Plant Family Crest, Coat of Arms and Name History

Plant Family Coat of Arms

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Plant Coat of Arms Meaning

Plant Name Origin & History

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Plant Coat of Arms Meaning

The three main devices (symbols) in the Plant blazon are the label, rose and stag. The three main tinctures (colors) are azure, gules and argent .

The bright, strong blue color in Heraldry is known in English as azure, and similarly in other European languages – azul in Spanish, azurro in Italian and azur in French. The word has its roots in the Arabic word lazura, also the source of the name of the precious stone lapis lazuli 1A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure. Despite this, those heralds who liked to associate colours with jewels chose instead to describe blue as Sapphire. According to Wade, the use of this colour symbolises “Loyalty and Truth” 2The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36.

The bold red colour on a heraldic shield is known as gules. It has a long history within heraldry, it is known that one of those who besieged the scottish castle of Carlaverock in 1300 was the French knight Euremions de la Brette who had as his arms a simple red shield.3The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180. The word gules is thought to come from the Arabic gule, or “red rose” 4Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313. Later writers associated it with the precious stone ruby and the metal iron 5Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53, perhaps because of the red glow of iron in the heat of the blacksmith’s forge.

Argent is the heraldic metal Silver and is usually shown as very pure white. It is also known more poetically as pearl, moon (or luna) 6Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53. In a sketch or drawing it is represented by plain, unmarked paper 7A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11.

The label holds a special place in heraldry, originlly being a temporary mark, used by the oldest son while his father was still alive. In appearance it is a horizontal bar near the top of the shield from which descend 3 or 5 “points” or small rectangles descending from the bar. 8A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label In more recent use it has come to used as charge in its own right 9A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154 and may have additional charges on each point, which can create a pleasing visual effect.

Natural objects abound in heraldry, and one category that gives especial delight are the many flowers and flowering plants that frequently occur 10A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262. The rose is also of this type, being drawn, at least a little, realistically and often to very pleasing effect. It has long been present in English heraldry, and as a badge and symbol played an enormous in English history throughout the conflict between rival dynasties known as the War of the Roses. In addition to these familial uses, Wade suggests that red roses signify “beauty and grace” and the white represents “love and faith”. 11The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133

We should be surprised to find the stag or buck, noble quarry of many a mediaeval hunt, being illustrated in many a coat of arms. 12Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69. It shares many of the poses to be found with the lion, but also one almost unique to the deer, grazing, as if the animal is still unaware of the hunter’s approach. 13A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer. In common with all symbols related to the hunt we probably need look further for their intended meaning than the pleasure taken by the holder in such pursuits! 14The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30

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Origin, Meaning and Family History of the Plant Name

Plant Origin:

England, France

Origins of Plant:

The surname of Plant is said to be an occupational surname that hails from the country of England. This means that the original bearer of the surname of Plant most likely worked with plants, meaning that he actually carried out this job. Occupational surnames were not originally hereditary surnames. They only became hereditary if the son followed in his father’s footsteps for a career; then the surname became hereditary and was used by the children and spouse of the son. In the case of the surname of Plant, those who originally bore this surname would have worked with plants in some capacity, including the job of a gardener, or a planter. The word itself can be derived from the Old English Pre 7th Century word of “plante” and the Middle English word of “plant” which can be translated to mean “a young tree or herb.”

Variations:

More common variations are: Planta, Plante, Palant, Planet, Pylant, Pilant, Pelant, Planty, Plaunt, Plantt, Planat, Planto, Plyant, Planit

History:

England:

The first recorded spelling of the surname of Plant can be traced to the country of England. One person by the name of William Plante was mentioned and recorded in the document known as the Select Pleas of the Forest of Essex in the year of 1262. This document was ordered, decreed, and written under the reign of one King Henry III of England, who was known throughout the ages, and who was also commonly referred to as one “The Frenchman.” King Henry III of England ruled from the year of 1216 to the year of 1272. Other mentions of the surname of Plant can be found within the country of England. These mentions of the surname of Plant include one Ralph Plantebene who was recorded as living in the area of Norfolk in the year of 1199, and one Alice Planterose, who was recorded as living in the area of Warwickshire in the year of 1221. Those who are known to bear the surname of Plant within the country of England can be found in large concentrations in the areas of Norfolk, Warwickshire, Essex, Cheshire, and the areas in and around the city of London.

United States of America:

During both the 17th and 18th centuries, citizens from countries across Europe began to become displeased with the state of the government in the countries of their birth. These citizens then migrated to the United States of America in search of a new and better life for them and their families. This movement of people was known as the European Migration. Among those who migrated to the United States of America, which was at that point known as the New World or as the Colonies, was one person by the name of Matthew Plant, who settled in the state of Virginia in the year of 1635.

Here is the population distribution of the last name Plant: England 9,524; United States 7,019; Australia 2,501; Pakistan 2,263; Canada 1,641; South Africa 712; Wales 384; Netherlands 341; Philippines 322; Germany 303; France 294; Scotland 289; New Zealand 272

Notable People:

William J. Plant, who served as a Member of the New York State Assembly from the year of 1892 to the year of 1894, and who was a politician from America.

Theodore H. Plant, who served as the Presidential Elector for the state of California in the year of 2000, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Morgan Plant, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Pennsylvania in the year of 1996, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Mary Plant, who served as a Delegate to the Democratic National Convention from the state of Ohio in the year of 1964, and who was a Democratic politician from America.

Edward Plant, who served as the Prohibition Candidate for the Presidential Elector for the state of Michigan in the year of 1960, and who was a politician from America.

David Plant (1783-1851) who served as a Representative from the state of Connecticut at large in the year of 1827 to the year of 1829 and who was a politician from America.

Plant Family Gift Ideas

Browse Plant family gift ideas and products below. If there are multiple coats of arms for this surname, you will see them at the top of this page and can click on the various coat of arms designs to apply them to the gift ideas below.

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Blazons & Genealogy Notes

Argent a label in bend azure in chief a rose gules. Crest— A stag trippant gules.

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References   [ + ]

1. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Azure
2. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P36
3. The Siege of Carlaverock, N. Harris, Nichols & Son, London, 1828, P180
4. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 313
5. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
6. Understanding Signs & Symbols – Heraldry, S. Oliver & G. Croton, Quantum, London, 2013, P53
7. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1847, P11
8. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Label
9. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P154
10. A Complete Guide to Heraldry, A.C. Fox-Davies, Bonanza (re-print of 1909 Edition), New York, 1978, P262
11. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P132-133
12. Boutell’s Heraldry, J.P. Brooke-Little, Warne, (revised Edition) London 1970, P 69
13. A Glossary of Terms used in British Heraldry, J.H. Parker, Oxford, 1894, Entry:Deer
14. The Symbolisms of Heraldry, W. Cecil Wade, George Redway, London, 1898 P30