Osmond Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Osmond Family Coat of Arms

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Osmond Coat of Arms Meaning

Osmond Name Origin & History

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Osmond Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Osmond blazon are the fesse dancettee, eagle and crescent. The three main tinctures (colors) are sable, ermine and azure .

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 5The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Azure is the heraldic colour blue, usually quite a deep, dark shade of the colour (there is a lighter blue that sometimes occurs, known as celestial azure). If colour printing is not available then it can be represented by closely spaced horizontal lines in a scheme known as “hatching” 7Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. The word is thought to originate from the Arabic lazura and it represents the colour of the eastern sky. It is also said to be the colour associated by the Catholic Church with the Virgin Mary and hence of particular significance 8The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150.

The fesse is a broad horizontal band across the centre of the shield, in very ancient times it was said to occupy one third of the area height of the shield 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117, however it soon became somewhat narrower. This created an opportunity to add decorative edging to the band, of many forms, and to very pleasing artisitic effect, at least close up – it must be admitted that at distance some of the forms are hard to distinguish! Dancettee (sometimes spelled dancetty or dancy) is a bold, zig-zag pattern, perhaps the most distinctive of the patterned edges. Purists might argue that the French variant denché Is not the same, being of larger size and with the points being 90º, but there is much variation in actual practice so the difference is perhaps not that meaningful.

Where the lion is undisputed king of the animals, the eagle undoubtedly plays the same role in the realm of the birds, its use in this form dating back to at least the Roman period 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle. They tend to be illustrated in quite some detail, especially in continental European arms, and have almost as wide variety of postures and accessories as the lion, well illustrated in the reference 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238 as well as being just the eagle’s head or eagle’s leg. The symbology of the eagle is deep and complex, Wade devotes several pages to the subject 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74, but suffice it say that it has long been associated with Empire and those held in high honour – any armiger would be pleased to have any form of Eagle upon their arms!

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 13A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 14A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 15The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Osmond Name

Osmond Origin:

England

Origins of Osmond:

This old name is of Anglo-Saxon and Old Scandinavian origin and formed from the Olde English pre 7th Century particular name “Osmund,” a combination of the components “os,” which means a god, with “mund,” which means security. Both this name and the free Old Norse special name “Asmundr” were in general use in England before the Norman Success of 1066; after that date, it was strengthened by the foundation of the Norman form, “Osmond.” The name was noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Osmund(us), Hosmundus” and “Hosmunt,” and although as a particular name, it became less common in the 13th Century, examples were listed in Cambridge in the 16th and 17th Centuries. The new surnames from this origin are Osmond, Osmon, Osmund, Oseman, Osman(t), Osment and Osmint, and old examples contain as Robert Osemund in the year 1221 in Norfolk. Richard Osemond (1297, Oxfordshire), and William Osman (1367, Essex). According to the documentation of the name from Parish records are those of the naming of Agnes, daughter of Alexander Oseman, in Tiverton, Devonshire, in August 1617, and the wedding of Richard Oseman and Mary Brush in April 1760, at St. Martin in the Fields, London.

Variations:

More common variations are: Osmondo, Osmonde, Osmondi, Ousmond, Osamond, Osmonad, Osomond, Ossmond, Oesmond, Esmond.

England:

The surname Osmond first appeared in Dorset at Melbury Osmond, a hamlet and local church in the union of Beaminster, Hundred of Yetminster that records back to 1283 when it first noted as Melebur Osmund. “Melbury” roughly means multi-coloured hidden place” from the Old English “maele” and burh.”

The very first recorded spelling of the family was shown to be that of Roger Hosemund, dated about 1199, in the “Feet of Fines of Northumberland.” It was during the time of King Richard I, who was known to be the “Richard the Lionheart,” dated 1189-1199. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England. Surnames all over the country began to develop, with unique and shocking spelling variations of the original one.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Osmond had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Osmond landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Osmond who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Gillian Osmond, who came to Maryland in 1670.

People with the surname Osmond who landed in the United States in the 18th century included John Osmond, who settled in Maryland in 1749. Lewis Osmond who settled in Philadelphia in 1793.

The following century saw more Osmond surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Osmond who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Herman Aarag Osmond, who landed in Ohio in 1836. Edmund Osmond, who was living in Ohio in 1855. William Osmond, who arrived in Arkansas in 1887.

Canada:

People with the surname Osmond who settled in Canada in the 18th century included David Osmond and David Osmond,both came to Nova Scotia in the same year 1793.

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Osmond who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Robert Osmond came to Sydney aboard the ship “Madawaska” in 1849. John Osmond arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship “William Stuart.” Isabella Osmond arrived in South Australia in 1858 aboard the ship “Storm Cloud.”

Here is the population distribution of the last name Osmond: Canada 3,528; England 2,103; United States 1,655; Australia 1,248; South Africa 931; France 502; Indonesia 333; Philippines 322; Kenya 314; Wales 305.

Notable People:

Andrew Osmond is a British writer.

Cliff Osmond was an American actor and composer.

Douglas Osmond was a British Chief First officer.

Floris Osmond was a French engineer.

Frank Osmond was a Welsh rugby union and rugby league football player.

Humphry Osmond is a famous British psychiatrist.

JoAnn D. Osmond was a Republican member of the Illinois House of Representatives.

John Osmond was a manager of the Institute of Welsh Affairs.

Ken Osmond is an American actor.

Osmond Family Gift Ideas

Browse Osmond family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Coventry, and Barkeswell, co. Warwick). Or, on a pile az. an eagle displ. in chief of the field a fesse dancettée erm. Crest—Out of a mount vert a perch sa. thereon an eagl. displ. erm.
2) (Exeter, co. Devon). Sa. a fess dancettée erm. betw. two eagles displ. ar. a crescent for diff. Crest—An eagle or.
3) (Thorpe). Per pale az. and gu. three crescents ar.
4) (Stagmill, co. Devon; Henry Osmond, grandson of Thomas Osmond, of Stagmill, left two daus. and coheirs: Anne, m. John Foxwell, of Exeter, and Hester, m. John Foxwell, of Combralye. Visit. Devon, 1620). Sa. a fess dancettée erm. in chief an eagle displ. ar.
5) (Exeter, co. Devon; Christopher Osmond, aged 39, Visit. 1620, grandson of Michael Osmond, the second son of Thomas Osmond, of Stagmill). Same Arms, a crescent for diff.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
5. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
7. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
8. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P150
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P117
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Eagle
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P235-238
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P72-74
13. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
14. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
15. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106