Pickford Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Pickford Family Coat of Arms

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Pickford Coat of Arms Meaning

Pickford Name Origin & History

Variations of this name are: Pichford.

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Pickford. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

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Pickford Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Pickford blazon are the lion rampant, chequy and barrulet. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and or.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bright yellow colour frequently found in coats of arms is known to heralds as Or, or sometimes simply as Gold.3Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27. Along with, argent, or silver it forms the two “metals” of heraldry – one of the guidelines of heraldic design is that silver objects should not be placed upon gold fields and vice versa 4A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85. The yellow colour is often associated with the Sun, and the zodiacal sign of Leo.5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53.

There can be no animal more clearly associated with Heraldry than the lion, majestic King of the Beasts. Originally it appeared only in one pose, erect, on one paw, with the others raised 6Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64 but such was the popularity of this figure, and the need to distinguish arms from each other, that it soon came to be shown in an enormous range of forms 7Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141. The lion rampant is an example of these modified form, and any family would be proud to have such a noble creature displayed on their arms. Rampant is the default attitude of the lion, raised on its hind legs, facing to the dexter and with front paws extended in a fearsome and powerful pose.

Chequy (a word with a surprising number of different spellings!) is what is known as a treatment, a repeating pattern usually used to fill the whole background of the shield with a series of alternately coloured squares 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy. These squares are usually quite small (there should be at least 20 in total), giving the appearance of a chess board, but any combination of colours may be used. It can also be used as a patterning on some of the larger ordinaries, such as the pale and fess, in which case there are three rows of squares. Wade, an authority on heraldic meaning groups chequy with all those heraldic features that are composed of squares and believes that they represent “Constancy”, but also quotes another author Morgan, who says that they can also be associated with “wisdom…verity, probity…and equity”, and offers in evidence the existence of the common English saying that an honest man is a ”Square Dealer” 9The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100.

The barrulet is the very narrowest member of the family of horizontal bands across the shield. The largest is the fesse, originally occupying one third of the height of the shield, barrulets are a mere one twentieth of the height and always occur in groups 10A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barrulet. Like the other bar-like objects, Wade associates the use of this device with those who “set the bar…against angry passions and evil temptations” 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P46.

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Pickford Name

Pickford Origin:

England

Origins of Pickford:

This interesting name is of Anglo-Saxon origin, and is a geographical surname acquiring from either of the places called “Pickforde,” in Ticehurst, Sussex, or “Pitchford,” in Shropshire. The latter noted in the Domesday Book of 1086 as “Piceforde”, and in the Shropshire Fees Court documents of 1242 as “Picford”, and means “the ford where pitch could acquire”, evolved from the Olde English pre 7th Century “pic”, which means pitch, used here of the inclination, with “Ford”, which means castle. “Pickforde” in Sussex means “the pig crossing,” derived from the Olde English “picga,” which means pig, and “frod,” which means as before. Geographical names were frequently given to the king of the estate and to those old citizens who departed to live or work in another place. One Robert Picford was one of the early immigrants in the New World. He gave a ticket for Virginia from Barbadoes in September 1679.

Variations:

More common variations are: Pbickford, Pikford, Picford, Bickford, Packford, Peckford, Pickfard, Pikeford, Pickfort, Bickfordd.

England:

The surname Pickford first appeared in Shropshire at Pitchford, a small, Hamlet, and church, in the union of Atcham, Hundred of Condover where the hamlet acquires its name from the strong gloomy smell that originates from the oily substance that frequently covers the surface of the water. Hence the place means “fort near a place where pitch if found,” from the Old English words “pic” and “Ford.” The Domesday Book of 1086 lists the place as Piceforde and also recorded as Pitchford Hall as “Edric, and Leofric and Wulfric held it as three estates.

The very first recording spelling of the family was shown to be that of John de Picford, dated about 1273, in the “Shropshire Hundred Rolls.” It was during the time of King Edward I who was known to be the “The Hammer of the Scots,” dated 1272-1307. The origin of surnames during this period became a necessity with the introduction of personal taxation. It came to be known as Poll Tax in England.

Ireland:

Many of the people with surname Pickford had moved to Ireland during the 17th century.

United States of America:

Individuals with the surname Pickford landed in the United States in three different centuries respectively in the 17th, 18th, and 19th. Some of the people with the name Pickford who arrived in the United States in the 17th century included Susan Pickford, who came to Barbados in 1659. Mary Pickford, who came to Virginia in 1663 with her husband

People with the surname Pickford who landed in the United States in the 18th century included Joseph Pickford, a security passenger, who came to America in 1725. Mark Pickford, who settled in Maryland in 1737.

The following century saw much more Pickford surnames arrive. Some of the people with the surname Pickford who arrived in the United States in the 19th century included Isaac Pickford at the age of 28, landed in New York in 1812. Isaac and John Pickford, both arrived in New York in 1820. John Pickford, who came to Mississippi in 1844

Australia:

Some of the individuals with the surname Pickford who landed in Australia in the 19th century included Alfred Pickford at the age of 33 arrived in South Australia in 1853 aboard the ship “Marshall Bennett”

New-Zealand:

Some of the population with the surname Pickford who arrived in New Zealand in the 19th century included Rosa E. Pickford at the age of 21, arrived in Wellington, New Zealand aboard the ship “Rimutaka” in 1885

Here is the population distribution of the last name Pickford: England 3,221; United States 1,288; Australia 691; South Africa 530; Canada 437; New Zealand 293; Wales 214; Germany 134; Scotland 105; France 73

Notable People:

Kevin Pickford is a retired Major League Baseball pitcher.

Lottie Pickford was a Canadian-American actress and sister of Mary Pickford.

Martin Pickford was a Kenyan-born paleoanthropologist.

Mary Pickford was a Canadian-American actress.

Olive Thomas Pickford was an American actress.

Pickford Family Gift Ideas

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Chequy or and az. on a fess gu. three lions ramp. of the first. Crest—A lion’s head erased.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 27
4. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P85
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 64
7. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P136-141
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Chequy
9. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P100
10. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Barrulet
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P46