Palmer Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Palmer Family Coat of Arms

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Palmer Coat of Arms Meaning

Palmer Name Origin & History

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Palmer Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Palmer blazon are the trefoil, greyhound, crescent and fleur-de-lis. The four main tinctures (colors) are sable, or, argent and azure.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 11A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The trefoil may originally been a representation of a specific plant (perhaps shamrock) but it has been used as a symbol almost since the beginning of heraldry and over time has adopted a stylised aspect. 12A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil. Guillim believes that it signifies “perpetuity…the just man shall never wither”. 13A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109

Unlike many of the creatures to be found in heraldry, the Greyhound is shown in a very natural aspect and lifelike poses. 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204 It is probably the most common member of the dog family to be found in arms 15A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog, and Wade suggests that we see in its appearance the suggestion of“courage, vigilance and loyal fidelity”. 16The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 17A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 18A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 19The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Palmer Name

Palmer Origin:

England, France

Origins of Palmer:

The surname of Palmer is said to have been used as a nickname in medieval times. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. In the case of the surname of Palmer, the nickname is used for someone who has completed a holy mission, or a crusade. The surname of Palmer derives from the Old French words of “palmer” or “paumier” which can both be translated to mean “pilgrimage” or “crusades” which were made to the Holy Land. In this instance, many of these palmers were pilgrims who wore suits of armor and carried deadly weapons. The nickname of Palmer comes into play because in order to prove that they had completed the journey to the Holy Land, these pilgrims were said to have brought back a palm branch, thus, they were called palmers. Because of this, the surname of Palmer was said to be one of the earliest surnames that were created.

Variations:

More common variations are: Palimer, Palmear, Pallmer, Pealmer, Palmero, Palmeri, Palmera, Palomer, Palmere, Palmaer

History:

England:

One of the earliest recordings of the surname of Palmer can be found within the country of England. One person by the name of Wiger le Palmer was named in the Pipe Rolls of Lincolnshire in the year of 1191, while Richard le Paumere was mentioned as living in the county of Middlesex during the year of 1198. It is important to note that surnames were created in order to fulfill the Poll Taxes of the country, where surnames became required in order to differentiate one person from another, on record. Other mentions of the surname of Palmer within the country of England include one Ricardus Palmer, who was recorded in the Poll Tax Rolls of Yorkshire in the year of 1379, and one Joseph Pymer was mentioned as living in the city of London in the year of 1665, which was at the height of the Black Death in England. Those who bear the surname of Palmer within the country of England can be found in the southwestern region of the country. The county of Yorkshire has the largest population of people who bear the surname of Palmer, and a large concentration of those who are known by the surname of Palmer can also be found in the areas in and around the city of London.

Scotland:

Within the country of Scotland, there is a sizeable population of people who carry the surname of Palmer. The eastern and central regions of the country of Scotland have a large population of those who are known by the surname of Palmer, as well as within the county of Lanarkshire.

United States of America:

Those who are known by the surname of Palmer within the United States of America can be found within the states of Pennsylvania and in New York.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Palmer: United States 172,300; England 48,290; Australia 17,599; Canada 14, 075; South Africa 13,844; Jamaica 11,779; Nigeria 11,004; Sierra Leone 9,027; New Zealand 3,680; Mexico 2,958

Notable People:

Gregg Palmer (1927-2015) who was born Palmer Edvind Lee and who was an Actor from America and was best known for his changing roles on twenty episode of the show Gunsmoke on CBS

Major-General Williston Birkhimer Palmer who was a United States Army Vice Chief of Staff from the year 1955 to the year 1957

Lieutenant-General Charles Day Palmer(1902-1999) who was a Deputy Commander in Chief from America for the European Command from the year 1959 to the year 1962

Michael Palmer who was born in the year 1945 and is an Orchestral Conductor from America

Earl Cyril Palmer (1924-2008) who was a drummer from America and an inductee into the Rock an Roll Hall of Fame

General Bruce Palmer Jr. (1913-2000) who was an Americana who served as the acting Chief of Staff for the United States Army in the year 1972

Vera Jayne Palmer (1933-1967) whose birth name was Jayne Mansfield and who was an Actress from America and one of the leading sex symbols with blond hair in the 1950s

