Parkhurst Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Parkhurst Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Parkhurst Coat of Arms Meaning

Parkhurst Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Parkhurst. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

parkhurst coat of arms

Parkhurst Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Parkhurst blazon are the buck, cross and crescent. The three main tinctures (colors) are ermine, argent and gules .

Ermine is a very ancient pattern, and distinctive to observe. It was borne alone by John de Monfort, the Earl of Richmond and Duke of Brittany in the late 14th century 1A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69 It has a long association with royalty and the nobility in general and hence represents “Dignity” wherever it is found 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39. The ermine pattern is white with, typically, a three dots and a dart grouping representing the tail of the furred creature.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28. The ermine spot is sometimes found alone as a special charge on the shield.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”6The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.8A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. 9Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits! 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

No other symbol appearing in heraldry is subject to as much variation as the cross 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47. Mediaeval Europe was a deeply religious and Christian and many of the nobility wanted to show their devotion by adopting the symbol of the cross as part of the arms. In its basic form, the cross is created from two broad bands of colour at right angles covering the whole extent of the shield. It has been subject to all manner of embellishment, and the interested reader is referred to the references, especially Parker’s Heraldic dictionary for many examples of these. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross 14A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P106 15A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P160-173 Suffice it to say that any armiger would be proud to have such an important device as part of their arms.

For easy recognition of the items on a coat of arms, and hence the quick identification of the owner, bold simple shapes are best. Hence, simple geometric shapes are often used for this purpose 16A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146xz`, and the crescent Is a typical example of this, and can appear in any of the main heraldic tinctures. Some common is this device that there are special names for its appearance in various orientations – whilst it lies normally with points upward, the decrescent points to the sinister side, and the increscent to the dexter 17A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon. The allusion, obviously is to the shape of the moon in the sky (indeed, the French have a version “figuré” which includes a face!) and has been said to signify both “honour by the sovereign” and “hope of greater glory” 18The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106.

Parkhurst Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Parkhurst Name

The name Parkhurst is part of the old legacy of the Anglo-Saxon tribes of Britain.  It is a product of when the family resided in the region of Parkhurst or wood in the park.  Parkhurst is a geographic surname, which given to a person who resided near a physical feature such as a hill, stream, church, or type of tree.  Habitation names form the other broad category of surnames that acquired from place-names. More common variations are: Parkhursat, Parkhuirst, Parkhurest, Wparkhurst, Parkheurst, Parckhurst, Parkhuyrst, Parkhurstw, Parkurst, Parkhrst.

The surname Parkhurst first appeared in Herefordshire where Sir Osbern Pentecost (died 1054), a Norman knight who followed Edward the Confessor to England built the castle at Ewyas, one of the first Motte and Bailey structures in England.  He like many other Normans transported from England, so he secured safe passage to Scotland in 1052 AD but later killed at the Battle of Dunsinane. Some of the people with the name Parkhurst who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included George Parkhurst, who settled in New England in 1630.  Anthony Parkhurst, who settled in Virginia in 1635.  Antho Parkhurst, who landed in Virginia in 1642.  George Parkhurst, who arrived in Watertown, Massachusetts in 1643. People with the surname Parkhurst who landed in the United States in the 18th century included John Parkhurst, who settled in Maryland in 1774.

Parkhurst Family Gift Ideas

Browse Parkhurst family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More parkhurst Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (London). (Ripple, co. Worcester; Fleetwood Parkhurst, of that place, was High Sheriff co. Worcester in 1792). Ar. a cross erm. betw. four bucks trippant ppr. Creat—Out of a pallisado coronet or, a buck’s head erased ar. attired of the first.
2) Same Arms. Crest—A griffin ramp, per fess or and gu.
3) (Lord Mayor of London, 1635). (Hall, co. Norfolk; granted 2 Elizabeth). Same Arms, on a chief gu. three crescents or.
4) (Guildford, co. Surrey). Same Arms. Crest—A demi griffin, wings endorsed sa. holding in the dexter paw a cutlass ar. hilt and pommel or.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P69
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P39
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 28
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
8. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
9. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 47
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Cross
14. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P106
15. A Treatise on Heraldry, J. Woodward, W & A.K Johnston, Edinburgh & London, 1896, P160-173
16. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P146
17. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Moon
18. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P106