Pickett Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Pickett Family Coat of Arms

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Pickett Coat of Arms Meaning

Pickett Name Origin & History

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Pickett Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Pickett blazon are the pickaxe, mullet, martlet and bend engrailed. The two main tinctures (colors) are sable and argent.

Sable, the deep black so often found in Heraldry is believed to named from an animal of the marten family know in the middle ages as a Sabellinœ and noted for its very black fur 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable. In engravings, when colors cannot be shown it is represented as closely spaced horizontal and vertical lines, and appropriately is thus the darkest form of hatching, as this method is known 2Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26. Although it may seem a sombre tone, and does indeed sometimes denote grief, it is more commonly said to represent Constancy 3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 5A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The pickaxe is not a weapon of war but a tool of the builder and its appearance in a coat of arms is more likely to denote the profession of the holder or be some play on words on the family name. 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Axe it is shown conventionally as a wooden handle with a long, curved metal spike, very similar to its appearance today. 7A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P268

The heraldic mullet, not to be confused with the fish of that name, is shown as a regular, five pointed star. This was originally, not an astronomical object, but represented the spur on a horseman’s boot, especially when peirced, with a small circular hole in the centre it represents a type of spur known as a “rowel” 8Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97. A clear example can be found in the arms of Harpendene, argent, a mullet pierced gules. The ancient writer Guillim associated such spurs in gold as belonging to the Knight, and the silver to their esquires 9A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107. In later years, Wade linked this five pointed star with the true celestial object, the estoile and termed it a “falling star”, symbolising a “divine quality bestowed from above” 10The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Pickett Name

Pickett Origin:

France, England

Origins of Pickett:

The surname of Pickett can find it’s origins in the country of England. The surname of Pickett was introduced to the country of England following the Norman Invasion of 1066. This surname finds its roots in the Germanic word of “pic” which can be translated to mean “sharp,” or “pointed.” This was a common element that was found in surnames that were topographical for a residence on or near a pointed hill. Thus, one possible derivation of the surname of Pickett is that it was a topographical surname. This means that this surname was given to someone who lived on or near a man-made or natural structure. This structure would have been a notable landmark or area within a town or village, thus making it distinguishable to those who hailed from this area. Another possible origin of the surname of Pickett is that it was a nickname of a tall, thin, person. It is a common element of surnames throughout Europe that many of them originally derived from nicknames, as it was a very common practice in medieval times. In the beginning, nicknames were applied to people who had distinguishing characteristics, such as moral or mental peculiarities, a similar appearance to a bird or animal, a similar disposition to a bird or animal, occupation of an individual, their habits, or their manner of dress. The final meaning of the surname of Pickett is that it was given to people who commonly used sharp or pointed objects, such as tools or weapon.

Variations:

More common variations are: Piggot, Pickette, Picketti, Paickett, Pickwett, Pieckett, Poickett, Picket, Pikett

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Pickett was found within the country of England. One person by the name of Roger Picot was mentioned in the document known as the Doomsday Book of Cheshire, and was dated the year of 1086. It is important to remember that the Doomsday Books of 1086 were meant to encompass the “Great Survey” of England. This document, the Doomsday Book of Cheshire, was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King William I of England, who was known throughout the ages as on “The Conqueror.” King William I of England ruled from the year of 1066 to the year of 1087. Other mentions of the surname of Pickett in the country of England include one Wiliam Piket, who was found to reside in the county of Berkshire in the year year of 1177, one Waubert Pyket, who was recorded as dwelling in the city of London in the year of 1277, and one Peter Pygot, who was known to live in the area of Cambridgeshire in the year of 1285. Those who bear the surname of Pickett in the country of England can be found in Cheshire, Yorkshire, Lancashire, and the areas in and around the city of London.

Scotland:

Those who bear the surname of Pickett in the country of Scotland can be found in the areas of Ayrshire, Renfrewshire, Lanarkshire, Midlothian, and in Perthshire.

United States of America:

In the United States, those who are called Pickett live in Maryland, Virginia, Massachusetts, New York, North Carolina, Kentucky, Georgia, South Carolina and Alabama.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Pickett: United States 35,280; England 3,909; Australia 1,920; Canada 1,826; New Zealand 433; Wales 327; South Africa 292; Mexico 288; Philippines 258; Scotland 197

Notable People:

Wilson Pickett (1941-2006) who was a singer and songwriter from America who specialized in the genres of Rhythm and Blues, Rock and Roll, and soul

Willie “Bill” M. Pickett (1870-1932) who was a rodeo performer and cowboy from America

Lucy Weston Pickett (1904-1997) who was a chemist and a zoologist from America

David Pickett (1874-1950) who was an American who played baseball for Major League Baseball in the position of outfielder

Cecil Lee “Rickey” Pickett who was born in 1970 and is a baseball player from America who plays for Major League Baseball as a left handed pitcher

Charles Albert Pickett (1883-1969) who was an American who played baseball for Major League Baseball in the position of pitcher

Owen Bradford Pickett (1930-2010) who was a Democratic politician from America was a member of the United States House of Representatives

Thomas Augustus Pickett (1906-1980) who was a politician from America who represented Texas’s 7th Congressional district in the United States House of Representatives

Rex Pickett who was born in the year 1956 who was a writer from America who is most popular for his novel Sideways

Pickett Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Sa. three pickaxes ar. Crest—A dexter arm embowed, vested ar. cuffed vert, charged with two bars wavy of the last, holding a pickaxe ppr.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Sable
2. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 26
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P35
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Axe
7. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P268
8. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 97
9. A Display of Heraldry, J. Guillim, Blome, London, 1679, P107
10. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P105
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79