Palmer Family Gift Ideas

Browse Palmer family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Carlton, co. Northampton, bart.). (Withcote Hall, co. Leicester). Motto—Par sit fortuna labori. Sa. a chev. or, betw. three crescents ar. Crest—A wyvern or, armed and langued gu.
2) (Marston, co. Stafford; descended from Palmer, co. York; John Palmer, Esq., living 1666, had two sons, 1) Robert, his heir, whose representative, William Palmer, assumed the surname of Morewood (see Morewood); 2) William, whose great grandson, Archdale Palmer, had, with other issue, two sons, 1) Henry, whose dau. and eventual heir, Katherine Susan, in. 1766, Sir Charles Grave Hudson, first bart. of Wanllp, whose son, Sir Charles Thomas Hudson, second bart., assumed the surname of Palmer, by royal licence, 1813; 2) Thomas, father of William Palmer, Esq., of Nazing Park). Motto—Palma virtute. (Nazing Park, co. Essex; William Palmer, Esq., of Nazing Park, had, with other issue, 1) George, M.P. co. Essex, his successor; 2) Rev. William, B.D., Rector of Mixbury and Finmore, co. Oxford, whose second Son, Sir Roundell Palmer, Lord High Chancellor of England, was created, 1872, Lord Selborne). Ar. on two bars sa. three trefoils slipped of the first, in chief a greyhound courant of the first, collared or. Crest—A greyhound sejant sa.
3) (Baron Selborne). Motto—Palma virtuti. Ar. on two bars sa. three trefoils slipped of the first, in chief a greyhound courant of the second, collared or. Crest—A greyhound sejant sa. collared or, and charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped ar. Supporters—On either side a greyhound sa. collared and charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped ar.
4) (Wanlip, co. Leicester, bart.; Sir Charles Grave Hudson assumed, 1813, by royal licence, the surname and arms of Palmer). Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. two bars sa. charged with three trefoils slipped of the field, in chief a greyhound courant of the second, collared or; 2nd and 3rd, per chev. embattled erm. und az. three martlets counterchanged. Crest—On a mount vert a greyhound sejant sa. gorged with a collar or, rimmed gu. and charged on tho shoulder with a trefoil slipped vert.
5) (King’s Messenger, temp. Queen Anne. The coheiresses, Jane, m. Thomas Drury, Esq., and Dorothy, m. Thomas Kirkland, M.D., of Ashby de la Zouch, co. Leicester). Ar. on a bend sa. betw. two ogresses three trefoils slipped of the field. Crest—A cubit arm in armour, grasping a trefoil slipped vert.
6) (confirmed to Emmanuel Palmer, captain of horse in Col. Chudleigh Coote's regiment). Chequy ar. and az. on a chief gu. a ducal crown or. Crest—A lion pass. sa. armed and langued, holding in his dexter paw a dagger gu.
7) (Wingham, co. Kent, and Dorney Court, co. Buckingham, bart., extinct). Motto—Palma virtuti. Or, two bare gu. each charged with three trefoils ar. in chief a greyhound courant sa. Crest—A demi panther ramp, issuing flames out, of its mouth and ears, holding in the paws a holly branch, with leaves and berries all ppr.
8) (Hill, co. Bedford). Ar. two bars gu. on each three escallops or. Crest—A greyhound courant sa.
9) (Walden Street, co. Bedford, and Ladbrooke, co. Warwick). Ar. two bars sa. charged with three trefoils slipped of the field, in chief a greyhound courant of the second.
10) (Cheam Park, co. Surrey). Same Arms. Crest—A greyhound sejant sa. collared or, charged on the shoulder with a trefoil slipped ar.
11) (Great Yarmouth and Loddon, co. Norfolk; descended from William Palmer, 6. 1672). Motto—Palma virtuti. Or, two bars gu. each charged with three trefoils of the field, in chief a lion pass. ppr. Crest—A demi panther ramp. guard. issuant flames from his mouth and ears all ppr. holding a branch vert fructed gu.
12) (co. Bedford). Ar. two bars gu. on each three cinquefoils or. Crest—A greyhound courant sa.
13) (Wadesden, co. Buckingham, and Stockdale, co. Northampton; granted 22 Elizabeth). Az. a chev. engr. betw. three crescents ar. Crest—A cubit arm erect in mail ppr. holding a halbert sa. headed ar. Another Crest—A griffin's head ar. issuing out of rays ppr.
14) (Dorrington and Lymington, co. Gloucester, and. co. Warwick). Ar. on a chief sa. three cinquefoils of the field.
15) (Linche, co. Hertford). (Upton Snodsbury, co. Worcester; Edward Palmer, of that place, was High Sheriff 6 Queen Anne). Az. in chief a fleur-de-lis or, in base two trefoils slipped ar. a border engr. of the second. Crest—A wivern's head or, collared gu. wings expanded vert, fretty and semée of trefoils slipped ar.
16) (Hartlip, co. Kent; granted 19 Queen Elizabeth). Sa. a fess betw. three lions ramp. or. Crest—An ostrich volant ar.
17) (Howlets, co. Kent, 1686). (Dublin; confirmed by Carney, Ulster, 1683, as the arms of Elinor, wife of Asel Ram, Esq., of Ramsfort, co. Wexford, Alderman of Dublin, and daughter of Stephens Palmer, of Dublin). Ar. a chev. betw. three palmers’ scrips sa. the tassels und buckles or.
