples of documentations consisting of Ralph de Nottingham of Oxfordshire, and Robert de Notingham of Nottinghamshire, both in the Hundred Rolls of 1273. Further examples derived at random consists of Annes Nattingham, named at St. Giles, Cripplegate, in June 1567, Sarah Knowetone named at St Katherines by the Tower in May 1610, both city of London, and Thomas Nottram of Stanhope in Durham, in September 1783.

Variations:

More common variations of this surname are: Knottingham, Notingham, Nottinghame, Nottingam, Nottinghm, Nottngham, Nettingham, Nottinhgam, Nuttingham, Nattingham.

England:

The surname Nottingham first originated in Nottingham where they held a family seat as kings of the castle. Later during the war of Hastings in 1066, William, Duke of Normandy, having reigned over King Harold, gave out land to several of his winning lords. It was not unusual to find a prince, or a landlord, with sixty or more Lordships which stretched all over the country. These he provided to his sons, brothers and further offspring of his family and they appeared as under-tenants. They accepted the Norman system which was recognized as under-tenants of his lands so as to recognize him as the head of the family. Later after several difficult battles between his lords, Duke William instructed to commence a poll of all of England in 1086, settling once and for all, who guarded which land. He named the poll the Domesday Book, expressing that those landowners listed would hold the land till the end of time.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of William de Nottingham, which was dated 1240, in the year of his election as fourth provincial administrator. It was during the time of King Henry III of England, dated 1216 – 1272.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Nottingham settled in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Nottingham who settled in the United States in the 17th century included John Nottingham came to Maryland in 1658. Rich Nottingham, who landed in Virginia in 1658. Thomas Nottingham and Thomas Nottingham arrived in Maryland in the same year 1670. Joseph Nottingham, who came to Virginia in the year 1673.

Some of the people with the name Nottingham who settled in the United States in the 18th century included James Nottingham who arrived in America in 1755. William Nottingham, who come to Virginia in 1768.

Some of the people with the name Nottingham who settled in the United States in the 19th century included William Nottingham, who landed in America in 1807. Eliza Nottingham, who settled in New York, NY in 1820. George Nottingham arrived in Philadelphia in 1821.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Nottingham: United States 4,921; England 1,543; Wales 90; Australia 136; Brazil 223; Canada 121; South Africa 183; Trinidad and Tobago 181; Scotland 33; New Zealand 133.

Notable People:

Charles Howard was the commander of the English group of ships against the Spanish Armada.

Edward Nottingham was a United States justice.

Sheriff of Nottingham was the imaginary criminal in the Robin Hood folk story.

Nottingham Family Gift Ideas

Browse Nottingham family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (England). Sa. an inescutcheon betw. three annulets or. Crest—A dexter hand ppr. holding an annulet or.
2) Same Arms, a border of the second.
3) Sa. an inescutcheon or, in chief three annulets and a border of the last.
4) Az. on a bend cotised ar. betw. six lions or, three mullets pierced gu
5) Gu. a lion ramp. ar.
6) Ar. a chev. engr. sa. guttée d'or (another, d’eau).
7) (Reg. Ulster's Office). Gu. on a bend or three escallops az.
8) (Reg. Ulster's Office). Gu. a fess betw. three escallops or.

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References   [ + ]

1. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
2. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
3. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
4. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
5. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon
11. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141
12. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
13. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
15. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
16. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
17. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60
19. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
20. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
21. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
22. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
23. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
24. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
25. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
26. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P52
27. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P154
28. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Escutcheon
29. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 126 & 141
30. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
31. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P19
32. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P172
33. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 63
34. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P140
35. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P45
36. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P60