Pigot Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Pigot Family Coat of Arms

Buy Image File - $12.99

Pigot Coat of Arms Meaning

Pigot Name Origin & History

We have several coat of arms design(s) for the name Pigot. Click on the thumbnails to view each design.

Other Services:

Digitally Drawn Arms

Hand Painted Arms

3D Brass Arms

Genealogy Research

pigot coat of arms

Pigot Coat of Arms Meaning

The four main devices (symbols) in the Pigot blazon are the fusil, pike fish, martlet and mullet. The two main tinctures (colors) are azure and gules.

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

Red in heraldry is given the name Gules, sometimes said to be the “martyr’s colour”3The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36. The colour is also associated with Mars, the red planet, and the zodiacal sign Aries 4Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. Later heralds of a more poetical nature would sometimes refer to the colour as ruby, after the precious stone.5A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77.

The fusil is a shape rather like a lozenge but taller and narrower, hence fusily refers to a field of similar shapes arranged in a regulat pattern. 6A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil It is though that the shape originally derived from that of a spindle of yarn. Wade believes that the symbol is of very great age and quotes an earlier writer, Morgan who ascribes it the meaning of “Negotiation”. 7The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117

Fish in great variety abound in Heraldry, many different species inhabit coats of arms 8Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P150, although truth be told many of the actual images are sometimes indistinguishable, being shown as a stylised, and easily recognised “trout” shape 9A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P137 that a child might draw. The actual name used in the coat of arms may be some play-on-words or allusion to the family name, as in the famous arms of the de Lucy family, being “Gules, three lucies or”, 10Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 79 this being an ancient name for the fish we call today a “pike”. It is possible that the pike fish has been used in this fashion, or it may simply relate to some fishing activity in the history of the family.

The martlett is by far the most common bird to appear in British Heraldry, perhaps only equalled by the eagle, however it is not a species ever to be found in an ornithologists handbook! The word itself is though to have come from the French word merlette, the female blackbird and itself a similar type of charge used in French Heraldry. 11A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet. Over time the image has become quite stylised, without visible legs or distinctive feathers. Wade suggests that this representation arises from “the appearance of the bird of paradise to ancient travellers” 12The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79. Other bird species may be named in coats of arms (cornish chough is a frequent example) but in actual execution their appearance is often indistinguishable from the martlet.

Pigot Family Gift Ideas

100% Satisfaction Guarantee

Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Pigot Name

Pigot Origin:

Norman

Origins of Name:

The Pigot surname originated in Normandy and made its way to England after the Norman conquest of England of 1066. The surname was a descriptive surname originally deriving from the Germanic word ‘pic’ which means sharp or pointed. It was used to describe a home near a pointed hill, use of a pointy tool, sharp object, or weapon, or a nickname for a tall person who was thin. Norman use would combine ‘pic’ with the suffixes ‘et’ or ‘ot’ and the surname Picot or Pigot was created.

Variations:

More common variations are:

Pigott, Piggot, Piggett, Piggott, Piggot, Pigot, Picot

History:

England:

The first known instance of the surname was in Cheshire and Cambridgeshire. Picot of Cambridge was a Norman landowner who would eventually be appointed by William the Conqueror as the first Sheriff of Cambridgeshire in return for his loyalty. The family would lose their entire estate when his son Robert was connected in a conspiracy against King Henry I. Robert left the country and the entire family’s estate was forfeited.

The first known recording of the surname Pigot is of Roger Picot in 1086 in the Domesday Book of Cheshire.

William Piket was recorded in 1177 in Berkshire, Waubert Pyket was recorded in 1277 in London, and Peter Pygot was recorded in 1285 in Cambridgeshire.

Adam Pickett was the commander of the ship New London in 1679, which would sail for Barbados.

Pigot Today:

3,500 in the United States

1,700 in England

540 in Australia

Notable People:

Mary Pigot (1640), former wife of Sir Robert Burdett, 3rd Baronet

George Pigot (1719), 1st Baron Pigot former governor of Madras

British Major General Henry Pigot(1750), British army officer

Edward Pigot (1858), Irish/Australian Jesuit priest, seismologist and astronomer

John Edward Pigot (1822), Irish music collector

Neil Pigot (1961), Australian actor

Pigot Family Gift Ideas

Browse Pigot family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

Clothing & Accessories

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Kitchen & Bath

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

Fun & Games

100% Product Satisfaction Guarantee

More pigot Family Gift Ideas

Blazons & Genealogy Notes

1) (Patshull, co. Stafford, bart.). Motto—Tont foys prest. Erm. three pikeheads in fess sa. Creat—A wolf’s head erased ar.
2) (co. Derby). Gu. a bend fusily betw. six martlets or.
3) (co. Norfolk). Ar. on a bend betw. two cotises engr. sa. three mullets of the field.
4) (London). Gu. a fess engr. ar. betw. three bezants.
5) (Dodington, co. York). Az. two bars or, in chief three bezants.
6) (co. York). Or, on a cross gu. five escallops ar.
7) (Radcliffe-upon-Soar, co. Nottingham). Az. a bend fusily betw. six martlets or.
8) (Preston, co. Lancaster, 1664). Erm. three fusils conjoined in fess sa. Crest—A wolf's head erased sa.
9) Ar. three mullets betw. two bends engr. sa. Crest—A martlet gu.
10) Quarterly, gu. and sa. a cross ar.
11) Quarterly, az. and gu. four lions ramp. counterchanged.
12) Ar. three martlets in bend sa. betw. two bendlets engr. gu.
13) Sa. a saltire patonce ar. betw. four lions pass. or.
14) Az. a bend fusily betw. six martlets or.
15) (Baron Pigot, of Patshull, co. Dublin; created 1766, extinct 1777). Supporters—Two leopards guard. ppr. Ar. three fusils in fess sa. Crest—A wolf's head erased sa.

1 Comment

  • M. Pigot says:

    Number 1 relates directly to number 15 as Lord George Pigot bought the Patshull estate. There is no place in Ireland called Patshull.

Leave A Comment

References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
4. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
5. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P77
6. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Fusil
7. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P117
8. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P150
9. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P137
10. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 79
11. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Martlet
12. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P79