18) (Wood Court, co. Somerset). Same Arms. Crest—A hand grasping a palmer's staff. Motto—Palma virtuti.
19) (co. Kent). Barry of ten ar. and az. a griffin segreant or.
20) (granted to Charles Mark Palmer, Esq., of Grinkle Park, Easington, co. York). (Charles Mark Palmer, Esq., of Grinkle Park, co. York, M.P.). Motto—Par sit fortuna labori. Sa. on a chev. bstw. three crescents in chief and a lion pass. in base ar. two tilting spears chevronwise ppr. Crest—In front of a tilting spear erect ppr. a wyvern or, resting ths dexter foot on a crescent ar.
21) (Bosworth and Duddington, co. Leicester, and Kentish Town, co. Middlesex). Az. three fleuri-de-lis ar. a border engr. or.
22) (co. Leicester). Az. a fleur-de-lis erm.
23) (co. Leicester). Ar. on a bend sa. five bezants.
24) (Winthorp, co. Lincoln). Ar. three palmers' staves sa. the heads, ends, and rests or. Crest—A cubit arm erect, habited az. cuffed ar. grasping in the hand ppr. a palmer's staff.
25) (London, 1634). Ar. a lion ramp. betw. three palmers' staves sa. heada, ends, and rests or. Crest—A lion ramp. or, grasping a palmer's staff, as in the arms.
26) (Stepney, co. Middlesex, co. Northampton, and Kingaton-upon-Hull; confirmed 3 May, 1670). Or, on a chev. gu. five acorns of the field.
27) (Stokedale, co. Northampton). Sa. a chev. engr. betw. three crescents ar. Crest—A cubit arm erect in coat of mail ppr. holding in the hand of the last a halbert sa. headed ar.
28) (co. Sussex). Or, two bars gu. each charged with three trefoils slipped ar. in chief a greyhound courant sa. Crest—A demi panther ramp. guard. issuing flames from his ears and mouth ppr. holding a branch vert, fructed
29) (Parham, co. Sussex, and Fairfield, co. Somerset). Same Arms. Crest—A demi panther guard, ar. spotted gu. vert, or, and az. alternately, flames issuant from the mouth and ears, holding a palm branch ppr. Motto—Palma virtuti.
30) (Barton, co. Warwick, and co. York). Chequy ar. and az. a chief gu. (another, chequy or and az.). Crest—A griffin sejant.
31) (co. Warwick). Gu. five cinquefoils (another, quatrefoils) in saltire ar.
32) Chequy ar. and az. a chief gu. Crest—Out of a ducal coronet or, an elephant’s head sa.
33) (Holme Park, co. Berks). Chequy or and aa. on a chief gu. two mullets of the first. Crest—A talbot sejant erminois.
34) Ar. three palmers’ staves sa. heads, rests, and ends or, on a chief of the second as many escallops of the first. Crest—An escallop ar. betw. two laurel branches vert.
35) Az. a fleur-de lis in chief and two trefoils slipped in fess ar. a border engr. or. Crest—A dragon’s head couped or, collared and winged vert, on the collar three plates, the breast guttee de poix, the wings fretty ar. betw. the fret trefoils of the last.
36) Sa. three fleurs-de-lis betw. seven crosslets ar. a canton erm.
37) (Earl of Castlemaine, a branch of Palmer, of Wingham, extinct 1705). Crest—Palma virtuti. Or, two bars gu. each charged with three trefoils ar. in chief a greyhound courant sa. Crest—Same as Palmer, of Wingham. Supporters—Two lions guard. ar.
38) (Rahan House, King's co.). Motto—Honor virtutis praemium. Az. a chev. or, betw. three palmers’ staves and scrips sa. Crest—An arm in armour embowed ppr. garnished or, the hand grasping a spear also ppr.
39) (Castle Lacken, co. Mayo, bart.). Motto—Sic bene merenti palma. Quarterly, 1st and 4th, ar. a chev. vert betw. three palmers’ staves and scrips sa. garnished gu.; 2nd and 3rd, chequy ar. and az. on a chief gu. three annulets or. Crests—1st: An arm embowed vested az. cuffed or, grasping a tilting-spear ppr.: 2nd: A griffin sejant ar. wings addorsed gu. charged with three annulets of the second beaked and membered or.
40) (Fun. Ent. Ulster’s Office, 1621, Peter Palmer, one of the Justices of the Common Pleas in Ireland). Sa. a chev. betw. three crescents ar.
41) (granted by Betham, Ulster, to William Palmer, Esq., of Hyderabad). Motto—Deeds not words. Az. on a fess or, betw. in chief a greyhound courant, and in base a pelican in her piety ar., two trefoils slipped vert. Crest—An eagle volant rising from a mount with a palm branch in his beak, all ppr., motto over, “ lt shall flourish.”

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
11. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
12. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Trefoil
13. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P109
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P204
15. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Dog
16. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P69
17. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
18. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
19. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106